German WW2 war dead memorials

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Hans1906
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Hans1906 » 01 Feb 2021 18:42

Probably mentioned here in the forum before:

Onlineprojekt Gefallenendenkmäler (G/E/P) http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/index.htm


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„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

Leibstandarte_fi
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Leibstandarte_fi » 06 Feb 2021 21:59

Nice!

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Hans1906
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Hans1906 » 06 Feb 2021 22:21

Ja, also av. in english and also polish language, partly...

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Leibstandarte_fi » 12 Feb 2021 02:16

Sry I do not get the point of this: Hans1906 ?

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Hans1906
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Hans1906 » 12 Feb 2021 17:15

Leibstandarte_fi,

Open the start page: http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/index.htm

At the top right of the home page you can see the American, English, and Polish flags.
The click on the flags leads you to an info page, unfortunately the whole online project is only available in german language.

Finnland: http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/covers_intl/finnland.htm

Question answered ?
(Please excuse my short post above, no hard feelings, sorry.)

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„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Leibstandarte_fi » 23 Feb 2021 19:17

Wholy Crap! Very nice!!!

Sorry about earlier posts... I was "Slightly" under the Influence of Estonian Vodka... :D

Ty of those!

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Hans1906
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Hans1906 » 07 May 2022 19:59

Another link:
Here you will find information and photos about war memorials in Schleswig-Holstein, Hamburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania that were created after World War I. It is not about completeness, but about exemplary examples. Please select a letter category from the menu on the right.

DENK MAL!
Source and link: https://www.denk-mal-gegen-krieg.de

Very well done, recommended.


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„Im Leben gibt’s die Bösen und die Guten. Und die dazwischen, das sind die Bagaluten.“

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by henryk » 07 May 2022 20:57

A German War Cemetery in Canada
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/2018/kitc ... o_cdn.html
Google translation. See source for names and pictures.
Kitchener (German War Cemetery), Province of Ontario, Canada
ZIP: N2A 2G8
German War Cemetery at Woodland Cemetery in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

Central inscription:
Rest in this burial ground
187 German war dead
1914-18, 1939-45
they became 36 places in Canada in 1970
moved to here

Inscription on a wall between two wooden grave markers:
These grave markers were made by German prisoners of war
for two deceased comrades
erected in Gravenhurst/Ontario Cemetery
and placed here as a reminder.
these dead rest on the burial ground

The graves of German WWII POWs were transferred to Kitchener in 1970 from 36 different cemeteries across Canada (as well as German WW1 POWs from seven different cemeteries). Today there are no graves or memorial stones anywhere else in Canada. Only on the site of the former Medicine Hat camp in Alberta is there still a memorial stone commemorating the camp and August Plaszek, who was murdered there on July 22, 1943, and Dr. Karl Lehmann remembered. They were killed by comrades because of their anti-Nazi attitude. Four fellow prisoners were therefore executed as murderers on December 18, 1946. Today the perpetrator and the victim rest together in the Kitchener Cemetery.
At the war cemetery are also two wooden grave markers made by comrades that stood in Gravenhurster Cemetery. They were brought to Kitchener and repositioned there. Major Bach's grave marker bore the swastika in the iron cross carved at the top until 1980, before it was removed after protests. The grave marker of the soldier Ertz bears the motif of an eagle at the top.

The interned civilians were mostly seafarers from merchant ships. The refugees coming from Britain were apparently Jews. In Great Britain, German Jewish refugees were interned in the early years of World War II and only released after international protests. Whether this was also the case in Canada is not noted. However, they were recorded as Germans in Canada and found in the documents of David Carter's authorities.

Thanks to Mr. David Carter for permission to use additional detainee dates and additional names from his book: Behind Canadian barbed wire. This book contains many details about life in Canadian captivity and the murders at Medicine Hat camp. See: www.djcarter.ca The list of names is also printed in the book by former German prisoners of war in Canada: Karl Heinz Taeuber - "German prisoners of war behind Canadian barbed wire".

