Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Discussions on every day life in the Weimar Republic, pre-anschluss Austria, Third Reich and the occupied territories. Hosted by Vikki.
gary7344
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: 21 Mar 2008 16:54

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby gary7344 » 23 Mar 2008 12:20

Unterseeboot crew celebrating with Becks. I scanned this image from Buchheims' book; U-Boat War
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

scheckter
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: 16 Mar 2010 18:59

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby scheckter » 16 Mar 2010 19:27

Berliner Kindl (brewery opened in 1872) and Schultheiss (1842) beers would have been popular in the Berlin area and Köstritzer (schwarzbier) also in eastern areas of Germany.

User avatar
Bernaschek
Member
Posts: 127
Joined: 16 Nov 2008 11:51
Location: New Delhi

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Bernaschek » 27 Mar 2010 20:25

a few more general things on beer, without especial source study, rather "oral history" from my younger years.

In 1841 the "Schwechater" brewery in Schwechat brewed the first modern Lagerbeer (untergärig) as we know it today. This had quite a succes - Lager means storage - this beer could be stored longer ans as such transported further than older beertypes.
Beer had not really been store- or transportable before, and therefore small breweries dotted the landscape.
In roughly the same period as the "Lager-Beer" was developed, railways and other means of transport like steam-river boats and coastal freighters began to develop - and the concentration of the beer market began.
Bottled beer was also a development of the industrial revolution - cheaper bottles and technologie to fill and especially technology to close them airtight (at a sustainable price).
A lot of developments is also created by laws like taxation and so on; in some coutries today beer in the restaurant is still hardly more expensive than in the shop, in Austria and Germany there is a vast price difference.

The Concentration started even before WW I . For example I did a construction Job in the building which had housed the brewery that served my village and neighbouring ones.
I learned that about 1912 the heiress married the boy from the big "Linzer Bier" Brewery from the state capital. The brewery was closed and the valley served with beer from Linz, brought by train, the building became a textile mill.

I some areas like the Innviertel, which were by and large not industrialised and not crossed by major transport axes, a lot more of small breweries survived.
Other typical survival situations were when the brewery was just one enterprise of "early capitalists" - if the mill or the lumber business, even the soft drink business like in the case of "Schartner" in my area (Coke did not take over everything) brought money home, it was not necessary for the beer production to generate more than a "0" balance to survive -if someone in the family, who ran it, was interested in it.

Nowadays the bigger breweries who had survived and in Austria had built two big clusters where bought by international trusts and the small ones soldier on, if well run carried by a renewed notion for quality and pride in regional products.
And there are even some reopened small breweries and "Braugasthäuser", where the restaurant customer is drinking the fresh beer .

After the war beer was still rather hard to come by in rural upper Austria (american zone), my "Wirt" (inkeeper) had told me - he had walked home from somewhere near Prague, crossing the danube with a stolen log to cling too - and such evaded captivity - so he concentrated on his farm and renovating his inn with his own hands - still same wood banques and paneeling today - and about two years later he was able to secure beer supply through regular channels and reopened.

In the deep cellars of the "Zipfer Brauerei", near Lambach, there was a KZ outpost from Mauthausen, something with V-Waffen, if I remember right, and there was quite a nasty discussion in the 80s to make a memorial

not exactly on topic, but I hope you considered it informative

andi
"nuts"

Peter K
Host - Allied sections
Posts: 3621
Joined: 12 Jul 2006 19:17
Location: Poland

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Peter K » 03 Sep 2010 11:09

Were they drinking Lech?:

(July 1410)

"What's going on?"
"We received a present from the Grand Master"
"Danke, danke. But Master in what?"
"In war probably"

(playing war)

"But the King beats the Queen!"
"Only in Germany!"


User avatar
Landser
Member
Posts: 431
Joined: 16 Mar 2002 19:28
Location: Sunnyland only

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Landser » 03 Sep 2010 15:29

[ Were they drinking Lech?:]


Sorry,but I think good ole Walesa wasn't around then.

Besides we're talking about beer,not some imitation.

Peter K
Host - Allied sections
Posts: 3621
Joined: 12 Jul 2006 19:17
Location: Poland

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Peter K » 03 Sep 2010 15:58

But they were singing: "Haben wir auch Piwo getrunken".

