An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 29 Oct 2021 11:57

New find

Volkssturmeinheit Lambach

https://www.salzburg24.at/news/salzburg ... h-59205178

Volkssturm-Bataillon Liegnitz-Land

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... nitz-land/

Volkssturm-Bataillon X/18 // Volkssturm-Bataillon Lösch
Volkssturm-Bataillon X/23 // Volkssturm-Bataillon ​Zeh
Volkssturm-Bataillon X/30 //​ Volkssturm-Bataillon​ Deltau
Volkssturm-Baukompanie Kreis Tuttlingen
Volkssturm-Baukompanie Kreis Rottweil

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... /&pageNo=1

Volkssturm-Bataillon 20/14

https://login.waidhofen.at/getpdf/9814/8

Volkssturm-Bataillon 32/383 [Liberec]

https://dspace.tul.cz/bitstream/handle/ ... sAllowed=y

Das Kriegsende 1945 in Varel: das Ende des Zweiten - Holger Frerichs

Volkssturm-Bataillon Varel - Land 37/115

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=6M ... AF6BAgkEAI

Die letzten Tage: die militarische Besetzung Osterreichs 1945 - Theo Rossiwall

Volkssturm-Bataillon Dornbirn

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=pi ... AF6BAgeEAI

Raus aus Königsberg!: wie 420 ostpreussische Jungen 1945 - Karl Springenschmid

Volkssturm-Bataillon Lützow

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Nv ... AF6BAgYEAI

Landesbauernführer: Band 1

Volkssturm-Bataillon Passenheim

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=m- ... AF6BAhAEAI

Uns geht es scheinbar wie dem Führer ...: Zur späten - Francesca Weil

Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/52

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=l7 ... AF6BAhIEAI

Gersthofen, 969-1969: Festschrift zur Tausendjahrfeier - Johannes Krausse

Volkssturm-Bataillon Gersthofen

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=VB ... AXoECFYQAg

Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung: 1985

Volkssturm-Bataillon 5/65 Kempen

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=dk ... AXoECDUQAg

Volkssturm-Bataillon Menden

http://geschichtsverein-troisdorf.de/wp ... 16_www.pdf

Volkssturm-Bataillon Lugnitz-Land - Stadt Steinau/Oder, Kreis Wohlau

https://www.archiwum.instytutpileckiego ... ition/1724
Last edited by Germanicus on 30 Oct 2021 03:36, edited 11 times in total.

Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 30 Oct 2021 01:18

Der Deutsche Volkssturm im Sudetenland

Kries Liberec

A total of 300,000 combat-ready personnel were registered in the Sudetenland, of which the number of Volkssturm as of 1 November in the district of Liberec was 16,517 and in Greater Liberec 8,661 men.

Registration took place on Saturday, October 28 from 3 pm to 9 pm, on Sunday, October 29 from 8 am to 4 pm and on Monday October 30 from 5 to 10 pm at eighteen offices throughout Liberec. The German People's Tower in Sudetenland. The annual implementation regulations for the Erlass
des Führers, in: Die Zeit, roč. 10, 1944, No. 280, p. 3; The composition of the Volkssturms begins, in: Die Zeit, roč. 10, 1944, No. 288, p. 3.

Liberci VS 1.JPG

A total of 18 Volkssturm-Bataillones were established in the Liberec district, in addition to the mentioned Liberec battalions, they were also Volkssturm-Bataillones in Hrádek nad Nisou, Chotyn, Chrastava, Horní Chrastava, Mníšek, Stráž nad Nisou, Vratislavice nad Nisou - Proseč, in Hodkovice nad Mohelkou (the battalion also included the areas of Osečná, Dolánky, Český Dub, Druzcov, Heřmanice, Dlouhý Most) and a battalion
of Hitlerjugend members from the entire district with a strength of 1,027 young men
. In him 589 boys from Greater Liberec were also included.

