Gallipoli Wars

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tigre
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Re: Gallipoli Wars

Post by tigre » 05 Apr 2017 23:44

Hello to all :D; more........................

The beaches of Gaba Tepe.

Source: http://www.ebay.de/itm/1915-The-SPHERE- ... 1676442648

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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tigre
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Re: Gallipoli Wars

Post by tigre » 11 May 2019 19:01

Hello to all :D; more........................

Naval Operations 1915.

A number of the older ships had been sent for operations against the Dardanelles. By February 1 the squadron there had grown to be a strong combined fleet in which the new super-Dreadnaught, the Queen Elizabeth was the most powerful. The island of Tenedos had been seized and Lemnos-nominally held by Greece, which tolerated the British use-furnished the Bay of Mudros which was being used as an advance base for naval operations. On February 19, 1915, eight ships of the combined fleet-under Vice Admiral Carden (British) and Rear Admiral Gueratte (French)-attacked the outer forts at long range at 8:00 A. M. The firing kept up all the morning. The forts made no reply. At about 3:00 P. M., the fleet closed in and the forts then opened fire. By sundown the batteries on the European side w'ere again quiet but Kum Kale was still firing. The light failed and the fleet withdrew no damage had been done the fleet.

On February 25 the weather, which had been bad for several days, cleared. Four ships of the fleet resumed the long range bombardment on the outer forts. The latter were outmatched. Again in the afternoon the fleet closed in. By 5:00 P. M. the last gun was fired by the Turks. It appeared that these forts were silenced. The Agamemnon was struck once, that hit being the only one causing damage to the fleet on the 25th.

Source: The Dardanelles Expedition. Lieut. Colonel Walter H. Johnson, Infantry, (D. O. L.). The Coast Artillery Journal. Vol 58 Nro 6. June 1923.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
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Tanzania
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Re: Gallipoli Wars

Post by Tanzania » 29 Nov 2023 04:42

tigre wrote:
11 May 2019 19:01
Hello to all :D; more........................
Naval Operations 1915.

Source: The Dardanelles Expedition. Lieut. Colonel Walter H. Johnson, Infantry, (D. O. L.). The Coast Artillery Journal. Vol 58 Nro 6. June 1923.

Cheers. Raúl M 8-).
Hi Raúl ,

many thanks for your source / reference: The Coast Artillery Journal. Vol 58 Nro 6. June 1923

Information not shared is lost :thumbsup:

Regards Holger
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Tanzania
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Re: Gallipoli Wars

Post by Tanzania » 07 Feb 2024 10:34

Can anyone help me to find out where this British “BL 6-inch Field Gun Mk.VII” captured at Gallipoli came from?


The original Turkish source assumes that it is a 15-cm Q.F. L/40 or L/45 Navy Gun, which I doubt.

Captured british BL 6-inch (15,2-cm) L44,7 Mk VII naval gun at Galipoli.png
Original Source: BOĞAZ’IN FEDAİLERİ 1, Çanakkale Boğazı Tahkimatları, Bayram Akgün, Istanbul 2018


Further picture sources about the identification:
http://www.landships.info/landships/art ... k_VII.html
https://jenikirbyhistory.getarchive.net ... +field+gun


Thanks in advance for any help and references.

Regards Holger
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“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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