So probably they did. And it was actually better than Bier / beer.

User avatar
Landser
Member
Posts: 431
Joined: 16 Mar 2002 19:28
Location: Sunnyland only

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Landser » 03 Sep 2010 16:53

Domen121 wrote:But they were singing: "Haben wir auch Piwo getrunken".

So probably they did. And it was actually better than Bier / beer.



That's a new one to me.I looked up for songs with this phrase in it, but in vain.
Are you starting a new polish historical myth?



PS Isn't piwo also a Chech' word.

Peter K
Host - Allied sections
Posts: 3621
Joined: 12 Jul 2006 19:17
Location: Poland

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Peter K » 03 Sep 2010 18:40

I looked up for songs with this phrase in it, but in vain.


So you are not very good in looking up for songs:

Ade, Polenland:

http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=412

"Haben wir auch Piwo getrunken".

PS Isn't piwo also a Chech' word.


No. Piwo is Polish. Pivo is Chech.

uhu
Member
Posts: 380
Joined: 05 Jan 2004 13:00
Location: US

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby uhu » 04 Sep 2010 01:34

I couldn't get thru all the posts without popping a cool Wheat Beer, with a slice of lemon of course. After the war my parents would sew up and send CARE packages to relatives in Germany. One realative owned a small beer brewery and all he asked for were a few samples of American beer for him to put thru his little lab and examine. All he wrote my Dad was, "If I made beer like that they'd put me in jail". I first visted Germany in 1952 with parents and the first small village we stayed in the relatives would give me an empty jug, a mark, and send me to the local gasthaus to have it filled with draft beer. When I got back they'd always look at the jug's open top and say I was shortchanged. They must have known. Anyway, I was twelve years old at the time, so I guess there was no drinking age? On my last visit I asked a cousin I was drinking with if he wasn't worried about being stopped for DWI. He simply said, "Here in germany we have a saying -- Carry me to my car, I'll drive you home! If you like dark beer try a Spaten Optimator, you almost have to spoon it out its so thick. Nowadays I only drink the wheat beers as they aren't so heavy on the tummy.

Cheers,
Literally

murx
Member
Posts: 647
Joined: 23 May 2010 20:44

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby murx » 18 Sep 2010 00:52

In Germamn submarines "Becks" beer was served ("Beck's Gold"also):

Reference e.g. http://www.uk-muenchen.de/download/wien_vorkrieg.pdf

User avatar
Helmut0815
Member
Posts: 500
Joined: 19 Sep 2010 13:13
Location: Lower Saxony, Germany

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Helmut0815 » 19 Sep 2010 14:30

murx wrote:In Germamn submarines "Becks" beer was served ("Beck's Gold"also)


Well, I don't know what kind of Beck's beer the uboat men drank but certainly it was not "Beck's Gold".
Beck's Gold was introduced in 2002.

User avatar
Landser
Member
Posts: 431
Joined: 16 Mar 2002 19:28
Location: Sunnyland only

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby Landser » 10 Dec 2010 16:01

THe former Adolf brand is now called Lech piwo!

User avatar
323F
Member
Posts: 180
Joined: 02 Aug 2004 22:10
Location: Belgium

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby 323F » 17 Dec 2010 10:31

Don't know wich beer this is, I'm more familiar with the Belgian beers.. :wink:

Looks like DREI EFF Heil or OREI EIF Heil
Image

ManfredV
Member
Posts: 313
Joined: 10 May 2005 10:55
Location: Pirmasens

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby ManfredV » 17 Dec 2010 12:49

Looks more like "Hell" - meaning "fair", "light", "clear". A kind of of mild, malty and more sweet tasting Export or Lager, about 5 - 5,5 % alcohol, which is typical for South Germany, must prefered kind of beer in Bavaria and Franconia.

User avatar
323F
Member
Posts: 180
Joined: 02 Aug 2004 22:10
Location: Belgium

Re: Popular Beer in Nazi Germany

Postby 323F » 17 Dec 2010 14:29

ManfredV, that's correct. Hell is a light colored German beer.
The first word is DREI, the second I can't read good.
Maybe it has something to do with the beersign above, you see also three (Drei) figures. Looks like a propeller or mixer.


Return to “Life in the Third Reich & Weimar Republic”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot]