hummel, hummel

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G, Y?
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Location: Coloradostan

hummel, hummel

Post by G, Y? » 29 Dec 2021 16:19

OK, I know about the spg with the 150mm gun by that name.

In Against the Odds, Johann Streiber wrote that he had been separated from his unit and was retreating west on his own. After a couple of days, he saw a truck and circled around it until he could identify the nationality of the men around it. Knowing that the Russians could speak german, he began shouting a Hamburg idiom, "Hummel, hummel!" The men around the truck recognized him as german and he was able to approach.

Can someone explain the "hummel, hummel!" to me? I would have sung a church song or some song known to the region (not that I know any song or can sing).

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Hans1906
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Re: hummel, hummel

Post by Hans1906 » 29 Dec 2021 16:55

G, Y?,
The Hamburg greeting "Hummel, Hummel - Mors, Mors" is a traditional saying or exclamation originating in Hamburg, in which one person addresses a second with "Hummel, Hummel", who then replies "Mors, Mors". It is not so much a common greeting in Hamburg, but rather a distinctive sign or battle cry used by Hamburgers.
Source: "Hamburger Gruß" https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger_Gruß
(Sorry, only av. in the german language).

Translatable with "Moin-Moin" in my north german homeland, one greets with a "Moin", and one receives a "Moin-Moin" in return.
A well-meant greeting, friendly, that's all it is.

Dat gah jo good! (Low German dialect) (Take Care!) :wink:

"Coloradostan", strange, first time I read this... :lol:


Hans
„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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FransN
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Re: hummel, hummel

Post by FransN » 29 Dec 2021 17:26

Hi all,

Apparently Ostuf. Georg Preuss, CO of 10.(gep.)/SS-Pz. Gren. Rgt. 2 during the Ardennes offensive, used the expression "Masche, Masche". I cannot remember the source or the context. Does anybody know what it means? And in what context it was used?

Best regards and a good 2022,
Frans

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Hans1906
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Re: hummel, hummel

Post by Hans1906 » 29 Dec 2021 17:28

Btw,

people close to home never say "Hallo!", or about "Hi!" in my north German homeland.
You say "Moin!", at any time of day, and night, that is still very normal, children are taught for decades in the Low German language, unfortunately not in all schools. :cry:


Hans
„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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Hans1906
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Re: hummel, hummel

Post by Hans1906 » 29 Dec 2021 17:45

FransN,

A "Mesh", colloquially a deception (Eine "Masche"...)
Deception is a misconception (error) caused by circumstances or sensory perceptions that do not correspond to truth or reality, which lead to an erroneous perception of a fact. It does not matter whether the deception is deliberately brought about by another (someone is deceived) or not (someone is deceived). In the first case one speaks also of deception (or colloquially Masche.).
Täuschung https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Täuschung


Hans
„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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