Recommended Reading

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Haven
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Haven » 01 Oct 2015 03:14

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Radical Perspectives on the Rise of Fascism in Germany, 1919-1945

Edited by Michael N. Dobkowski and Isidor Wallimann

To understand the complex phenomenon of fascism and its success in Germany requires an integrated analysis of the economic, class, and power dimensions that led to the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the ascension to power of the Nazi party. The contributors to this volume, including a number of scholars from East and West Germany whose works appear in English for the first time, collectively construct such an analysis.

This book is intensely political (eg, THE LEFT) but it does captivate.

PDF's of each author: http://surface.syr.edu/books/25/

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Haven
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Haven » 05 Oct 2015 20:57

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Hitler's Germany: Origins, Interpretations, Legacies
By Roderick Stackelberg
Routledge
London
1999

Hitler's Third Reich often seems like an aberrant historical episode that defies rational explanation. Hitler's Germany seeks to provide context to this period by viewing the development of Nazism from the broader perspective of nineteenth- and twentieth-century German history. The book's interpretive focus offers insight not only into how Nazi Germany evolved, but also into its underlying causes and reasons.

Starting with the great ideological movements of the past two centuries, Roderick Stackelberg examines the cultural, political, and economic factors that led to the Nazi's rise to power in 1933. He presents detailed coverage of Germany up to 1945, paying special attention to World War II and the Holocaust. The book concludes with a discussion of the legacies of Nazism, the bitter disputes it has provoked among German historians, and the evolving meaning of the Nazi experience today.

PDF of the first 21 pages: http://samples.sainsburysebooks.co.uk/9 ... 484387.pdf

Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=iVGFA ... es&f=false

I own the entire book on PDF.-- Haven

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Haven
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Haven » 06 Oct 2015 01:52

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German Voices: Memories of Life during Hitler's Third Reich
Frederic C. Tubach (Author), Sally Patterson Tubach (Contributor)
University of California Press
2011

What was it like to grow up German during Hitler’s Third Reich? In this extraordinary book, Frederic C. Tubach returns to the country of his roots to interview average Germans who, like him, came of age between 1933 and 1945. Tubach sets their recollections and his own memories into a broad historical overview of Nazism—a regime that shaped minds through persuasion (meetings, Nazi Party rallies, the 1936 Olympics, the new mass media of radio and film) and coercion (violence and political suppression). The voices of this long-overlooked population—ordinary people who were neither victims nor perpetrators—reveal the rich complexity of their attitudes and emotions. The book also presents selections from approximately 80,000 unpublished letters (now archived in Berlin) written during the war by civilians and German soldiers. Tubach powerfully provides new insights into Germany’s most tragic years, offering a nuanced response to the abiding question of how a nation made the quantum leap from anti-Semitism to systematic genocide.

Google Books: https://books.google.com/books?id=wrnMG ... &q&f=false

I have this in PDF. -- Haven

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Haven
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Haven » 29 Oct 2015 17:56

Haven wrote:Image

Suicide in Nazi Germany

by Christian Goeschel

The Third Reich met its end in the spring of 1945 in an unparalleled wave of suicides. Hitler, Goebbels, Bormann, Himmler and later Goering all killed themselves. These deaths represent only the tip of an iceberg of a massive wave of suicides that also touched upon ordinary lives. As this suicide epidemic has no historical precedent or parallel, it can tell us much about the Third Reich's peculiar self-destructiveness and the depths of Nazi fanaticism.

Christian Goeschel looks at the suicides of both Nazis and ordinary people in Germany between 1918 and 1945, from the end of World War I until the end of World War II, including the mass suicides of German Jews during the Holocaust. He shows how suicides among different population groups, including supporters, opponents, and victims of the regime, responded to the social, cultural, economic and, political context of the time. He also analyses changes and continuities in individual and societal responses to suicide over time, especially with regard to the Weimar Republic and the post-1945 era.

Richly grounded in gripping and previously unpublished source material such as suicide notes and police investigations, the book offers a new perspective on the central social and political crises of the era, from revolution, economic collapse, and the rise of the Nazis, to Germany's total defeat in 1945.
Here is a PDF of the book: http://pdf.k0nsl.org/S/Suicide%20In%20N ... eschel.pdf

vinty
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Re:

Post by vinty » 26 Jan 2016 19:45

Ryan81 wrote:For me, it is Raul Hilberg's phenomenal 3rd edition (2003) of "Destruction of the European Jews"

It's not cheap by any means but if you can, GET IT. You will not find a more detailed book on the Holocaust.

Not only that, it comes in a great boxset with three hardback volumes.
Is it true that in his first edition of "Destruction of the European Jews" he wrote that documents ordering the Holocaust and signed by Hitler were in existence?.

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sarahgoodson
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by sarahgoodson » 10 Mar 2016 22:54

The Third Reich: A New History by Michael Burleigh is a great read.

Ivan Denisovich
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Ivan Denisovich » 12 Mar 2016 11:14

Stephen Marks Warum folgten sie Hitler? Die Psychologie des Nationalsozialismus (Why Did They Follow Hitler. The Psychology of National Socialism). It's refreshing take on Third Reich and good all around book worthy of reading.
Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.

George Santayana.

Br. James
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Br. James » 15 Jan 2017 21:18

I'm having a wonderful time with "Hitler at Home" by Despina Stratigakos, published by Yale University Press in 2015. For those of us who enjoy delving into Hitler's Inner Circle and the buildings he was apparently proud of, this author is right on the money! Lots of seldom-seen interior photos of buildings -- at least by me -- with rich descriptions of how those buildings and their furnishings and interiors came to be. And the depth of research on Frau Professor Gerdy Troost, her vast amounts of work, and her relationships with Hitler, Speer and others is just what I constantly look for. I absolutely recommend this fine book!

Br. James

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Annelie
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by Annelie » 15 Jan 2017 22:30

Br. James,

Thankyou for the recommendation.
Shall attempt to find and buy the book.

bjackson
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Re: Recommended Reading

Post by bjackson » 09 Dec 2018 23:34

I really enjoyed reading Tooze's Wages of destruction... but I'm still not clear what he means when he uses the term "rationalization", A little help please? thanks in advance

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