Liberci VS 2.JPG

In total, it was registered in the Liberec district at the age of 16–18 years 918 members, 15,405 members aged 19–60, 74 older volunteers, 109 younger volunteers and 11 members of the foreign workforce. In SOkA Liberec, f. Domobrana - district management Liberec, inventory No. 88,
card. 13, Erfassungsergebnis des Deutschen Volkssturmes, 1. 11. 1944 -ZIMMERMANN, Volker: Sudetští Němci v nacistickém státě
[Sudeten Germans in the Nazi state]

Liberci VS 3.JPG

Members of the militia of all units were subject to strict records, which they recorded not only current data, but especially information on education, examinations passed, on the weekly number of hours in employment, data on affiliation to any of the NSDAP organizations,
special skills (eg driving licenses, knowledge of foreign languages, Morse code alphabet, typing, shorthand, completed anti-aircraft protection or ambulance training services) and, last but not least, information on the possible possession of a firearms license, or performed military service.
Part of the information was then recorded in a special military books, serving as a personal document to members of the Volkssturm. As part of the records they had members of the militia also receive identification marks with name, personal number and unit designation.

Liberci VS 4.JPG

Although the primary task of Volkssturm units was to defend the homeland, it included their activities and auxiliary work, ie securing convoys of refugees, security patrols or the protection of fields against theft of agricultural crops.

The solemn oath of the Volkssturm in the Imperial Sudetenland took place uniformly on Sunday November 12, 1944 in conjunction with the
reminder of the fallen. In the district of Liberec, this act took place in several places, on the square in Stráž nad Nisou, Český Dub,
Chrastava, Hrádek nad Nisou and Liberec. In the capital of the county, oaths are mandatory all battalions of Greater Liberec participated,
including units from Vratislavice nad Nisou, Proseče nad Nisou.

According to the complexity of tasks and workload, the security of units was also graded provisions. If the men of Volkssturm fought alongside regular army units, they were entitled to care, food, salary and a household allowance, as were soldiers Wehrmacht. Entitlement to provisions
arose for militiamen even during service longer than three days the territory of the county, when they were to receive similar allocations as in the case of the army.

Volunteers over the age of 60 could, at their own request, be reassigned to the fourth group, in direct combat however, members of the 1928 and younger years were not allowed to deploy either.

As late as May 3, 1945, allocations were set for members of the Volkssturm under light load (for example, at training), which did not differ much from the conditions of the Wehrmacht. Men were entitled to 500 g of bread per day, per week 640 g meat, 190 g fat (62 g butter, 94 g margarine,
34 g lard), 70 g jam, 70 g honey, 125 g cheese or 250 g of cottage cheese, 115 g of sugar, 63 g of coffee substitute, 0.8 l of milk, 3.5 kg of potatoes and 6 g of spices. However even in cases of longer deployment, the rations usually did not arrive and the members of the militia had to fight for themselves take care of yourself.

Providing the equipment for the Volkssturm, which he had to do, became quite problematic each member to obtain either by himself or from the warehouses of NSDAP. Regulation of 25 January 1945, the members of the militia who did not have their own uniform, issued against confirmation
of all available clothing and equipment of SA units, as well as backpacks, blankets, cookers, bread boxes, bottles or cutlery. For the needs of the militia the remaining items were also served, diligently collected over the years by the command of the local strike forces - engineering, sanitary and intelligence devices, tools, skis and bicycles. Still growing the lack of clothing and military equipment, however, took its toll on the whole of Germany society. On the morning of January 20, 1945, it took place in connection with the equipment militia in the Sudetenland a special
collection in which members of the Volkssturm, The Wehrmacht and the Hitler Youth searched all households to find anything could be used as equipment. In particular, parts not yet handed in were confiscated clothing, fabrics, gloves, helmets or other headgear, earmuffs, boots, shoes,
pots, binoculars or compasses. Hunting items has also found use in Volkssturm weapons and their ammunition by private German owners who had to hand them over at the nearest gendarme station.

The German authorities planned to return the weapons to the original owners after the end of the war, which was treated careful inventory, including the weapon number. Compensation should be provided for damaged or lost equipment. Only foresters were not obliged to hand over their weapon; in the case of the Czech minority, voluntary was preferred surrender of weapons.

As part of the militia, several special units were also established in the Liberec district, namely driving, intelligence, engineering and ambulance, which were directly based on their operation from the organization, membership and guidelines of strike units and were subordinate to the
battalion for special units.

A total of 65 cavalry squads were formed in the Imperial Sudetenland, where where SA the cavalry no longer worked or the members stood at the front, he was to be elected leader the most qualified member in the field of care and breeding of horses, for example from the ranks of farmers. Members units could then become those riders who owned horses or had them available. In the district of Liberec, one cavalry platoon of 28 men was formed for the needs of the Volkssturm based in the county capital, commanded by Johann Anderle.

