Reichskanzlei Thread

Discussions on the propaganda, architecture and culture in the Third Reich.
Mister S
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Mister S » 30 Jun 2017 18:21

Thank you, Br. James for the interesting information on Lammers' rank and office! They are quite helpful.

Regarding the cabinet room, what I meant was that it wasn't the main cabinet room, meaning the main one located in the Mittelbau, shown below. It certainly was a cabinet room as you said.
Image

Sort of a wording error on my half :).


I do know where another office is, Wilhelm Brückner's office. It is located in a similar location adjacent to Lammers' office. Wilhelm Brückner was one of Hitlers chief adjutants, and I am almost certain this is the location of his office (maybe I am wrong):
Wilhelm Brückner office map.jpg


And Wilhelm Brückner's Office:
Wilhelm Brückner's office.jpg
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Br. James
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Br. James » 30 Jun 2017 22:22

Dear Mister S,

Many thanks for locating the office of SA-Obergruppenführer and Chief Personal Adjutant to the Führer Wilhelm Brückner in the Mittelbau, right opposite the office of Dr. Lammers. Though he was a very early Party Member and SA leader (he stood with Hitler among the defendants at the Putsch treason trial in 1924), Brückner didn't occupy this elegant office in the New Reichschancellery very long -- he was dismissed from service in Hitler's Inner Circle in October of 1940 and sent to the Army! I presume Brückner's successor as Chief Personal Adjutant to the Führer -- SS-Obergruppenführer Julius Schaub -- also inherited this office in the Mittelbau.

Best regards,

Br. James

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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Mister S » 01 Jul 2017 21:10

Br. James wrote:Dear Mister S,

Many thanks for locating the office of SA-Obergruppenführer and Chief Personal Adjutant to the Führer Wilhelm Brückner in the Mittelbau, right opposite the office of Dr. Lammers. Though he was a very early Party Member and SA leader (he stood with Hitler among the defendants at the Putsch treason trial in 1924), Brückner didn't occupy this elegant office in the New Reichschancellery very long -- he was dismissed from service in Hitler's Inner Circle in October of 1940 and sent to the Army! I presume Brückner's successor as Chief Personal Adjutant to the Führer -- SS-Obergruppenführer Julius Schaub -- also inherited this office in the Mittelbau.

Best regards,

Br. James


Thanks for the info regarding Brückner and his army transfer. I do believe it was Julius who did inherit the office, maybe that is why I was sort of conflicted in regards to ownership of that office.

This was the hallway outside of Brückner's office:
rk_536.jpg


This hallway lead to a waiting room before entering Hitler's office, both the hallway and this room are shown on the floor basic floorplan, which can be seen in my above post.

Waiting Room (wartezimmer):
rk_536.jpg


Waiting room (wartezimmer) door to the hallway leading to Brückner's office:
541 Wartezimmer.jpg




Regards,
Mister S
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Br. James
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Br. James » 02 Jul 2017 17:34

Dear Mister S,

Can you identify on the schematic where the two "waiting rooms" shown in the two photos above were situated?

Many thanks,

Br. James

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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Mister S » 10 Jul 2017 21:08

Br. James wrote:Dear Mister S,

Can you identify on the schematic where the two "waiting rooms" shown in the two photos above were situated?

Many thanks,

Br. James


Hello Br. James,

Sorry for the late response, here it is:
Hallway.jpg


Here is another image of the waiting room:
waiting room seating.jpg

The door shown in this image leads to a corridor which then leads into Hitlers office, which can also be seen on the schematic.


Kind Regards,
Mister S
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Br. James
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Br. James » 31 Jul 2017 17:15

Wonderful information, Mister S -- thanks so much for providing it! One further question: the photos above appear to include two different "waiting rooms;" can you identify on the map where the room with this caption was: "Waiting room (wartezimmer) door to the hallway leading to Brückner's office:"?

Many thanks again,

Br. James

Mister S
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Mister S » 03 Aug 2017 04:00

Br. James wrote:Wonderful information, Mister S -- thanks so much for providing it! One further question: the photos above appear to include two different "waiting rooms;" can you identify on the map where the room with this caption was: "Waiting room (wartezimmer) door to the hallway leading to Brückner's office:"?

Many thanks again,

Br. James


They are the same from my understanding, perhaps I may have misconception the door that was "leading to Brückner's room", as it may just be another place in the chancellery. Now that got me thinking! Thanks for the extra check.

