How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

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Hans1906
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by Hans1906 » 04 Mar 2021 16:19

The special knowledge of some experts here in this forum is as always impressive, I take my hat off very gladly!

Thank you for all the information. :thumbsup:


Hans1906
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DavidFrankenberg
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by DavidFrankenberg » 29 Jun 2021 18:43

Konrad Heiden in his Hitler describes Ballerstedt like a very offensive man, a troublemaker.
When an equally popular orator, an engineer of the name of Ballerstedt, heckled Hitler vigorously, some infuriated National-Socialists flogged him out of the hall.
Looks like Ballerstedt made Hitler mad at him...
. At the head of a band armed with heavy oak sticks, he forced his way into the meeting of a rival for popular favour, one Ballerstedt. Brandishing their sticks. Hitler and Esser stormed the platform and blows rained down on Ballerstedt. The police capitulated once again. The poor sergeant- major knew that Hitler had far more influence with his chiefs than he had, and he begged timidly : “ Herr Hitler, you see yourself, there are dead bodies here. Pray bring your men to reason ! ” Hitler cast a triumphant glance over the battlefield and declared graciously : “ Very well, the end has been achieved. Ballerstedt won’t speak any more to-day ! ” Then he marched off with his men. But Ballerstedt did not suffer the flogging in silence. True, six months elapsed, but finally Bavarian justice was obliged to call Hitler to account and to condemn him to three months’ imprisonment. He was immediately let off two months in virtue of the so-called probation period—that is to say, he need not serve them if he behaved himself well for five years ;

Linkagain
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by Linkagain » 13 Sep 2021 22:17

Note on the english Wikipedia there is a picture alleged to be Otto Ballerstedt.
However
1} he is a US Army OFFICer {US on his uniform lapel}
2} The star on his lapel is that of the US General Staff Corps

Ingrid1
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by Ingrid1 » 14 Sep 2021 11:32

Based on my research, Hitler was arrested once not imprisonment. He was found guilty of treason and sentenced to five years in Landsberg Prison, where he dictated Mein Kampf to fellow prisoners Emil Maurice and Rudolf Hess. On 20 December 1924, having served only nine months, Hitler was released.

Chopper009
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by Chopper009 » 22 Nov 2021 08:22

The slap on the wrist that Hitler and his co-defendants received was the byproduct of the Weimar judicial system that was dominated by conservative nationalists whose careers began under the Kaiserreich. The trial's chief presiding judge, Georg Neithardt, was a noted conservative and had an established pattern of giving harder sentences for left-wing political crimes and lighter ones for crimes committed by the right. He had already given Hitler a lenient sentence in 1922 for stirring up a riot. The chief judge treated the defendant Erich von Ludendorff with extreme deference, even reportedly said before the trial that the former general would be acquitted because Germany still needed him. Neihardt allowed von Ludendorff to replace an earlier interrogation which demonstrated his knowledge of the coup with one that suggested he was ignorant of the enterprise's treasonable details. Neihardt's fellow judges were also quite sympathetic to nationalist causes and thus more amenable to lenient sentences. Hitler would later claim that the lay judges would only convict Hitler and the other defendants (minus von Ludendorff whose wartime deeds had put him above reproach) if they were given a mild sentence with the possibility of early parole.

The political biases of the judges dovetailed with the general disinterest on the part of the prosecution to try Hitler to the fullest extent of the law. The chief prosecutor Ludwig Stenglein was a man disinclined for direct conflict which made him a poor choice for the trial, which soon devolved into a media circus as the judges allowed Hitler free reign over the courtroom proceedings. The Bavarian state government wished for the trial to go away quickly in no small measure because a lengthy trial could expose the involvement of the NSDAP and the Bavarian State Police and the Reichswehr before the Putsch. This further constrained the number of witnesses that the prosecution could call to the stand and the state did not attempt a thorough investigation for more incriminating evidence against the defendants. Stenglein's plea statement included a paean to Hitler's patriotism and sincere belief that he needed to combat the forces of international Marxism.

The light sentences for Hitler and von Ludendorff's acquittal did not go unnoticed in the German press and created a scandal as it gave Hitler a national platform at very little personal cost to himself. Even Neithardt admitted to one of the prosecutors that letting Hitler harangue the courtroom for four-hour stretches was something of a mistake. Despite his earlier claims of Hitler's fidelity to Germany, Stenglein tried to ensure that Hitler served his full term and pointed out during the parole process the gravity of Hitler's crimes and his poor conduct in Landsberg, but the Bavarian Supreme Court was no more willing listen to these very serious indictments than their colleagues in the earlier criminal trial.