Intelligence units also functioned during the militia, always one hundredth in each district, which was ideally commanded by an officer of the existing SA intelligence sturmů. Minimum technical education was also required for ordinary members who they recruited mostly from professions such as electrician, mechanic, telegraph operator, telephone operator or men trained in special courses. In the district of Liberec, one was established intelligence companies of 99 men led by Commander Alfred Urbank.

The largest special unit of Volkssturm in Liberec consisted of an engineering section, comprising three hundreds. Former members of the
engineers were to organize primarily here SA and Technische Nothilfe units, as well as masonry and construction masters, bricklayers, carpenters, joiners, locksmiths and other craftsmen. The functions of commanders were performed by Wilhelm Soukup, Franz Nick and Ernst Kaulfersch.

The last of these special units was the ambulance company in Liberec, associating doctors, pharmacists, druggists and former members of the German Red Cross so that everyone has battalion available to its own physician and each company at least a paramedic. For training
the ambulance units received all medical equipment from the SA and the German Red crosses.

After the formation of German militia units, the basic was approached training, which varied according to the expected classification. The commanders of the battalions and companies graduated nine days of training in the empire, while other lower commanders were waiting for
weekly courses in the military space in Milovice near Prague or local weekend trainings directly in Liberec barracks under the auspices of experienced Wehrmacht officers and NCOs. Training held approximately from November 1944 until the last days of the war in May 1945 and their
graduation was, despite the frequent displeasure of the participants, mandatory. Thus instructed commanders then they were to lead the basic training of ordinary men of the Volkssturm. It took place in form regular five-hour Sunday services always twice a month, minimum theoretical
the militiamen then had to acquire the knowledge during the evening classes on weekdays. Related with the approaching front, training was kept
to a minimum and focused on basic military skills, including shooting while lying unsupported, throwing a grenade in all positions
and instruction on the use of armored fists. In addition, the militia men had to acquire orientation in the field and its description, observation or reporting. They formed a specific form of training and educational films, mandatory for the Volkssturm.

The mentioned weekend courses in the Liberec barracks were always held for 120 men, with their representatives had to send every battalion
from the district of Liberec. Especially in the spring of 1945, however, it occurred quite often to fail to complete the course because the
participants did not arrive at all. An example is the training of mid-April 1945, for which up to half reported.

In order to supplement the Volkssturm courses mentioned, it is necessary to mention a few more special, namely the course for engineers at the Wehrmachtspionierschule in Roztoky near Prague, which took place in several shifts in the period January - March 1945 and training fighter commando tanks (Panzerjagdkommando) in mid-April 1945 in combat conditions today of the Polish city of Luban. Another of the groups that was
to get a worldview and combat training consisted of youth from the Hitler Youth and the BdM. They served this purpose so-called "gate-tightening" training camps on and off the county, built from at the beginning of 1945. The courses lasted four to six weeks and instructors were assigned to
lead from the ranks of officers or non-commissioned officers of the SS and the Wehrmacht, as well as senior leaders Hitler Youth.

For training and service purposes, the Volkssturm used the weapons and ammunition of SA units, taking care for maximum ammunition savings.
The material always had to be returned at the end of the service.

On the activities of their units then the commanders not only made regular reports, but by order of the imperial viceroy they had to lead to
At the level of battalions and companies, detailed diaries documenting the origin, activities and deployment Volkssturmu. If possible, these chronicles were to be supplemented with photographs, as they were county At the beginning of 1945, the leader wished that the materials would
be used after the war documents for recording historical events.

https://dspace.tul.cz/bitstream/handle/ ... sAllowed=y
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 30 Oct 2021 21:08

New finds

Volkssturm-Bataillon Großlöbichau​

Volkssturm-Einheit Langenorla

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... /&pageNo=1

Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 30 Oct 2021 21:54

MILITARY IMPROVISATIONS During the RUSSIAN CAMPAIGN

CMH Pub 104-1

Center of Military History United States Army Washington, D.C.

Chapter 16. Political Measures Introduced by the National Socialist Party

I. Civilian Labor Procurement

II. The Volkssturm

III. Paramilitary Units During the Last Stage of the War

Political Measures Introduced by the National Socialist Party

I. Civilian Labor Procurement

During the years preceding the outbreak of the war, civilian labor procurement had to be improvised on a large scale for the construction of fortifications. Even at the time when the West Wall was under construction, the allocation of manpower was essentially an improvisation of
gigantic proportions. Receiving unusually high pay and enjoying a variety of other benefits, hundreds of thousands of men were employed by the
Todt Organization and moved from one building project to the next. Not everything that was built at that time was beyond criticism, yet some
of the achievement of the years 1938-39 would not have been possible without these improvisations. Toward the end of the war another
improvised labor force was formed to construct additional fortifications in the west. This time it consisted of entire Hitler Youth units, of men
who were in age groups subject to labor conscription but too old for military service, and of men who were no longer fit for combat.