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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Br. James » 04 Aug 2017 21:08

The 'waiting room' with the round table in the center of the room has very different ceiling moldings and floor tile pattern from the 'waiting room' with the sofa, small round table and side chairs placed into one corner of the room. The double-doors in each room are also quite different in design.

Thanks, as always,

Br. James

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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Geoff Walden » 08 Sep 2017 21:54

This may have been discussed before, but I couldn't find it, at not in the detail I'm looking for.

Has anyone here done - or seen - a detailed analysis of the surviving bronze eagles from the Reichskanzlei, that were taken by various units of the victorious Allies in 1945, and are in museums today (or maybe even in private collections)? What I'm looking for is a list that identifies conclusively where each of the surviving eagles came from, inside the NRK. Myself, I'm getting really confused as I try to compare the eagles in period photos to the eagles that survive. The only one I'm really sure about is the eagle that was above the building entrance from the Ehrenhof, which is the one in Moscow now (the "droop-wing" eagle).

I'd like to see what others have said about the original locations of the eagles now in the Imperial War Museum in London and the US Air Force Museum in Dayton, OH. I've also seen photos of another surviving "spread-wing" eagle that doesn't seem to be either of these, and another one that was in a private collection in New Jersey in the 1980s.

Are there any other NRK bronze eagles in other museums? Exactly how many of the original NRK eagles survive today?

I've seen several photos that identify surviving bronze eagles as having come from Hitler's office in the NRK. How many such large bronze eagles were actually in his office?

Thanks,

Geoff
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Vicctor » 12 Sep 2017 13:56

[quote=

Are there any other NRK bronze eagles in other museums? Exactly how many of the original NRK eagles survive today?
[/quote]

Central Frontier Museum of the Federal Security Service of Russia.
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Br. James
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Br. James » 13 Sep 2017 20:29

In addition to this question regarding the NRK Eagles, one wonders whether the Eagles on the facades of the Führerbau and the Verwaltungsbau der NSDAP in Munich -- both the large ones on the exterior of the buildings and any that were in prominent positions in the buildings' interiors -- still survive today? And what of the Eagles on the facade of the Brown House, or on the Air Ministry Building in Berlin are still extant? Since each example would have probably been an individual, original artwork by either Prof. Kurt Schmid-Ehmen or Prof. Richard Klein, one would assume that such pieces would tend to still exist...somewhere!

Br. James

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Geoff Walden
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby Geoff Walden » 14 Sep 2017 01:36

Thanks very much, Vicctor! I have some other photos of this eagle, but I didn't know where it is. This appears to be the eagle that was above the doorway leading from the Mosaic Saal into the Runder Saal, as the similar eagle now in the USAF museum was over the doorway on the other side of the Runder Saal, above the doorway leading from the Marmor Galerie into the Runder Saal. *IF* I am interpreting period photos and plans correctly ... I make no claim to be any sort of expert on the NRK.
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby muller1945 » 14 Sep 2017 20:14

There were three bronze eagles in the new reichs chancellery. The court yard of honor eagle is in moscow, the eagle from the round salon is in the US air force museum and the hall of the mosaics eagle is in the imperial war museum london. The small eagle from hitlers office may be in a private collection tho who knows.

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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby palaisfan » 18 Sep 2017 07:15

Mister S wrote:
Br. James wrote:Many thanks, Mister S! I had not considered that those "skylights" could have been lighting fixtures all along that hallway, but a closer look reveals that there were no obvious wall sconces or lamps there to illuminate that space, which was totally without windows. The aerial photos also do not show any skylights along the Mittelbau, but as you suggest, that doesn't confirm that that long hallway photo was not taken on the second floor of that central section of the building.

From period letterhead we know that Dr. Lammers' office address was "Voss Straße 6," which was as you noted on the schematic, west of Hitler's office. Appropriately, a little further west was the large Cabinet Hall intended for the use of Hitler meeting with his senior cabinet members --
which would also have been very convenient for Lammers' purposes. And Dr. Meissner's office would have been at Voss Straße 4, the building entrance of which was just two doors west of his office. According to these positions, it does not seem verifiable that "the Presidential and Reich Chanellery staffs were on the east wing, along with military adjutants of the Wehrmacht, while party was on the west" -- given that Lammers' office and the Cabinet Hall were adjacent to the west wing. It would also seem that Reichsleiter Bormann and his Party Chancellery staff would have been located right there in that same building; Bormann would not have wanted the offices of Bouhler, Lammers and Meissner to have been situated closer to the Führer -- 'the center of power' -- than his office was!

