Philosophy & Naziism

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Nagelfar
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Philosophy & Naziism

Post by Nagelfar » 12 Sep 2002 10:41

To what extent was the philosophical stance of Naziism Nihilistic? in such instances as the claim that it was anti-intellectual. was it a form of Nihilistic Vitalism? to what amount is the appearance of Intellectualism in Naziism suppressed for modern politically & ideologically motivated reasons? what about such openly pro-nazi thinkers as Martin Heidegger, Gottlob Frege, Ludwig Klages, Alfred Baeumler, Ernst Krieck, and even Alfred Rosenberg & 'proto-nazi' Dietrich Eckart?

...And going from philosophy to philology, (before anyone asks), how did "Nazism" become popularized as the 'proper spelling' of a two word contraction which is pronouned with two "I"'s much like the word "Skiing"? shouldnt "Naziism" be the proper spelling?

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Post by Qvist » 12 Sep 2002 11:46

...And going from philosophy to philology, (before anyone asks), how did "Nazism" become popularized as the 'proper spelling' of a two word contraction which is pronouned with two "I"'s much like the word "Skiing"? shouldnt "Naziism" be the proper spelling?


I don't think so. "Nazi" is itself a contraction, likely derived from the German contraction "Nazismus". And I frankly have never detected a double-i pronounciation of the word "Nazism"?

To what extent was the philosophical stance of Naziism Nihilistic? in such instances as the claim that it was anti-intellectual. was it a form of Nihilistic Vitalism?


Well, that depends on the extent to which NS can be said to have had a philosophical stance. It should be recalled that NS certainly was not a elaborated philosophical system, far from it. However, the same broad descriptive tags - such as nihilistic and vitalistic - that can be applied to philosophical systems can of course also be applied to less elaborate systems of thought and values, if in a less precise sense.

Was NS nihilistic? I think this is a debatable tag. One main interpretation of NS focuses on it's preoccupation with power, to the extent that NS is seen as aiming for nothing more. In this perspective, nihilistic would be an appropriate descriptive term. Other interpretations though focus on clear objectives and values within NS beyond the pursuit of power, which of course implies arguing against calling it a nihilistic thought system. At the very least though, I think one could point to the behavior of the regime in the final phase of the war as indicative of a nihilistic outlook - when the struggle was pursued to the end without any rational objective, and where the destruction of Germany even seems to have been a goal of the regime.

Vitalistic is I think easier. If NS absorbed one philosophical impulse in it's formulated ideas and general outlook, it was that of vitalism. The celebration of physical prowess, glorification of struggle and war, the primacy of action over thought and the close juxtaposition of these with the meaning of existence is a clearly vitalistic stance. Nor can it be ignored that the common distinguishing trait among almost all philosophers who took a sympathetic view of NS is some sort of vitalistic philosophical position.

to what amount is the appearance of Intellectualism in Naziism suppressed for modern politically & ideologically motivated reasons?


The question of intellectual content in NS is basically a corollary of the different main approaches of interpretation. And these naturally reflect a whole range of motivations and general views.

I think it would be more accurate to say that some major currents of European philosophy has perhaps been unfairly lumped into the NS paradigm, to the extent that they have been neglected as a legitimate and valuable contribution to European thought that does not (and did not) neccessarily imply a Nazi political view.

what about such openly pro-nazi thinkers as Martin Heidegger, Gottlob Frege, Ludwig Klages, Alfred Baeumler, Ernst Krieck, and even Alfred Rosenberg & 'proto-nazi' Dietrich Eckart?


Philosophers, like everyone else, are sometimes more or less compelled to take sides in current affairs. The views they take may or may not be related to their philosophical views. In any case, that a given philosopher is pro-something does not in itself imply that his philosophy has any influence on the political force he is supporting. For instance, Sartre was an outspoken Stalinist. As we all know, Stalinism does not exactly bear much resemblance to Sartre's philosophy. :)

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Post by Dan » 12 Sep 2002 14:16

I don't think so. "Nazi" is itself a contraction, likely derived from the German contraction "Nazismus". And I frankly have never detected a double-i pronounciation of the word "Nazism"?


In American English, it's pronounced "Natsy-ism"

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Nagelfar
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"Nazism"

Post by Nagelfar » 13 Sep 2002 00:35

I don't think so. "Nazi" is itself a contraction, likely derived from the German contraction "Nazismus". And I frankly have never detected a double-i pronounciation of the word "Nazism"?


firstly, thanks for your imput... But want I meant with the word was, even in german, wouldnt "Nazismus" as a contraction of "National Sozialistische" where the "I" was from "Sozial, I.E. Nazi is singular, the german addition of "-ismus" shouldnt absorb a singular "I" sound..?

In british engish is it "Nazi-Sm" then??

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Post by Qvist » 13 Sep 2002 11:00

Hello Dan, Nagelfar

firstly, thanks for your imput... But want I meant with the word was, even in german, wouldnt "Nazismus" as a contraction of "National Sozialistische" where the "I" was from "Sozial, I.E. Nazi is singular, the german addition of "-ismus" shouldnt absorb a singular "I" sound..?


Well, it does. Language is not a logical thing, not even the German language. And certainly not the English language :)

In british engish is it "Nazi-Sm" then
??

I'm not English, so I don't really know. I have always assumed that "Nazism" is pronounced with a singular I sound and can't recall having heard it pronounced with a double sound, but Dan tells us otherwise as far as the US is concerned. Someone from Albion could perhaps enlighten us on this?

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Scott Smith
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NAZISM

Post by Scott Smith » 13 Sep 2002 16:27

I've always pronounced it Nots-Ism, but one hears Nazi-Ism quite a bit. I don't recall how the media prefers to pronounce it, but Dan is probably right.
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