The improvisations introduced during that period had highly political aspects. They were directed by laymen some of whom had never seen
military service and whose technical knowledge was very limited. They were unaware of the major importance of materiel in military planning
and were inclined to confound a temporary surge of enthusiasm- much as undoubtedly existed among the Hitler Youth Combat Units- with real fighting ability. These Party functionaries were under the erroneous impression that their own fanaticism was shared by everybody and that this alone would make up for all the shortages and deficiencies which characterize all last-minute improvisations. On the other hand, there was little opportunity for preventive measures at a time when only painstaking efforts could conceal the existing chaos. The Volkssturm might perhaps have presented such an opportunity if only it had been drawn up as a levee en masse with long-range material preparations and if entirely different slogans had been used for the mental and spiritual conditioning of the people.

II. The Volkssturrn

The most extensive improvisation undertaken by the National Socialist Party was the mobilization of the Volkssturm during the last few months of the war. The idea was to call on the last forces of resistance the German people were capable of mustering. A misunderstood and misinterpreted tradition built on memories of 1813 may also have played its part in the minds of some Party officials.

The Volkssturm included all men up to the highest age groups as long as they were capable of bearing arms and were not already serving with the armed forces. This might have provided a broad basis for successfully mobilizing whatever fighting strength had not yet been tapped if there had
not been a complete lack of weapons, clothing, and equipment. Whereas clothing and equipment might conceivably be improvised, this does not hold true of arming hundreds of thousands or even millions of men. The Wehrmacht could spare nothing. At the same time it became more and
more obvious that the paramilitary Party formations had hoarded and hidden weapons and ammunition, but in view of the large number of Volkssturm draftees these weapons were of little help. Then, a Party official had the idea of manufacturing simplified Volkssturm rifles with
barrels he could "procure" from some factories in Saxony. This plan was also of little consequence. Thus the whole project of staging an armed
levee en masse was doomed from the very outset.

Leadership and training were two of the other problems to be solved. Among the men of the Volkssturm were many veterans of World War I. Although there had been many changes in the field of tactics, these men had sufficient military background to cope with the simple missions of which the Volkssturm was capable. To provide adequate training was a more difficult matter. Men who differed widely in age, former branch of service, or type of training, as well as men without any training whatsoever, were attending military drill periods in their spare time, as a rule on Sundays. Occasionally; in towns with local garrisons, one of two instructors were provided by regular army units. That was all the assistance the Wehrmacht could give because it had no men to spare. Moreover the Volkssturm was a Party improvisation and probably deliberately kept apart
from the Wehrmacht from its initial organization.

Only when actually committed in combat was the Volkssturm to be placed under the tactical control of the Wehrmacht and fight in conjunction
with the regular field forces. There was no reason for great expectations. The call to arms for an extended tour of duty was to be locally
restricted. The men were to be called upon only if the enemy threatened their home county and even then they were to be used exclusively
for local defense. Even that was almost too much to expect. When, toward the end of the war, entire Volkssturm battalions were committed far away from their homes on the Eastern Front, this emergency measure was contrary to the spirit and original mission of the Volkssturm and could
only lead to failure.

Guard duty and local security assignments were practically the only missions for which the Volkssturm was really qualified. Its composition, its limited training, and the fact that no more than rifles and in some cases only pistols and hand grenades could be issued as weapons, precluded its commitment in real combat operations. Since it was incapable of withstanding critical situations, the Volkssturm could only become a liability and threat to the troops it was to join in battle. Its proper mission was to construct and guard road blocks. Important psychological considerations
spoke against restricting Volkssturm units to purely local commitment. Surely the primary interest of the men resided in inflicting a minimum of
war damage to their home towns where their families lived. Thus, it was safe to assume that the Volkssturm men would prefer to avoid any last-ditch stand in the immediate vicinity of their home towns. The tactical commanders therefore took the precaution to suggest that road blocks
and fortifications should be erected at a sufficient distance from any community in order to spare it the effects of combat action. Later orders
from higher headquarters specified that no Volkssturm units should be committed any closer than thirty miles from their immediate home towns. This, however, meant a complete reversal of the basic principle of restricting the Volkssturm men to the defense of their immediate home territories.

