Gallipoli Wars

Discussions on all aspects of the First World War not covered in the other sections. Hosted by Terry Duncan.
Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 08 Feb 2004 12:16

Hi Matt,
Nice photos,

The title says,
"Halt Traveller,
This soil,which you come and step on unconsciusly,
is where an age has ended."

The line below,
"Çanakkale can not be passed!" A famous quote after the war.
Best Regards
Kaan
Last edited by Kaan Caglar on 14 Feb 2004 21:15, edited 1 time in total.

Matt
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Post by Matt » 09 Feb 2004 13:00

Hey KaaN

Thanks for the translation.

The little guy in this photo a fire warden, his lookout is at a high point just near the furthest point reached by the ANZAC's. He was a real character & very friendly, spoke very little English but invited me to sit with him and have some Turkish tea (very sweet and tasted great).

I arrived approaching dusk on my birthday, after my time with the fire warden I went down to ANZAC Cove and sat overlooking the beach, wondering what was going through the minds of the men as they approached the shore. Very moving for me.

Gallipoli is a great site and I recommend anyone who has the chance to visit, to do so.

Regards.
Matt.
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Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 09 Feb 2004 17:57

Hi Matt,
Matt wrote:. He was a real character & very friendly, spoke very little English but invited me to sit with him and have some Turkish tea (very sweet and tasted great).
Thats a typical character of Turkish villagers,lovely isnt it?
Matt wrote: I arrived approaching dusk on my birthday, after my time with the fire warden I went down to ANZAC Cove and sat overlooking the beach, wondering what was going through the minds of the men as they approached the shore. Very moving for me.
Same thing happened to me but another point of view. I hided near a bush looking to the sea,just wondering what was going through the soldiers who waited for the boats of men upon them... Really depressing.
Thanks for sharing.

Kaan
Last edited by Kaan Caglar on 13 Mar 2005 12:06, edited 1 time in total.

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John W
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Post by John W » 09 Feb 2004 21:15

Great job guys!

Excellent thread :)

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 11 Feb 2004 23:39

Last edited by Kaan Caglar on 13 Mar 2005 12:08, edited 3 times in total.

Tolga Alkan
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Post by Tolga Alkan » 12 Feb 2004 15:20

Very good work Kaan,my friend.I've very detailled titles about Battle of Gallipoli which were published by military history institue of Turkish Army in early 1980s.All in Turkish :cry:

Keep this work alive!

Tolga

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 12 Feb 2004 16:14

Thanks Tolga,
Can I find that anywhere around?
Regards
Kaan

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 14 Feb 2004 21:10

To keep the thread alive and attract more attention let me post some more photos.

The members of the Parlement in Turkey in an expedition with Mustafa Kemal on 14th of October:
Image

English having fun:
Image

Another Expedition around the Forts:
Image

A messenger brings a note to Mustafa Kemal during Gallipoli:
Image

A detailed map showing the landings as well as the Forts and Batteries:
Image

An other map showing the Anzac advance on 25th of April:
Image

Photograph thought to be taken from the deck of the
transport ship Galeka, of members of the 7th Battalion,
2nd Brigade, AIF, being towed by a steam-pinnace
towards Fisherman's Hut on North Beach:
Image

Turkish Artillery:
Image

The Hamidiye Canon:
Image

Seddul-Bahr Canon:
Image

The forts in the narrowest part of the Dardanelles, looking from Chanak to Kilidbair at the other side of the straits:
Image

A boxing match between English Troops during Gallipoli:
Image

Camels on their way to Galliopi from Egypt:
Image

A church service on board:
Image

HMS Irresistible on her way to Gallipoli:
Image

Looking down on a Balloon:
Image

The Crew of E-11:
Image

HMS Queen Elizabeth leaving Mudros(a port in Lemnos) for Gallipoli:
Image

A British transport passing another French transport on their way to Gallipoli:
Image

Having fun on a captured Turkish Gun:
Image


The story-line will continue if you want..
Looking forward for comments&corrections.
Best Regards
Kaan

Ulan
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Post by Ulan » 15 Feb 2004 10:39

Does anny one know wich ship it is with the balloon?

Ulan,

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 15 Feb 2004 12:47

Ulan wrote:Does anny one know wich ship it is with the balloon?
Hello Ulan, It is probably the famous balloon ship HMS Manica which was commissioned on 23 March 1915. It was the first kite-balloon ship.
Regards
Kaan

Matt
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Post by Matt » 15 Feb 2004 14:42

Great photo's KaaN.