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Annelie » 07 May 2022 21:28

I made it an point to visit the Kitchener German War Graves.
A few photos to add to this post.
Kitchener War Graves.jpg
IMG_1148.JPG
IMG_1151 - Copy.JPG
IMG_1152.JPG
IMG_1156 - Copy.JPG
IMG_1156 - Copy.JPG
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by Annelie » 07 May 2022 21:29

Major Wilhelm Bach.jpg
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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by CogCalgary » 09 May 2022 16:41

henryk wrote:
07 May 2022 20:57
A German War Cemetery in Canada
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/2018/kitc ... o_cdn.html
Google translation. See source for names and pictures.
Kitchener (German War Cemetery), Province of Ontario, Canada
ZIP: N2A 2G8
German War Cemetery at Woodland Cemetery in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

Central inscription:
Rest in this burial ground
187 German war dead
1914-18, 1939-45
they became 36 places in Canada in 1970
moved to here

Inscription on a wall between two wooden grave markers:
These grave markers were made by German prisoners of war
for two deceased comrades
erected in Gravenhurst/Ontario Cemetery
and placed here as a reminder.
these dead rest on the burial ground

The graves of German WWII POWs were transferred to Kitchener in 1970 from 36 different cemeteries across Canada (as well as German WW1 POWs from seven different cemeteries). Today there are no graves or memorial stones anywhere else in Canada. Only on the site of the former Medicine Hat camp in Alberta is there still a memorial stone commemorating the camp and August Plaszek, who was murdered there on July 22, 1943, and Dr. Karl Lehmann remembered. They were killed by comrades because of their anti-Nazi attitude. Four fellow prisoners were therefore executed as murderers on December 18, 1946. Today the perpetrator and the victim rest together in the Kitchener Cemetery.
At the war cemetery are also two wooden grave markers made by comrades that stood in Gravenhurster Cemetery. They were brought to Kitchener and repositioned there. Major Bach's grave marker bore the swastika in the iron cross carved at the top until 1980, before it was removed after protests. The grave marker of the soldier Ertz bears the motif of an eagle at the top.

The interned civilians were mostly seafarers from merchant ships. The refugees coming from Britain were apparently Jews. In Great Britain, German Jewish refugees were interned in the early years of World War II and only released after international protests. Whether this was also the case in Canada is not noted. However, they were recorded as Germans in Canada and found in the documents of David Carter's authorities.

Thanks to Mr. David Carter for permission to use additional detainee dates and additional names from his book: Behind Canadian barbed wire. This book contains many details about life in Canadian captivity and the murders at Medicine Hat camp. See: www.djcarter.ca The list of names is also printed in the book by former German prisoners of war in Canada: Karl Heinz Taeuber - "German prisoners of war behind Canadian barbed wire".
Only five deaths listed in New Brunswick.Wonder what they did with the bodies contained in more than 100 graves at Camp Ripples.Author lives in Medicine Hat Alberta.Tried calling,will send him an email.

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by CogCalgary » 09 May 2022 18:10

Talked to the author based in southern Alberta.Camp Ripples sources are based on a book Both Sides of the Wire by Ted Jones,New Ireland Press,1989.

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Re: German WW2 war dead memorials

Post by rafizigdon » 12 May 2022 08:29

How does Germany remember Matthias in World War II? How does she express this in her public, media and artistic debate?
Guilt, Suffering and Remembrance examines the culture of remembrance and commemoration of the German dead in World War II and analyzes the tension that exists in this culture between the motif of guilt and the motif of national suffering and suffering.
It stands for the incarnation of the commemorative culture from the end of World War II onwards, its various manifestations in the two German states that arose in 1949 following the Cold War - the Federal Republic of Germany (Western Democratic State) and the German Democratic Republic (Eastern Communist State) - and the similarities between patterns. And the official commemoration that has crystallized in these two countries despite their ideological rivalry.

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