In East Prussia the Volkssturm did a better job than anywhere else. It was there that the idea of the Volkssturm levy had originated since
East Prussia was the first German province directly threatened by the enemy. There the organization and training of the Volkssturm made the greatest progress.

East Prussia alone raised thirty-two Volkssturm battalions. All of these remained in that province even when, in November 1944, the civilian population from the northern districts had to be evacuated. After that, most of the Volkssturm units were used to prepare reserve battle positions
in the rear area for a possible withdrawal of the combat troops who in turn provided instruc­tors for the Volkssturm battalions. Months of
continuous instruction raised their standard of training to such a degree that a number of Volkssturm battalions were able to carry out limited combat missions. A few of these so-called special employment units were equipped with a sufficient number of modern weapons such as the
most recent 75-mm. antitank guns, the latest model machine guns, and some older-type small-caliber antiaircraft guns. Some of them even had adequate motor transportation. The units were composed of a small percentage of World War I veterans with the rest about equally divided
between 16- and 17-year old youngsters and elderly men from 60 to 75. Some of the battalions were under the command of former staff officers
who had distinguished themselves in World War I but were now afflicted with various physical disabilities. The majority of the battalions were
short of weapons, equipment, and training, and their employment in actual combat operations was out of the question. It was planned to
integrate them into the field forces only in case of a general withdrawal of the lines.

From the outset this was recognized as a serious handicap, which, however, could not be corrected since the Army had no jurisdiction over these formations. Time and again the Army requested that the battalions be immediately disbanded and all Volkssturm men fit for combat duty be transferred to the field forces. Yet every one of these requests was flatly rejected by the Party. Thus, during the latter part of January 1945 when the front began to give way, most of the Volkssturm battalions employed in East Prussia were of no use to the Army. Wherever they did not disintegrate altogether, they suffered heavy casualties. But contrary to standing orders, a few battalions had been moved up into combat
alongside seasoned field units during the preceding weeks and these battalions gave a good account of themselves. Special mention is due to Volkssturm Battalion Labiau, which fought as part of a division improvised from service troops. Three times the battalion was dislodged, but in
every instance it succeeded in recapturing its original position by launching counterattacks. In this bitter struggle the battalion commander and
most of his troops remained on the field of battle.

At another time the Volkssturm performed less well. Showing much zeal in military matters, Party headquarters in East Prussia produced its own
75-mm. antitank guns with iron-wheeled gun mounts and conducted short training courses to familiarize members of the Volkssturm organization with the weapon. By the end of January 1945 the situation near Tapiau east of Koenigsberg was obscure. (Map 4) There, the personnel of an Army ordnance school was engaged in bitter fighting against advancing enemy armor. The commanding officer of the ordnance school had been killed
and Tapiau had changed hands several times but was held by German troops at that moment. Rumor had it that enemy tanks had broken through
and were advancing on Koenigsberg. Thereupon Party headquarters improvised an antitank gun battalion with twenty new 75-mm. antitank guns from its training school and dispatched it to the area east of Koenigsberg to take up positions for the protection of that city. At sundown strong armored formations suddenly came into sight opposite the antitank gun position. This impressive spectacle caused such a state of terror among
the inexperienced gun crews that they left their guns and ran for cover in all directions. Their leader, a young first lieutenant, tried in vain to
stop them. Assisted by a few instructors he succeeded in getting some of the guns ready for action and was just about to open fire when he
realized to his surprise that he was facing German tanks. It was the 5th Panzer Division, which, after heavy tank fighting in the area east of
Tapiau, had succeeded in breaking through the enemy lines and was now assembling in this area in compliance with its orders. For once the
failure of an improvisation was of distinct advantage.

III. Paramilitary Units During the Last Stage of the War

Toward the very end of the war the Party organized certain tactical units which were to be committed in the field. Political considerations predominated and outweighed all others. For some time past, elements of the Reich Labor Service had served as antiaircraft units. Since there
were absolutely no other forces available, elements of labor service battalions were employed to defend the road blocks they had previously constructed.

