Recommended reading on the First World War

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jamesmith1
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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by jamesmith1 » 27 Mar 2019 12:42

Nice Information I am going to read this Book the first world war i like most to read books so i will prefer to read this
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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 27 Mar 2019 21:15

Delaney, Douglas E. Durflinger S. M. Capturing Hill 70*: Canada's Forgotten Battle of the First World War (2016) UBC Press 978-0-7748-3359-2

A book of essays and a nice resurrection of a battle (action) known to aficionados but to few others.

* Ignore the catchpenny title from the colon to the publication date.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by vickyaheer » 13 Apr 2019 09:22

This information will help me a lot in my upcoming exams! Thank you for sharing.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 16 May 2020 16:55

From the Somme to Victory: The British Army's Experience on the Western Front 1916-1918 (2014) by Peter Simkins

Arrived yesterday; there's a very good survey of the literature in chapter 1 (I liked his swipe at Prior and Wilson) and I'm reading chapter 3 about the management during the Battle of the Somme; very interesting.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 24 Aug 2020 14:33

Lossberg's War: The World War I Memoirs of a German Chief of Staff (Foreign Military Studies) Hardcover, 2017
by Fritz von Lossberg (Author), Holger H. Herwig (Author), David T. Zabecki (Editor).

Outrageous price (£52) but worth it for the aficionado; I've only really read the Somme and 3rd Ypres [chapters] (surprisingly short but with a copy of his defensive policy directive of 27 June 1917, pp.289-299). The German command's perspective of the Battle of the Somme (albeit filtered through Lossberg's point of view) tends to support the post-revisionist view that the battle damaged the German army more than its opponents. Falkenhayn gets a lot of blame for the difficulties wished on the 2nd Army by his 1916 strategy. Lossberg doesn't seem too interested in the grand strategic resource dilemma facing Germany, once a third million-man army took the field against them. There's plenty of operational information from which OOB can be gleaned and the behind the scenes organisation of manpower, equipment and ammunition. The translation is in [North] American, which grates a bit on this Limey (Have terms like gun and howitzer gone out of fashion? "Previously reconnoitred"? When else can you reconnoitre?) but without the labours of Herwig and Zabecki, we Anglophone monoglots wouldn't have this valuable resource. Thanks, them blokes.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by The Ibis » 24 Aug 2020 20:31

Attrition wrote:
24 Aug 2020 14:33
Lossberg's War: The World War I Memoirs of a German Chief of Staff (Foreign Military Studies) Hardcover, 2017
by Fritz von Lossberg (Author), Holger H. Herwig (Author), David T. Zabecki (Editor).

Outrageous price (£52) but worth it for the aficionado; I've only really read the Somme and 3rd Ypres [chapters] (surprisingly short but with a copy of his defensive policy directive of 27 June 1917, pp.289-299). The German command's perspective of the Battle of the Somme (albeit filtered through Lossberg's point of view) tends to support the post-revisionist view that the battle damaged the German army more than its opponents. Falkenhayn gets a lot of blame for the difficulties wished on the 2nd Army by his 1916 strategy. Lossberg doesn't seem too interested in the grand strategic resource dilemma facing Germany, once a third million-man army took the field against them. There's plenty of operational information from which OOB can be gleaned and the behind the scenes organisation of manpower, equipment and ammunition. The translation is in [North] American, which grates a bit on this Limey (Have terms like gun and howitzer gone out of fashion? "Previously reconnoitred"? When else can you reconnoitre?) but without the labours of Herwig and Zabecki, we Anglophone monoglots wouldn't have this valuable resource. Thanks, them blokes.
What do they call guns and howitzers?
"The secret of managing is to keep the guys who hate you away from the guys who are undecided." - Casey Stengel

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 26 Aug 2020 18:11

"Flat trajectory guns" (i.e. guns) p. 293, "high-trajectory howitzers" (i.e. howitzers) p. 296. Send for the pleonasm police.

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by The Ibis » 27 Aug 2020 21:01

Attrition wrote:
26 Aug 2020 18:11
"Flat trajectory guns" (i.e. guns) p. 293, "high-trajectory howitzers" (i.e. howitzers) p. 296. Send for the pleonasm police.
I had to look that up. Nice.
"The secret of managing is to keep the guys who hate you away from the guys who are undecided." - Casey Stengel

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 27 Aug 2020 23:07

Eythenkew! ;O)

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Re: Recommended reading on the First World War

Post by Attrition » 15 Nov 2020 01:29

The Myth and Reality of German Warfare: Operational Thinking from Moltke the Elder to Heusinger by Gerhard P Gross, David T Zabecki (Editor), Foreword by Robert M Citino

With the caveat above that the book must continuously be translated from American into English (theoretician - eh? try theorist, which he does in the next chapter) this is a thoroughly researched volume as far as the chapters I've read (pre-Great War and Great War) go and an interesting comparison with After Clausewitz: German Military Thinkers Before the Great War (2001) by Antulio J. Echevarria III. I was quite pleased that he rescued Schlieffen and Moltke the Younger from the facile conclusions of earlier writers by using the primary sources recovered in the last couple of decades and a rather less polemical approach. I'll let you know if he keeps it up. A minor point is that he seems to take seriously the idea that the German Empire suffered from excessive compartmentalisation in the executive side, which I think is no more than the conventional divide and rule found in all bureaucracies.

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