urgent! can anybody tell me what HALT meant in nazi germany?

Need help with translating WW1, Inter-War or WW2 related documents or information?
Phaethon
Member
Posts: 935
Joined: 07 Apr 2002 21:14

Post by Phaethon » 25 Jun 2002 20:29

Qvist wrote:The best English translation of "halt!" I can think of is actually "halt!". They mean exactly the same thing. :)


Well not quite, the definitions for stop in the New Oxford English Dictionary runs to a third of a page, where as halt takes up but 3 or 4 column-cm. The verb halt is defined in terms of stop as "halt (verb) to come to an abrupt stop" but stop is not defined in terms of halt.

Interestingly halt has a more archaic meaning "to walk with a limp" (presumably haltingly) - perhaps this is a reference to Goebbels? :)

Cheers,

K.

Ken Cocker
London.

User avatar
Qvist
Member
Posts: 7836
Joined: 11 Mar 2002 16:59
Location: Europe

Post by Qvist » 25 Jun 2002 22:50

Well, "come to an abrupt stop" encapsulates the meaning of the German "halt!". This would, of course, be the imperative. Incidentally, the other archaic meaning you mention is used in Norwegian: "å halte" means "to limp".

cheers

Dan
Financial supporter
Posts: 8429
Joined: 10 Mar 2002 14:06
Location: California

Post by Dan » 26 Jun 2002 03:03

I supose there is a nuance of difference between halt and stop, with halt signifying something more abrupt, but I think Qvist is basically right. It's true that an old English usage for halt is lame, "the halt and the blind" for example.

Phaethon
Member
Posts: 935
Joined: 07 Apr 2002 21:14

Post by Phaethon » 26 Jun 2002 07:26

Dan wrote:I supose there is a nuance of difference between halt and stop, with halt signifying something more abrupt, but I think Qvist is basically right. It's true that an old English usage for halt is lame, "the halt and the blind" for example.


Okay, so we're all agreed: Canapial's teacher is, in fact, Joseph Goebbels, who didn't die in the bunker but escaped to teach history in Venezuela!

Easy! Next question!

:D

K.

User avatar
Raf
Member
Posts: 183
Joined: 04 Apr 2002 15:23
Location: Belgium

Post by Raf » 26 Jun 2002 08:20

Halt also means hold, grip.

User avatar
Birgitte Heuschkel
Member
Posts: 660
Joined: 18 Mar 2002 08:07
Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Post by Birgitte Heuschkel » 26 Jun 2002 09:18

Halt also means to limp in Danish.

User avatar
Siegfried Wilhelm
Member
Posts: 744
Joined: 17 Jun 2002 15:19
Location: Kleinkleckersdorf, NC, Confederate States of America

Post by Siegfried Wilhelm » 26 Jun 2002 15:15

I would say stop or hold, but just to make sure about the Thierd reich connection I dug out an actual Third Reich period dictionary to see if there is any futher meaning there and then.
It says the primary meaning is to hold, support, steadfast, firmness. Then it's to stop. Just like today.
It is used as part of many many words. The meanings seems to be just the same as it is today, so I don't get the 'Third reich' connection there.

User avatar
Phil V
Financial supporter
Posts: 1635
Joined: 21 May 2002 12:18
Location: Australia (usually)

Post by Phil V » 27 Jun 2002 12:08

Hope you teacher was not doing some advertising for Ansterdam based neo - nazi paper "HALT".

Thersites
Member
Posts: 13
Joined: 27 Mar 2002 23:24

Post by Thersites » 27 Jun 2002 21:02

Hi Canapial,
Will you chap PLEASE tell us what your teacher meant? We are all in suspense :lol:

User avatar
Birgitte Heuschkel
Member
Posts: 660
Joined: 18 Mar 2002 08:07
Location: Fredericia, Denmark

Post by Birgitte Heuschkel » 29 Jun 2002 06:40

Uh huh!

Hanz-Muller
Member
Posts: 14
Joined: 28 Jan 2003 11:16
Location: PA

Halt!!!

Post by Hanz-Muller » 04 Feb 2003 02:19

Halt is used today in Germany as well. When I read this post it brought backa memory that I had from living in Berlin. Now for an American in a large city I had never heard on no one walking across the street on a red do not walk sign when there was absolutely no traffic. But in Berlin everyone would just wait until the light turned green to walk across the street. At first I thought this was weird but it just goes to show you some of the German culture. Anyway I will never forget this. I was walking down the street and this guy on a bike went right through the red do not walk sign. All of a sudden you heard this LOUD "HALT" come from a microphone. Here there were police in a volkwagon van and they used their loudspeaker. They gave the guy a ticket for that. I thought to myself damm now that is doing you job. You would never see any of the Police officers follow the llaws to this exstent in the U.S. Hey maybe that is one of our problems. The Germans from my experience follow the law to a degree much higher than we do in the U.S. This also brings me to another time I was almost arrested for fighting or shall I say arguing with under cover police officers in Berlin. I was driving a volkwagon convertibe and all of the sudden these guys cut me off and get out of there car. It was unmarked and they flashed some badge of a sort but what I really remeber it was like a paper. They proceded to give me a ticket. For what ya thinking, for not having the boot put over the top that was down. Who in the us has a convetible that always pouts the boot on when the top is down. I thought these guys were bullshititng with me and I got really angry. Well I almost got arrested till one guy started explaining to me in English. I know how to speak German but this worked and I calmed down. Now that was another experience of how they hold the law. I cant complain the law is the law.

User avatar
Reader3000
Member
Posts: 2125
Joined: 10 Nov 2002 16:01

Post by Reader3000 » 04 Feb 2003 11:17

It's strange that no one of the German members posted here before. Now I do my part: HALT means STOP on traffic signs, because in the 30s and 40s there was no use of STOP on traffic signs. It means stop, to rest, HALTEN means to hold some thing.
I'm courious about the riddle's solution.

Return to “Translation help: Breaking the Sound Barrier”