If you were a Japanese soldier where would you fight?

Discussions on WW2 in the Pacific and the Sino-Japanese War.
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Landsturm
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Post by Landsturm » 20 Jan 2005 02:14

Landsturm, could you please give us some sources about those accounts? I'd really like to know more about those idividuals, who continued to serve their cause for several decades after hostilites ended officially.
My all information is from a book Essential Militaria by Nicholas Hobbes. I only happen to have a Finnish translation of the book and I translated it from the text. I strongly recommend in purchasing the book, even just for fun :D

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leytekursk
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Post by leytekursk » 20 Jan 2005 02:40

Baltasar, in this link you find some information about japanese holdouts.

http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/

Regards.

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 22 Jan 2005 22:53

If I were a patriotic Japanese soldier, I'd want to be at Iwo Jima, Tarawa, Okinawa or Peleliu. One, you get to die in the company of heroes and two, your sacrifice convinces the Yankees that they won't just walk into the Homeland.

Best Regards,
~D, the EviL

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Dan W.
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Post by Dan W. » 23 Jan 2005 16:59

David C. Clarke wrote:If I were a patriotic Japanese soldier, I'd want to be at Iwo Jima, Tarawa, Okinawa or Peleliu. One, you get to die in the company of heroes and two, your sacrifice convinces the Yankees that they won't just walk into the Homeland.

Best Regards,
~D, the EviL
You would only get one chance. Out of around 22,000 at Iwo Jima only 200 were alive at battles end. Same ratio at Peleliu, 11,000 soldiers, roughly 200 or less taken alive.
Okainawa was a real bloodbath, and at this stage of the game there were more seeing the desperation and giving themselves up, but still over 100,000 killed to less than 10,000 captured, many of them long after the battle was over.

Regards,
Dan

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 23 Jan 2005 22:19

Yes D.W., that's sort of my point. Forgetting the politics for a moment, you rarely find a large military force willing to fight to the death. In these cases, the Japanese units did. A patriotic Japanese Soldier of that time would probably find such sacrifice heroic and noble.

Best Regards,
David

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oneshooter
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Japanese surrenders

Post by oneshooter » 24 Jan 2005 05:01

Wasn't most of the surrendered"Japanese" on Okanawa (sp)and Iwo Jima acually Korean laborers ( read as slaves)? There were very few actual Japanese surrenders,and many of them were so badly wounded to put up a fight.

Oneshooter
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Dan W.
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Post by Dan W. » 25 Jan 2005 04:30

You are partially right, a good number of those (at Okinawa) conscripted were Okinawan, not Korean, and made up a good portion of those POW's classified as Japanese. Good point.

Regards,
Dan

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 25 Jan 2005 17:20

You have to admire the guts on both sides in fights like this. Proves again that ideological committment can't overcome firepower, but it definitely makes life difficult for the poor infantry who have to face fanatics one on one.

Best Regards,
David

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Dan W.
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Post by Dan W. » 25 Jan 2005 22:40

Someone once suggested how many of these Japanese would have been awarded the Medal of Honor had they have been fighting for the United States instead of Imperial Japan.

Their absolute refusal to surrender and willingness to fight to the death (of entire divisions of men, down to the last man) is still hard for me to fathom.

Regards,
Dan

Gustav_SC
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Post by Gustav_SC » 11 Feb 2005 08:31

Syonan-To, formerly known as Singapore, is where I would have wanted to be stationed. Some air raids later in the war, but otherwise plenty of sake, women and good times and a mass surrender (NOT a mass suicide) at war's end. Obviously, I wouldn't have made a good Jap soldier!

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