Sources

Gordon, Harold J. Hitler and the Beer Hall Putsch. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1972.

Kershaw, Ian. Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris. New York: Norton, 1999.

Mannheim
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by Mannheim » 22 Nov 2021 21:21

"He had already given Hitler a lenient sentence in 1922 for stirring up a riot." What was the lenient sentence?
Kein Irrtum ist so groß, der nicht seinen Zuhörer hat.

LAstry
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by LAstry » 26 Feb 2022 23:41

a related link on Ballerstadt
viewtopic.php?t=167248

DavidFrankenberg
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by DavidFrankenberg » 23 Apr 2022 20:52

Mannheim wrote:
22 Nov 2021 21:21
"He had already given Hitler a lenient sentence in 1922 for stirring up a riot." What was the lenient sentence?
That was for the Ballerstedt incident.
Hitler spent one month in jail from 24 june till 27 july 1922 (Kershaw). Bavarian justice was obliged to call Hitler to account and to condemn him to three months’ imprisonment. He was immediately let off two months in virtue of the so-called probation period—that is to say, he need not serve them if he behaved himself well for five years (Heiden).

DavidFrankenberg
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Re: How many times was Hitler imprisoned?

Post by DavidFrankenberg » 23 Apr 2022 20:58

Chopper009 wrote:
22 Nov 2021 08:22
The slap on the wrist that Hitler and his co-defendants received was the byproduct of the Weimar judicial system that was dominated by conservative nationalists whose careers began under the Kaiserreich. The trial's chief presiding judge, Georg Neithardt, was a noted conservative and had an established pattern of giving harder sentences for left-wing political crimes and lighter ones for crimes committed by the right. He had already given Hitler a lenient sentence in 1922 for stirring up a riot. The chief judge treated the defendant Erich von Ludendorff with extreme deference, even reportedly said before the trial that the former general would be acquitted because Germany still needed him. Neihardt allowed von Ludendorff to replace an earlier interrogation which demonstrated his knowledge of the coup with one that suggested he was ignorant of the enterprise's treasonable details. Neihardt's fellow judges were also quite sympathetic to nationalist causes and thus more amenable to lenient sentences. Hitler would later claim that the lay judges would only convict Hitler and the other defendants (minus von Ludendorff whose wartime deeds had put him above reproach) if they were given a mild sentence with the possibility of early parole.

The political biases of the judges dovetailed with the general disinterest on the part of the prosecution to try Hitler to the fullest extent of the law. The chief prosecutor Ludwig Stenglein was a man disinclined for direct conflict which made him a poor choice for the trial, which soon devolved into a media circus as the judges allowed Hitler free reign over the courtroom proceedings. The Bavarian state government wished for the trial to go away quickly in no small measure because a lengthy trial could expose the involvement of the NSDAP and the Bavarian State Police and the Reichswehr before the Putsch. This further constrained the number of witnesses that the prosecution could call to the stand and the state did not attempt a thorough investigation for more incriminating evidence against the defendants. Stenglein's plea statement included a paean to Hitler's patriotism and sincere belief that he needed to combat the forces of international Marxism.

The light sentences for Hitler and von Ludendorff's acquittal did not go unnoticed in the German press and created a scandal as it gave Hitler a national platform at very little personal cost to himself. Even Neithardt admitted to one of the prosecutors that letting Hitler harangue the courtroom for four-hour stretches was something of a mistake. Despite his earlier claims of Hitler's fidelity to Germany, Stenglein tried to ensure that Hitler served his full term and pointed out during the parole process the gravity of Hitler's crimes and his poor conduct in Landsberg, but the Bavarian Supreme Court was no more willing listen to these very serious indictments than their colleagues in the earlier criminal trial.

Sources

Gordon, Harold J. Hitler and the Beer Hall Putsch. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1972.

Kershaw, Ian. Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris. New York: Norton, 1999.
Remember that far-left also used riots at the time. The far-left took power in Munich for some weeks in 1919 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_Soviet_Republic.
The political climate was hot, very hot !
Far-right was allied to the army and the bourgeoisie in order to restore clam and order.
Hitler was sent to prison in 1923 only because he acted like a daredevil, defying the establishment and the army.

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