Proof the Nazis considered Hungarians as "Aryan"

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BlackWatch1
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Proof the Nazis considered Hungarians as "Aryan"

Post by BlackWatch1 » 14 Apr 2018 21:51

I saw an earlier thread from 12 years ago there was a discussion on whether the Nazis considered Hungarians as "Aryan". Well here is proof they did.

Here is the old thread:
https://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=105567

An interesting Aryan/German Blood Certificate issued to Anna Utaria Kurucz who was born in Zvornik, Bosnia of Hungarian/German heritage (Perhaps Serbian and/or Bosnian heritage also if you go back further in the family tree). It was issued by the Office of Family Research and is an Examination Result. It is a Small Ancestry Certificate, and states that the holder is of German Blood an [Aryan], and is neither a Mischling 2 Grades
[ Half Breed / Mongrel ] or Mischling 1 Grades-Jude [ Half Breed / Mongrel ] Jew. The reverse traces the lineage back to the grandparents of the father and mother. The entries are verified by the PFARRAMT stamp [ the Parish or Priests office ].Her father was born in Bácsszentiván, Serbia. Her fathers parents were born in Prigrevica, Serbia. The origin of the grandparents from the mother's side (Karl and Maria Gruber): Rehberg/Böhmerwald, Sudetenland. (Was renamed Srní after WW2 during the ethnic cleansing of Germans in Eastern Europe). When she was issued this she was living in Vienna, Austria and working as a saleswoman during WW2.
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Dr Eisvogel
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Re: Proof the Nazis considered Hungarians as "Aryan"

Post by Dr Eisvogel » 24 Apr 2018 22:51

BlackWatch1 wrote:I saw an earlier thread from 12 years ago there was a discussion on whether the Nazis considered Hungarians as "Aryan". Well here is proof they did.

Here is the old thread:
https://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=105567

An interesting Aryan/German Blood Certificate issued to Anna Utaria Kurucz who was born in Zvornik, Bosnia of Hungarian/German heritage (Perhaps Serbian and/or Bosnian heritage also if you go back further in the family tree). It was issued by the Office of Family Research and is an Examination Result. It is a Small Ancestry Certificate, and states that the holder is of German Blood an [Aryan], and is neither a Mischling 2 Grades
[ Half Breed / Mongrel ] or Mischling 1 Grades-Jude [ Half Breed / Mongrel ] Jew. The reverse traces the lineage back to the grandparents of the father and mother. The entries are verified by the PFARRAMT stamp [ the Parish or Priests office ].Her father was born in Bácsszentiván, Serbia. Her fathers parents were born in Prigrevica, Serbia. The origin of the grandparents from the mother's side (Karl and Maria Gruber): Rehberg/Böhmerwald, Sudetenland. (Was renamed Srní after WW2 during the ethnic cleansing of Germans in Eastern Europe). When she was issued this she was living in Vienna, Austria and working as a saleswoman during WW2.
Dear BlackWatch1,

my intervention is not related to the general question did the Nazis consider Hungarians as Aryan.


My questions are related to to this specific document.

1.) I think correct spelling of her name would be Anna Maria Kurucz and not Anna Utaria.

2.) Is there anywhere in the document explicit classification of her paternal ancestors as Hungarians or did you just derive it from the etymologically Hungarian surname Kurucz?

3.) In fact Bácsszentiván where her father was born and Prigr.[evicza] Sv. Iván where her grandfather and grandmother were born are one and the same village, nowadays Prigrevica.

4.) Since that village was overwhelmingly German inhabited are you sure that her paternal ancestors enumerated in the document declared/considered themselves as Hungarians? For example in 1900 in the village there were 4812 Germans and only 195 Hungarians.

5.) Among the Germans in Bácska region there were also people with Hungarian and Slavic surnames, who were part of German communities.

6.) The Donauschwaben from that village might know did the Kurucz family consider itself German or Hungarian.
http://www.dvhh.org/batschka/village/Ba ... ntiwan.htm

7.) You can see that already among the original German settlers in the village there were people with etymologically Slavic (Gurka, Kollo, Valenta) and Hungarian surnames (Knesity, Toth).
http://www.dvhh.org/batschka/village/Ba ... ectory.htm

Best regards,
Eisvogel

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