Recommended reading on the First World War

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Attrition
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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby Attrition » 05 Apr 2017 22:29

Attrition wrote:The Battle of the Somme Matthias Strohn (ed.) 2016

A collection of essays that promises to elucidate recent academic thinking. I began with chapter 4 by James Corum on the air war over the Somme and that phrase sums the essay. Corum can't write and I commiserate with anyone who has had to read his work for a course, I'd rather suck shite through a wire brush. Getting something positive from the chapter is going to be hard work but I'll find a way.


I've read most of the book and either I'm better informed than the writers or they're pulling their punches. It's worth reading but I would recommend borrowing it from a library first.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby Plain Old Dave » 09 Jul 2017 22:02

W.S. Sims' "The Victory At Sea." No holds barred look at the efforts to neutralize the submarine threat following the US' entry into the First World War.

John Mosier's "The Myth Of The Great War." One of very few post-1920 histories of WW1 that doesn't whitewash the US' key role in Allied victory.

Allen Axlerod's "Miracle At Belleau Wood." A very good overview of the land battle that turned the tide of the First World War.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby Felix C » 10 Jul 2017 23:10

jetlag78 wrote:Intelligence War in Latin America, 1914-1922, by Jamie Bisher, McFarland Publishing, 2016.

I regret that this book is priced for academic and institutional sales, but I believe that it is the only English-language book which thoroughly covers WWI in Latin America, which was largely a war between intelligence services...
- Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Intelligence-W ... mie+bisher
- Author's website: http://ww1latinamerica.weebly.com/


I read this book and it is absolutely fascinating.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby Attrition » 15 Jul 2017 13:35

The Other Side Of The Wire Volume 3: With The XIV Reserve Corps: The Period Of Transition 2 July 1916-August 1917 Hardcover – 15 Aug 2017

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby Attrition » 16 Aug 2017 15:11

Hampton, M. E. 1st Anzac Corps and the Battle of Pozières Ridge, 1916

https://digital.library.adelaide.edu.au ... 2whole.pdf (2014) School of History and Politics, University of Adelaide oclc: 964934243

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby The Captain » 13 Feb 2018 22:06

Folly and Malice: The Habsburgs, the Balkans and the Start of World War One. By John Zametica (Shepheard-Walwyn, 2017)

If you want a book that finally tells you ‘what the hell was going on’ in Austria-Hungary that led to a first world war, then with this one you find out, at last, everything you really need to know but didn’t know to ask. What the Austrians really wanted, the Hungarians, Croats, various Serbians, Russians, Germans, Great Britain... Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Princip, the Black Hand, Kaiser Wilhelm...they’re all here, finally in their true colours. Folly and Malice: The Habsburg Empire, the Balkans and the Start of World War One is probably the definitive book on the East European origins of the first world war. Demolishing the claims of major academics like Chris Clark, and overthrowing much of the history taught to schoolchildren for a hundred years, it comes recommended by leading historian Professor Sir Hew Strachan as ‘a brilliant piece of writing on one of the most important aspects of the First World War…’, by the Historical Association as ‘a revelation... its challenge to existing thinking makes it a very significant contribution to the continuing debate about the causes of the Great War’ - and by renowned academic Professor Vernon Bogdanor as "a seminal work which forces readers to reflect further on issues they had thought settled...a powerfully argued work, whose conclusions will be carefully studied by historians for many years." It’s a big read, but you won’t find a better or more insightful one. The first half is fascinating, scene-setting background stuff. Then it moves on to 1914 like no book before. The chapter on the assassination can’t be bettered for drama or detail and reads like an emerging film. There’s a JFK-style whiff of possible conspiracy by which the Archduke is allowed to walk into a hornet’s nest in Sarajevo. And the July Crisis which led to the war is illuminated at the expense of a legion of historians of this and other generations. Get this book and keep your brain on. There’s not been another one like it.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Postby The Ibis » 14 Feb 2018 01:21

The Captain wrote:Folly and Malice: The Habsburgs, the Balkans and the Start of World War One. By John Zametica (Shepheard-Walwyn, 2017)

If you want a book that finally tells you ‘what the hell was going on’ in Austria-Hungary that led to a first world war, then with this one you find out, at last, everything you really need to know but didn’t know to ask. What the Austrians really wanted, the Hungarians, Croats, various Serbians, Russians, Germans, Great Britain... Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Gavrilo Princip, the Black Hand, Kaiser Wilhelm...they’re all here, finally in their true colours. Folly and Malice: The Habsburg Empire, the Balkans and the Start of World War One is probably the definitive book on the East European origins of the first world war. Demolishing the claims of major academics like Chris Clark, and overthrowing much of the history taught to schoolchildren for a hundred years, it comes recommended by leading historian Professor Sir Hew Strachan as ‘a brilliant piece of writing on one of the most important aspects of the First World War…’, by the Historical Association as ‘a revelation... its challenge to existing thinking makes it a very significant contribution to the continuing debate about the causes of the Great War’ - and by renowned academic Professor Vernon Bogdanor as "a seminal work which forces readers to reflect further on issues they had thought settled...a powerfully argued work, whose conclusions will be carefully studied by historians for many years." It’s a big read, but you won’t find a better or more insightful one. The first half is fascinating, scene-setting background stuff. Then it moves on to 1914 like no book before. The chapter on the assassination can’t be bettered for drama or detail and reads like an emerging film. There’s a JFK-style whiff of possible conspiracy by which the Archduke is allowed to walk into a hornet’s nest in Sarajevo. And the July Crisis which led to the war is illuminated at the expense of a legion of historians of this and other generations. Get this book and keep your brain on. There’s not been another one like it.


Thanks. I have the book on order and was hoping people might provide reviews of it.
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