Were Poles considered Aryans?

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George L Gregory
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Were Poles considered Aryans?

Post by George L Gregory » 13 Apr 2021 00:11

Correct me if I’m wrong, but didn’t some Jews escape persecution and prosecution by gaining “Aryan papers” by pretending to be non-Jewish Poles?

Also:
A member of any minority group demonstrates his ability to serve the German Reich when, without surrendering membership in his own specific Volk group, he loyally carries out his civil duties to the Reich, such as service in the armed forces, etc. Reich citizenship is, therefore, open to racially related groups living in Germany, such as Poles, Danes, and others. It is an altogether different matter with German nationals of alien blood and race. They do not fulfill the blood prerequisites for Reich citizenship. The Jews, who constitute an alien body among all European peoples, are especially characterized by racial foreignness. Jews, therefore, cannot be seen as being fit for service to the German Volk and Reich. Hence, they must necessarily remain excluded from Reich citizenship.
Aryan is thus the one man who looked free from, the German people, strange racial impact is blood. Deemed to be a stranger here, especially the blood of the living room and in the European settlement of Jews and Gypsies, the Asian and African breeds, and the aborigines of Australia and America (Indians), while, for example, a Swede or an Englishman, a Frenchman or Czech, a Pole or Italian, if he is free of such, even that is foreign blood strikes, when used, must therefore be considered severally liable, he may now live in his home, in East Asia or in America or he likes a U.S. citizen or a South American Free State be.

Carl Schwamberger
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Re: Were Poles considered Aryans?

Post by Carl Schwamberger » 13 Apr 2021 00:57

The short answer is yes, some did obtain identity papers making them a Pole or whomever else they could pass as. This moved them from one level of persecution to another. That is its not much use obtaining papers saying you are a Pole, then are packed and killed cause you are identified as Polish 'inteligensta'. The Germans had a extermination program to kill off the educated and leaders among the Poles.

As for the rest, its a rotten mess I won't touch.

Linkagain
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Re: Were Poles considered Aryans?

Post by Linkagain » 13 Apr 2021 19:48

The only Poles considered Aryans were young children kiddnapped from their Homes because they resembled the "Aryan" idea which the Germans tried to Brainwash them to forget their Polish heritage and become Germans.....

George L Gregory
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Re: Were Poles considered Aryans?

Post by George L Gregory » 15 Apr 2021 20:20

Linkagain wrote:
13 Apr 2021 19:48
The only Poles considered Aryans were young children kiddnapped from their Homes because they resembled the "Aryan" idea which the Germans tried to Brainwash them to forget their Polish heritage and become Germans.....
That's not true. Read the paragraph above - Poles (without any German ancestry) were regarded as Aryans living elsewhere.

Also, after the Nuremberg Laws were passed in 1935, Poles were used as examples of a minority living in Germany who were of related blood (Aryans) and were eligible for Reich citizenship.
A member of any minority group demonstrates his ability to serve the German Reich when, without surrendering membership in his own specific Volk group, he loyally carries out his civil duties to the Reich, such as service in the armed forces, etc. Reich citizenship is, therefore, open to racially related groups living in Germany, such as Poles, Danes, and others. It is an altogether different matter with German nationals of alien blood and race. They do not fulfill the blood prerequisites for Reich citizenship. The Jews, who constitute an alien body among all European peoples, are especially characterized by racial foreignness. Jews, therefore, cannot be seen as being fit for service to the German Volk and Reich. Hence, they must necessarily remain excluded from Reich citizenship.
Historian Diemut Majer:
In the period that followed, the Blood Protection Law underwent further expansion. Thus, the second implementing regulation to the Blood Protection Law broadened its prohibitions to cover those former Polish citizens who had acquired German citizenship—which affected primarily the so-called ethnic Germans—whereas the prohibition against race mixing did not apply to the great mass of Poles (persons with so-called protected status, or politically reliable foreigners). However, the Blood Protection Law was not aimed solely at Jews but also at other "undesirable" "non-Germans." Hence the call for racial purity, upon which the "inner unity" of a people was said to rest, targeted only superficially the neutralizing of the Jews; it actually took aim at "aliens" of all kinds. Thus the prohibition on marriage, as already noted in the introduction, applied not only to marriages contracted between Jews (including Jewish Mischlinge) and "persons of German blood" and between Jews and Mischlinge of the second degree but was also interpreted beyond the wording of the law as being a desideratum (de facto a requirement) for all marriages between "citizens of German or racially related blood" in cases in which "offspring that would endanger the preservation of the purity of German blood could expected to result." Such a threat was assumed to be latent in all liaisons between Germans and "inferior" "non-Germans," including Gypsies, blacks and their descendants, and later the peoples of Eastern Europe. In order to prove that this threat did not exist in liaisons between "partners of different races," it was necessary to obtain a "certificate of fitness for marriage" from the Public Health Office. Poles, too, although in principle deemed to be among the Aryans, were included in the prohibition on race mixing. There was a de facto prohibition against marriage of (stateless) Poles and Germans as well as marriages of Poles who had acquired Germans citizenship and all other "non-Germans." There was no law enunciating such a prohibition. However, it was put into practice all the same by the tried-and-true method of internal administrative guidelines, which dictated that registry officials simply should not record such marriages, in order (and this was of particular significance in the Annexed Eastern Territories) "to achieve a complete separation . . . [of the German citizens] from their Polish surroundings.
"Non-Germans" Under the Third Reich, pages 102-103.

Historian Christian Gerlach:
Explications of who was supposed to be Aryan, if that concept was used, differed slightly. Addressing the diplomatic corps in 1934, Minister of the Interior Frick stated that all "non-Jewish members of all European peoples" were Aryan. Poles were defined as Aryan, but "gypsies" and "Negroes" were not. The view that Poles were Aryans can be found in documents of occupation authorities, and non-Jewish Poles were told as much. The former applied to Slavs in general — Russians, Ukrainians, Belorussians and Serbs — whom earlier theorists also considered Aryan.
The Extermination of the European Jews, page 157.

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