Here's something you might find of interest: on page 37 of "Hitlers Neue Reichskanzlei: Haus des Großdeutschen Reiches 1938-1945" published by Arndt-Verlag, Kiel, in 2002, are a photo of Meissner's office taken from a slightly different angle, and a photo of Lammers' office. Though both photos are in black-and-white, they are quite informative.

I do agree with Palaisfan that Himmler's office was not in the Reichschancellery complex; I believe his Berlin office was located in the Gestapo Headqauarters building a Prinz Albrecht Straße 8, and right next door, on the corner of Wilhelmstraße was Heydrich's office with the SD leadership in the former Prinz Albrecht Palace.

With great respect,

Br. James


Very interesting information, Br. James. As for the mailing address being either Voßstraße 4 or Voßstraße 6, those would of course be the only two mailing addresses. And because the Reich Chancellery had mail rooms on both the east and west wings, Lammers and Meissner would of course have to have their address at either one, Meissner of course being located in the east wing. In Ronald Pawly's book on the Chancellery, it is mentioned that the West wing of the Chancellery housed administrator offices along with Dr. Lammers and his staff. It is also noted that the military adjutants had their offices in the East wing. The Party Chancellery headed by Bouhler was located on the upper floor of the Mittelbau. Palaisfan mentioned Bormann's office, but I have still seen not the slightest bit of evidence for that. Perhaps I am too skeptical of its existence?

Only if it is very convenient for you, could provide the picture of Lammers' office? I have never seen a picture that is certainly his office in the Neue Reichskanzlei, even though he was the highest official present in the building besides AH.

--------------

I have some more informative information regarding the Chancellery and its everyday functions, translated from a newspaper article:

The front of the New Reich Chancellery measures four hundred meters, and no one can walk by without wondering what goes on inside…
The officials in their brown uniforms behind the massive swinging doors know the government executives well. They recognize their faces and the way they move, whether they are taciturn or friendly…On many days three generals’ coats hang on coat hooks in the waiting room. On other days, the checkroom is filled with the coats of Reichsleiter, Gauleiter, SA officials, or armament inspectors. Sometimes civilians also check their coats.
The elevators are completely automatic, the doors opening and closing noiselessly. Unerringly the guards appear and demand passes. Slowly the eye accustoms itself to the unusual dimensions of Speer’s building, which are constantly surprising the visitor. Anxiety generated by the long corridors gradually dissipates. One begins effortlessly to orient oneself, and what one hardly noticed on first pass becomes clear: the relationship between location and way.
The visitor walks over thick carpets that muffle all sounds. Here and there, yellow signs point to the air-raid shelter.
There are more than 400 rooms…In contrast to the size of the chancellery, the number of officials, employees, and workers is small. Only about seventy people are actually performing the tasks of government. The entire staff consists of 250 people, but most are engaged in maintaining the building.
Employees stride up and down the steps with gray folders under their arms. Cleaning ladies with innumerable whirring vacuum cleaners fill the long marble halls. A workman is bent over repairing a damaged spot in the floor…
Chancellery mail roomLike every other corporate office, the mailroom is the first stop for much of the day’s business. Early in the morning the letter carrier brings sacks of mail from the Leipzigerstraße post office to the third floor chancellery mailroom. Many letters and packages are immediately forwarded to their ultimate destination, while others must be evaluated. In 1932, 51,500 pieces of mail arrived. In 1933, the volume increased to 375,000. As unemployment decreased, the flood of letters diminished to 200,000 annually and has stabilized at that number...Every letter, no matter how important, is logged in. If the Chancellery cannot answer it, the letter is forwarded to the appropriate agency. In all cases the sender receives an acknowledgment with a file number so that he may at any time inquire regarding the status of his correspondence.
Along with official communications, every day brings a mountain of letters from individuals. People from every corner of the Reich, and foreigners as well, write about personal concerns. A glance at today’s pile reveals the peculiar address designations: ‘To the Führer’s cabinet,’ ‘to the Reich government and revered Führer,’ ‘To his Excellency the noble, high-born Führer,’ ‘To the Obersalzberg in Berlin.’ The huge outpouring of opinion provides a glimpse of the trust accorded Adolf Hitler by a broad swath of the German population. The volume of letters from foreign countries is substantial, and the foreigners’ letters, by and large, have the highly reverent addresses…
An ordinary chancellery day passes swiftly. Couriers come and go. The grand rooms are often empty, but the offices are constantly busy, even more so since the war began…One little office holds a cot for the night concierge. The telephone switchboard is in operation twenty-four hours. A chancellery official is always on call. The chancellery never closes.

-Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels published the first issue of Das Reich May 26th, 1940. Goebbels himself wrote many of the front-page articles in an attempt to reach the educated classes, both inside and outside of Germany. Erich Peter Neumann’s best-known article for Das Reich was a March 1941 report on the Warsaw Ghetto, in which he described “the horribly repulsive variety of all Jewish types in the East.” Neumann wrote Nazi propaganda for other publications, including the Berliner Tageblatt and the Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung.

Source: http://www.stevenlehrer.com/excerpt.htm

A Mail Room:
Image
A conference room in the East Wing (not the cabinet hall):
Image
Press Cheif Dr. Otto Dietrich's office in the Chancellery (also published in the same newspaper article):
Image
Restaurant for staff in the West Wing:
Image
Telephone operators run the Chancellery's advanced communication system 24/7:
Image

These images could be of Lammer's office in the New Reich Chancellery, I am just unsure (ignore the date Bundesarchiv date stamps):

Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-C16771_Hans_Heinrich_Lammers.jpg
Bundesarchiv_B_145_Bild-F051632-0037,_Hans_Heinrich_Lammers.jpg
lammers.jpg
hans lammers office.jpg


Mister S.,

Just some remarks here on your good posts since have figured out some items about this, and my posts have been mentioned.

Your three pictures of Lammers I think are all the same office. The key to some of this is the so-called Weimar Extension, the Seidler building. Eweiterungsbau. It is neither the `old RK' or the `new RK' but depending on your source, will get lumped in with the `Old Reich Chancellry.' Strictly speaking, that is two edifices -- Weimar Extension, and Reich Chancellor's Palace. There are three main phases of the Extension -- it is completed December 1930 and opened January 1931. During this time the Staatsekretary office was on the first floor above the ground floor facing Wilhemstrasse (same as Hitler's balcony floor). This phase ends with the Speer-Troost reconstruction of Dec 1933-May 1934. Speer in Dec 1933 refurbished the great `Red Hall' of the Extension of Weimar days as Hitler's new office. The big one you see that is not the new RK pictures all know and where most meetings took place till 1939 unless in the Reichskanzler Palais . Strictly speaking, Speers work is in the Extension at this time. (Troost reconstructs the Reichskanzler Palace immediately after, starting in January 1934). Under Speer Lammers office was moved to a refashioned Extension building four window cabinet room, now on the garden side. This holds till the New Reichskanzlei construction demolishes this part of it. Then you have the final office -- the one in the west wing of new RK as yourself pointed out (I had not been sure where Lammers new RK office was---good eye.) Your end of the war picture strongly suggests that Lammer's book-case cabinet (whatever call it?) was simply moved from the Extension office to the new RK one. It looks like the same one behind him in the 1930's era pictures.

On Bormann's office -- it wasn't in the new RK in administrative terms. It appears to be in the Party Chancellery which originally had offices in Borsig No.1 Voss strasse, then ended up at No.63 Wilhemstrasse.(That is where it is in the Battle of Berlin, when Bormann is writing about its damage and bombing.) Since the Borsig rooms are unmarked in any new RK plans, it is hard to tell which would be his office.

The Borsig was the Vice Chancellory of van Papen; after the Night of the Long knives, immediately, and mean immediately, Speer is commissioned to reshape it into the HQ for a relocated SA command, Meissner's Presidential Chancellery, and Party Chancellery of Bouhler. Except for the SA, which stays in the Borsig -- the others all get offices in the new RK.

The big plaques in No.4 and No.6 Voss Strasse actually identify the associated departments unambiguously, but as you noted, they form the main mailing addresses. The other would be No.2 Voss Strasse (Borsig; the term "No.`1" Vosse Strasse had vanished with the new RK); and the No.78 Extension, and No. 77 Reichskanzlerpalais.

Incidentally, I have never been able to identify the location of the first picture your post shows as a "A conference room in the East Wing (not the cabinet hall)" -- you correctly note it is not the large globe Reich Cabinet Hall. Presumably the caption "east wing" must be taken at face value, but unless it is on the ground floor of the Weimar Extension somewhere facing Wilhemplatz (there is a suspect long series of windows there), have not been able to figure it out.

