German phrase to English

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jbaum
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German phrase to English

Post by jbaum » 21 Dec 2019 16:09

I'm translating an unteroffiziere manual to English and don't fully understand the meaning of a phrase.

I am unclear about the meaning of "über den "Zapfen" bleibt" In particular, what "Zapfen" means in this context.

I have underlined it in the picture of the paragraphs below.

Thanks for any replies,

John
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history1
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Re: German phrase to English

Post by history1 » 21 Dec 2019 18:34

Hi John,
it referrs to "The process was known as doe den tap toe (Dutch for "turn off the tap"), an instruction to innkeepers to stop serving beer and send the soldiers home for the night. ".
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_tattoo#Etymology

The sentence is
" He´s not allowed to hesitate to report a comrade who stay´s over the turn off the tap [ = 12pm] and thus doesn´t execute an order [by his superior]".
Obviously your guy did turn a blind eye on his comrade who did arrive too late to the barracks to protect him from punishment. Something what his superior didn´t appreciate as he calls it "misinterpreted comradery".

jbaum
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Re: German phrase to English

Post by jbaum » 21 Dec 2019 20:58

Excellent. I would not have interpreted that correctly, ever. Thanks for the help. In the U.S. we simply call it "closing time".
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Sheldrake
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Re: German phrase to English

Post by Sheldrake » 22 Dec 2019 18:56

The term gives rise to the military music to tell everyone that it is time to turn off the tap - Zapfenstreich now ceremonial parades. The same term in low German or Dutch gives us Tattoo and for our american chums "Taps".

Originally the term referred to soldiers billeted around a town's inns. The Zapfenstreich music told landlords to stop serving drink and for soldiery to retire to their billets. The term stuck even after soldiers were housed in barracks.

jbaum
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Re: German phrase to English

Post by jbaum » 22 Dec 2019 22:23

Thanks for that. I always appreciate an education.
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