Mauser MG213 cannon?

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Uninen
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Mauser MG213 cannon?

Post by Uninen » 13 Mar 2004 20:46

Pictures and accurate info on this? Anyone?

All i know about MG213 now is that it has been copied and used by France, UK and USA at least, in their ADEN, DEFA and M-39 cannons..

Also info about the use of BK-50mm cannons on those Me-410:s would be welcome..

Thanks.

Tony Williams
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Post by Tony Williams » 14 Mar 2004 11:36

This is from 'Flying Guns: the Modern Era' by Emmanuel Gustin and myself; it's due to be published at around the end of this month:

"The million-point project was assigned the gun designation MG 213 (Maschinengewehr = machine gun). Politzer's successful design was given the third code letter assigned, and thus became the MG 213C. The cartridge had to be large to develop the required muzzle velocity and the case measured 20 x 135; it actually fired a 112 g shell at 1,050 m/s. While this was being developed, operational requirements dictated the development of a low-velocity 30 mm version in parallel; this became known as the MK 213/30 or just the MK 213 (Maschinenkanone = machine cannon); the 30 x 85 B round fired its 330 g shell at 530 m/s. Incidentally, it will be noted that Germany in the Second World War regarded 20 mm weapons as machine guns, not cannon, and surviving references to the 30 mm version of this gun sometimes describe it as the "MG 213/30"; as it was not adopted, the designation was never officially determined. The Luftwaffe wanted to use the MK 213 for bomber destroying, the MG 213C for bomber defence and for ground attack, the high-velocity 20 mm having a much longer accurate range as well as better armour penetration. Both guns (which weighed 75 kg; the 20 mm was 193 cm long, the 30 mm model 163 cm) could comfortably exceed the 1,000 rpm requirement, the 20 mm reaching 1,200 – 1,400 rpm, the 30 mm 1,100-1,200. Test aircraft installations were made, but the guns were a long way from being production-ready by the end of the war; just ten examples of the final design had been assembled."

The book provides various photos of the gun, and goes on to detail the development of the design postwar in several countries. The French DEFA 540 and British Aden 3M were virtual copies of the Mauser MK 213, although the designs were steadily developed (especially in France). The US M39 was radically redesigned as well as firing smaller ammunition; the Swiss Oerlikon revolvers were also much modified. The current European standard fighter gun, the Mauser BK 27, is a developed version of Anton Politzer's WW2 design.

The BK 5 is described and illustrated in 'Flying Guns: World War 2' (already published). This is an extract:

"The Luftwaffe was slow to adopt aircraft cannon in the 37+mm class, but once they started they took to the concept with more enthusiasm than anyone else. Three different guns saw service - the BK 3,7, BK 5 and BK 7,5, all by Rheinmetall-Borsig - and several more were being developed at the end of the war. BK stood for Bordkanone, a term reserved for this class of aircraft weapon. None of the service guns was designed for aircraft in the first instance; the BK 3,7 was a version of the FlaK 18 AA gun and retained the 37x263B ammunition fired from 6, 8 or 12-round strips, the BK 5 (50x419R) was a KwK 39 tank gun with a 22-round annular autoloader fitted, and the BK 7,5 (75x715R) was similarly based on the PaK 40 anti-tank gun, which was semi-automatic and fitted with a 12-round rotary magazine. All of these weapons were large and heavy in comparison with purpose-designed aircraft guns such as those used by the Soviet air force, and the larger guns saw very little use."

Tony Williams: Military gun and ammunition website and Discussion forum

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 06 Jun 2004 18:18

Why did not the Germans fully develop the MG 213?

Tony Williams
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Post by Tony Williams » 06 Jun 2004 19:51

Time - they only made about ten guns before the end of the war.

Tony Williams

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 07 Jun 2004 17:14

Silly question, of course... :cry: Thank you for the answer, Tony

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