I have read a lot about Ataturk and his actions at Gallipoli, do you have details of other decorated Turkish soldiers and their actions at Gallipoli?

The most famous and highly decorated Australian soldier of the first war wa Albert Jacka, who was described by C.E.W. Bean, the official Australian historian, as 'Australia’s greatest front-line soldier’.

This is from: http://www.troopertours.com/Jacka.asp

Jacka’s V.C. action at Gallipoli, 19th May 1915.

On the 19th of May, 45,000 Turks were amassed behind the Turkish frontline and ordered to drive the allies into the sea. Wave after wave of Turkish soldiers launched themselves at their country's invaders. At approximately 3 a.m. on 19 May, a group of Turkish soldiers crept up on the exposed Courtney's Post and after bombing and attacking the position and killing a number of the Australians, captured ten metres of this vital position. Acting Lance Corporal Albert Jacka from a protected position in the fire step fired shots into trench’s rear wall, stopping the Turks from reaching the main communications trench, and Australians at either end stopped them from advancing further along the trench.
Lt. Hamilton climbed out of his trench and ran to assist but was shot in the head. Another officer, Lt. Crabbe attempted to join Jacka by crossing the mouth of the communication trench where Hamilton had been but Jacka stopped him. Crabbe then called for volunteers to assist Jacka and three came forward. Jacka then leapt safely into the captured trench but the man following him was shot three times as soon as he came into view. Jacka realised the plan was not going to work and stopped the others from following. He dashed back, dragging to safety his comrade who, despite his wounds, had not been killed.

Jacka asked Crabbe to be allowed to make an attempt at re-taking the trench alone. He approached the Turks as close as he could along the trench then mounted the parapet and crept into No Man's Land, where he waited until his comrades created a diversion with rifle fire and bombs. Jacka's jumped into the trench, shot five Turks, bayoneted two and took three prisoner. Another two were shot as they scrambled out of the trench. 19 Turkish rifles were counted on the trench floor. Jacka remained alone there until dawn when Lt. Crabbe deemed it safe to determine the outcome of the assault. Crabbe found Jacka sitting amidst Turkish and Australian dead, rifle pointing to the prisoners and with an unlit cigarette in his mouth. "Well, I got the beggars, sir." he said.

On May 20, 1915, the Jacka wrote these words in his diary:
"Great battle at 3 a.m. Turks captured large portion of our trench. D. Coy called into the front line. Lieut. Hamilton shot dead. I led a section of men and recaptured the trench. I bayoneted two Turks, shot five, took three prisoners and cleared the whole trench. I held the trench alone for 15 minutes against a heavy attack. Lieut. Crabbe informed me that I would be recommended."

For this remarkable act of courage Jacka was awarded the V.C. (Victoria Cross) - the first to be awarded to any member of the AIF. King George V at Windsor Castle personally presented it to Jacka on 29 September 1916.

The actual citation for the award reads as such:-
"For most conspicuous bravery on the night of the 19-20th May, 1915 at Courtney's Post, Gallipoli. Lance Corporal Jacka, while holding a portion of the trench with four men was heavily attacked. When all except himself were killed or wounded, the trench was rushed and occupied by seven Turks. Lance Corporal Jacka at once attacked them single handedly and killed the whole party, five by rifle fire and two with the bayonet."

Jacka went on to win a MC at Pozieres, 7th August 1916 and a bar to his M.C. at BULLECOURT, 8 April 1917.

Regards.
Matt
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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 20 Feb 2004 01:22

Four more Australian Gallipoli VC holders in London 20th November 1915.Left to right,Lt Symons,Lt Tubb,Lt Throssell,Pvt Hamilton.Tubb was killed in action 1917,Throssell committed suicide 1930.

Image

Tolga Alkan
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Post by Tolga Alkan » 20 Feb 2004 11:26

_KaaN_ wrote:Thanks Tolga,
Can I find that anywhere around?
Regards
Kaan
Dear Kaan,
You can find its some volumes in second-hand book sellers.Just tell them,i need books of "Genel Kurmay" 8) Prices are not expensive.I hope you will find them in Izmir.

Tolga

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 20 Feb 2004 18:00

Thanks again Tolga,
Will try my chance tomorrow,I hope I can find it. :)
Kaan
Last edited by Kaan Caglar on 13 Mar 2005 12:09, edited 1 time in total.

Kaan Caglar
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Post by Kaan Caglar » 22 Feb 2004 21:05

Last edited by Kaan Caglar on 13 Mar 2005 12:11, edited 2 times in total.

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