Hitler Youth Combat Units, organized during the last weeks of the war, were assigned to the field forces on various sectors of the front. Their
special task was the pursuit and destruction of enemy tanks with the help of bazookas and Panzerfausts. Just before the end of the war, Party Secretary Bormann attempted to organize an Adolf Hitler Volunteer Corps.

The accomplishments of these various paramilitary units are unknown to the authors.

https://history.army.mil/books/wwii/mil ... m.htm#cont

Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 31 Oct 2021 00:58

Update

Raus aus Königsberg!: wie 420 ostpreussische Jungen 1945 - Karl Springenschmid

Volkssturm-Bataillon 25/141 Lützow // Volkssturm-Bataillon Lützow

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Nv ... AF6BAgYEAI

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Vf ... F6BQjCAhAD

Volksturm-Bataillon 23/301 // Volksturm-Bataillon Hindenburg [Oberschlesien]

viewtopic.php?t=77836

http://ww2f.com/threads/ernst-tiburzy-s ... ient.6518/

Volkssturm-Baubataillon badisches I (Konstanz)
Volkssturm-Baubataillon badisches II (Neustadt)
Volkssturm-Baubataillon badisches III (Villingen)

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... &pageNo=21

Volkssturm-Bataillon München 16 (I. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon XVI

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... post743110

Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 31 Oct 2021 21:54

Einsatz-Bataillonen = Mobile "Action Battallions" of the Volkssturm

Stand-Bataillonen = local battallions of the Volkssturm

The organization and purpose of 'Sprengkommandos' see SS-Partei Kanzlei-Wehrmacht, erwendung des Deutschen Volkssturms", 28 March
1945, p. 2, NS 6/99, BA; 21 AG "Cl News Sheet" #27, 14 Aug. 1945, Part III, p. 8, WO 205/997, PRO; and Rose, pp. 227-228.

"Sprengkommando" agents also had orders — in some cases — to operate after enemy occupation if their targets were not properly destroyed. Allied Intelligence suspected that such an agent was responsible for an arson attack upon the main building of the Siempelkamp Machine Works
in Krefeld, which produced armour plating for tanks, as well as other vital military material. The main suspect was an executive at the plant who
was thought to be an "undercover Nazi labour spy," and who was subsequently evacuated as a security threat, although he was never formally convicted.

History of the Counter Intelligence Corps. Vol. XIX, pp. 83-84.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New addition to an older post.

Volkssturm-Einsatz-Bataillon Lyck I
Volkssturm-Einsatz-Bataillon Lyck II

Volkssturm-Stand-Bataillon Lyck I
Volkssturm-Stand-Bataillon Lyck II

Volkssturm-Stand-Kompanie Grajewo

Volkssturm-Transport-Kompanie Lyck [mot]

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=192705&start=1260

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 31 Oct 2021 22:14

NARA T313 R324 Pz.AOK.3

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:45

T-313 R-326 Pz-AOK 3 November-Dezember 1944

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:47

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:49

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:51

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:53

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Germanicus
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Location: Shell Cove NSW Australia

Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 06:54

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 01 Nov 2021 08:16

RW 4/11WFSt/Op/Qu. 2 (I): Dienstanweisung für den Inspekteur der Tiroler Standschützen.- Fernschreiben an OB Südwest und General der Gebirgstruppen Feuerstein vom 11. Apr. 1945 (Entwurf)11. Apr. 1945

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 02 Nov 2021 00:15

New Finds

Volkssturm-Bataillon Menden

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... on-menden/

Volkssturm-Bataillon Schramm

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... n-schramm/

Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/52 // Volkssturm-Bataillon 52

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... aillon-52/

Volkssturm-Bataillon Witzenhausen I
Volkssturm-Bataillon Witzenhausen II

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... /&pageNo=9

Volkssturm Bataillon Krügel

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... &pageNo=19

Volkssturm Bataillon Eppingen IV
Volkssturm Bataillon Hirschhorn
Volkssturm Bataillon Reichenbach

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... /&pageNo=6

Volkssturm-Bataillon Rheinfelden

https://www.gedenkstaetten-suedlicher-o ... 2020-3.pdf

Volkssturm-Bataillon Zabern [Gau Baden-Elsaß]

RH 59/17 Bataillons- und Kompanieführer für die Volksstürme des Kreises Zabern (Liste) 13. Okt. 1944

https://invenio.bundesarchiv.de/invenio/main.xhtml
Last edited by Germanicus on 02 Nov 2021 07:42, edited 5 times in total.

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