information about radio berlins war time work

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Ezboard

information about radio berlins war time work

Post by Ezboard » 29 Sep 2002 15:46

Sanjay
Visitor
(1/10/01 3:34:43 pm)
Reply information about radio berlins war time work
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radio berlin carried lot of propoganda work during war time and also radio berlin alloted frequency for subhash chandra bose the indian freedom fighter and he made transmission in five or six different indian languages.i would like to know at what frequency did it operate and when did it stop at the end of war.
also i would like to know about radio broadcast and all its aspect during wwii in germany.

Marcus Wendel
Webmaster
Posts: 927
(1/10/01 8:37:49 pm)
Reply Re: information about radio berlins war time work
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Sanjay,

Try "Hitler's Airwaves: The Inside Story of Nazi Radio Broadcasting and Propaganda Swing" by Horst J. P. Bergmeier & Rainer E. Lotz.

/Marcus


Sanjay
Visitor
(1/12/01 9:01:29 am)
Reply other information about radio propoganda .
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marcus,
thanks for suggestion.i would try to locate one copy of book in our library if possible.
during war time the british authorities of india had by special legal decree prohibited public from listening to radio berlin or any other radio broadcast from any axis country.
any body caught listening to radio broadcast from axis country was liable for 3 to 6 months imprisonment or fine of Rs,500/- or both.police and homeguard were given special powers, and to arrest such person no warrant from magistrate was neccessary(which was mandatory had they followed normal laws of country)also radio set of person listening was to be seized if had commited such offense more than three times
but implementation was problematic and people came around ingenious ways to avoid authorities eyes when listening to axis broadcast
marcus i would like to know any such restrictions were in place in germany if so what were they?
also did any other country prastised such measure

Simon Turner
Visitor
(2/28/01 9:43:57 pm)
Reply Information about Radio Berlin's War-Time Work
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I hope this information is not too late. I have only just joined!

Subhas Chandra Bose's Azad Hind movement ran three clandestine radio stations from German territory, namely: Free India Radio, Free Moslem Radio and National Congress Radio. They broadcast in many different Indian languages, as well as English. Their programmes were produced in Berlin and beamed to India via powerful German shortwave transmitters.

There was also a clandestine station in Italy, known as Radio Himalaya run, with Italian assistance, by Mohammad Shedai.


It was certainly illegal to listen to foreign broadcasts in the Third Reich. A decree to that effect was introduced in September 1939 and remained in force until it was lifted by Admiral Doenitz's government in May 1945.

Hope this helps.

Simon

Sanjay
Visitor
(3/1/01 11:23:03 am)
Reply thanks and what was penalty?
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Hello Simon Turner,
thanks for your brief but good information.
but what was penalty imposed by third-reich for listening foreign radio broadcasts?
was its execution in hand of regular police or gestapo or SS

Simon Turner
Visitor
(3/1/01 8:19:13 pm)
Reply Penalties for Listening to Foreign Stations
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At the beginning of the war, Germans found guilty of listening to enemy broadcasts were imprisoned. Later, several such listeners were executed. The Nazis were especially worried that people would pass on to others what they had heard on foreign stations. Despite the penalties, many Germans listened to London and Moscow. Some also listened to the British "secret stations" which pretended to be run from German soil by anti-Nazis. As this was a "political crime" I imagine that the Gestapo rather than the ordinary police were most active in catching such people.

By the way, although listening to enemy broadcasts was not illegal in Britain, it was illegal to spread "false" rumours. Several Britons were prosecuted for spreading rumours allegedly broadcast from Germany by Lord Haw-Haw and for distributing stickers advertising the so-called New British Broadcasting Station, a clandestine station based in Germany.

Simon

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