Ju 390 Help!

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gaius
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Re: Ju 390 Help!

Post by gaius » 08 May 2014 19:38

I am glad to see that you are still on the case, Simon. I vaguely remember hearing about this in the news at the time, but the reporting was short on details. At the time I think it was reported to be a BV 222. Thank you for posting this useful information.

Regards,
Gaius

Simon Gunson
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Re: Ju 390 Help!

Post by Simon Gunson » 12 May 2014 00:01

Thanks Gaius I got an email notification of your reply.

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What I find interesting is that there was a pair of all weather ice-free runways at an IJN airstrip on Matua island covered in Whermacht fuel drums of 1943 manufacture. I am at a loss which ship could have landed them here. What I am aware of is that Germany had to perform its own provisioning of bases at Penang and Jakarta etc.



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There seems to be a reasonable inference that Germany was making long range flights to the Kurile islands during 1944. Matua Island unlike Parumshiro to the north was not so fog bound due to the natural volcanic heat of the island.

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The runways there were lit for night operations, were heated by ducted hot water and the airfield also had a powerful 200w Telefunken transmitter with a large capacitor built in Silesia in 1939 (still on site)

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LWD
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Re: Ju 390 Help!

Post by LWD » 12 May 2014 14:24

Simon Gunson wrote:... There seems to be a reasonable inference that Germany was making long range flights to the Kurile islands during 1944. ...
??? You think the mere existance of oil drums constitutes a "reasonable inference" of that particular usage? Your definition of "reasonable" seems to vary considerably with how it is commonly used in English.

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Bader's Briar
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Is THIS a photo of the airfield you were talking about?

Post by Bader's Briar » 26 May 2014 16:37

Simon Gunson wrote:What I find interesting is that there was a pair of all weather ice-free runways at an IJN airstrip on Matua island covered in Whermacht fuel drums of 1943 manufacture. I am at a loss which ship could have landed them here. What I am aware of is that Germany had to perform its own provisioning of bases at Penang and Jakarta etc.

There seems to be a reasonable inference that Germany was making long range flights to the Kurile islands during 1944. Matua Island unlike Parumshiro to the north was not so fog bound due to the natural volcanic heat of the island.

The runways there were lit for night operations, were heated by ducted hot water and the airfield also had a powerful 200w Telefunken transmitter with a large capacitor built in Silesia in 1939 (still on site)
Dear Simon Gunson:

Bader's Briar here...even though, as documented on pages 197 through 199 in the Griehl/Dressel book on the entire He 177 family, which includes a massive amount of documentation on all three of its descendant "truly four-engined" airframe projects, Ernst Heinkel's own statement as what a practical Amerika Bomber would have been in October 1943 was "this", from his viewpoint:

"In our opinion, the Me 264 is a record-breaking aircraft, and does not come up to service requirements for operations in large numbers. The Bv 222 and Ju 290 are far too big and are not bombers, in addition to which the Ju 290 has to be altered to Ju 390 (six engines). This would make the construction effort bigger still. Thus, only the Ta 400 and the He 277 remain as useful operational aircraft" — Dr. Ernst Heinkel, October 1943

...your mention of an "abandoned airfield" on Matua Island in the Kuril chain of the northwest Pacific Ocean DOES seem to be partly backed-up by a photo from Google Earth that I've attached to this reply, from a Google Earth contributor known as "kertelhein", and the suspect metal barrels ARE plainly visible, all "rounded up" and standing at the right of the photo. A 2009 image of Matua Island on Google Earth seems to reveal that the "airstrip" might be some 1.33 km (4,360 ft) long, and runs about as a 8/26 direction runway based on geographic compass directions (not geo-magnetic), almost due east-west.

Now, I have NO idea whatsoever if that "abandoned airfield" on Matua Island in your photo, and the one I found at Google Earth, was built by the WW II Japanese, or later by the Soviets themselves. If there ARE indeed German language-labeled metal barrels on the "abandoned airfield", there could be a remote possibility of those being captured German WW II artifacts re-purposed by the Soviets after WW II in Europe had ended, however unlikely that idea might sound...

...and Japan DID have their own long-range "Project Z" trans-oceanic bomber proposal, of which Nakajima's own IJN-designated G10N Fugaku concept airframe could also have been a type intended to use an airfield in that location.

Just wondering IF you might have seen "kertelhein's" photo before anywhere?

Thanks and Yours Sincerely,

Bader's Briar
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