Hope that clarifies,

Palaisfan

This is the same room as your "conference room in East wing" --- notice the similar form and that the tapestry and shape of its tree is the same on the far wall. So wherever it is, it has a minimum of three windows, more likely four windows given dimensions.
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palaisfan
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Re: Reichskanzlei Thread

Postby palaisfan » 18 Sep 2017 07:37

Christoph Neubauer wrote:Hello Mister S.

I did not expect you to reply to my post and see you are not a bad person after all ;-). Even though this is not the forum to discuss the issues about pirating I just would like to reply briefly to your idea regarding Steam or PlayStation. The problem is that you can RiP any 3d model and texture once it is downloaded to your computer, so it doesn’t matter in what way the 3d data gets on your pc, once it is in your graphic card you can rip it. If it comes to VR unfortunately the 3d content has to be first on the user’s computer to be able to play back.
The only way of securing the content is to provide it inside a VR arcade. This means a shop or an office were people can go to and watch the Chancellery on the hardware provided.
This also means that it’s ensured only the best possible hardware is used to run the model. This is important since the Chancellery used to contain more the 2.000 rooms. On top of it comes that my model covers 250 Years of the construction history. I did not only model the New Reich Chancellery but also the Chancellery of the Weimarer Republik as well as the one of Bismarck and even the original version of 1735 and the changes made to it by Fridrich Schinkel for Furst Radziwill in 1822.
The questions of Br. James show me that people are still very interested in the Chancellery. I am therefore also trying since many years to build up a recherché center just for the history of the Chancellery. In 15 years of recherché, I found so many interesting construction plans and photos never seen before. Almost every important room is documented.
I do have construction plans of the air conditioning located in the 3rd level underground. Photos of Hitlers private bathroom, the generators located under the terrace of the New Reich Chancellery, Hitlers private model room (to present the models of Germania) in the New Reich chancellery, the heaters, kitchens, escalator and even the Car –Lift and the engine room located underneath the lift.
Many of the photos are simply not named properly in the archives. This means I had to go through millions of photographs dated 1850-1953 to find the ones showing the Chancellery.
I created my first films (the ones you know) using 250 Photos and plans. Now my archive contains more than 13.000. You can imagine how much more there is to show. Not to mention the more than 21.000 documents (invoices, quotes, reports) I copied from the official files of the Chancellery.
Unfortunately, Germans are very scared of the topic of the Chancellery. Therefore, I am looking for an opportunity to present my recreation permanently in the US.


Regards
Christoph


Greetings Christoph Neubauer,

It is a pleasure to see you on this thread. I am well aware of your work and have purchased the DVDs as they came out with total amazement. In fact, when discovered your website and ordered them, they caused me to abandon the current project I had been tinkering with on writing about the rooms and chronology things like the unusual construction with the Borsig being joined to supplement the few books out on the subject. This from what I had managed to figure out from rough translation of clues on plans, long study of pictures and mis-identified photographs like you also mentioned. It was always more of a hobby and practice puzzle and I never got further with it. Your work made it all obsolete and redundant, LOL. I waited to see what later war would describe as had also studied the bunker and how inaccurate the locations usually were described - Sure enough, your segment DVD on the Fuehrerbunker construction had already "discovered" any of the items I had thought new. It is a shame indeed if you are running into trouble in proceeding to the next step and the interiors, but will surely be worth the wait.

What really intrigued is that you said your work extended to the earlier Weimar Erweiterungsbau era - Extension building. To some frustration, have never come across a ground plan (only the upper floor from old 1928 book on the Reichskanzlerpalais) of the Seidler building. I wonder if you might humor me and say if I am correct that this forms the ground lower hall of the building corresponding to the hall with the offices (and Hitler balcony Chancellor's office) one floor above? It really seems to me these two pictures form a unit, the doors seem to be common to the two rooms and curious to test my observations. My guess is the first one - which call AnnexEntrance - if you go out to the left you come out onto Wilhemstrasse through the well known door with the two No.78 lamps by it, to left (south) of balcony. The second picture almost looks like it is further beyond, to the right on the first picture. The next room over. The doors seem to match?

Danke großartig for any light shed,


Palaisfan

(Captions are mine, just guesses)




AnnexEntranceHallperhaps.jpg
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