An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 04:41

New Find

Volkssturm-Bataillon 12/5
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https://kriegsenden.nsdok.de/01.html

When the Cologne Volkssturm was sworn in on November 12th, the German observer ran again to propagandistic top form and swore "hard endurance" and "unbroken faith" in the "final victory". NSDAP district leader Schaller said full-bodied that “the spirit that penetrated the Volkssturm” would ultimately “win the victory over the enemy material superiority”.

The reality was in diametrical opposition to such empty phrases. The mostly older men who were called up for the Volkssturm looked more like bizarre characters who, in their mostly improvised clothing, appeared completely overwhelmed and disoriented. In mid-November, for example, a chronicler observed a Volkssturm squad that was busy erecting anti-tank barriers, as ordered. Wehrmacht soldiers flowing back, he stated, would "laugh each other out" at such defensive attempts.

"On the afternoon of March 4th it was said: 'The districts will be disbanded immediately, the district leaders will gather their strength at 6 p.m. in the Schnurgasse bunker'. The next day begins with equipping the [Volkssturm] companies. In their mid-50s, still with the young men and they seem to be physically unfit, psychologically worn down in long nights of bombing, almost apathetic. When we take a closer look at the rifles, we see faulty prey weapons from the first years of the war, which German ammunition does not fit something for men who are unfamiliar with weapons. Nobody can handle hand grenades or bazookas. Why all this? To this someone says: 'Now I also know what miracle weapons are, so that we should be surprised what we can do with this stuff!' the 'troops are standing are armed, so they can be thrown at the enemy. So yesterday's police officers have become a throwing unit. "

The inner Cologne green belt with the suburbs from Braunsfeld to Longerich including the city forest was traversed by a trench system in the spring of 1945 that had been dug for months by young people and old men in the entrenchment service. This ring was now supposed to be defended by the ragged and completely inadequately armed Volkssturm, which was reinforced by outdated police and fire brigade troops. While the latter were withdrawn shortly thereafter as part of the evacuation to the right bank of the Rhine, numerous Volkssturm men who were sent to meet the US troops evaded their senseless defense mission, whereby most of the associations eventually disbanded by themselves. When the German combat commandant inspected the Volkssturm positions on March 5, he found it unoccupied.
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 05:11

New Finds Gorlitz

Volkssturm-Bataillon 21/81

Volkssturm-Bataillon Dr. Bokamper
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 05:39

24 Reichsgau Ost-Hannover:

The Volkssturm in the Celle area
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Referred to as “the last contingent” or an army of “children and old men”, the Volkssturm represented a desperate attempt to postpone the end of the war. Archival documents, chronicles and eyewitness testimony in the Celle area partly report on the military intervention of this quickly evacuated troop. What is known about the origins, organization and use of the Volkssturm? A chronological evaluation of the demanding source situation.

The emergence of the Volkssturm was preceded by a phase of military defeat. The invasion of Western Allied forces on June 6, 1944 in Normandy, the costly battles against the Red Army in Ukraine and Romania, the encirclement of Army Group North in Courland and finally the retreat of the German troops to East Prussia in October 1944 marked the progressive decline of the Third Reich. In view of the considerable losses in soldiers and military equipment, the use of the entire society's resources for the "total war effort", which Adolf Hitler finally announced by decree of July 25, 1944, increased. [1] Using political instruments, the fascist regime implemented drastic measures in the following weeks to free up forces for the armed forces and the armaments industry. [2]

Already in the previous months, as part of so-called "combing-out actions", hundreds of thousands of UK conscripts [3] had already been lifted, and companies less important to the war effort were shut down in order to employ their employees in the key industries for the armaments industry. The decree of July 25 created extensive decision-making powers, especially for Reich Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels. One day before the decree was published, the headline “The people demand the most total war” appeared in all newspapers in the East Hanover region. [4] In state institutions in particular, human resources have now been released and the orientation of economic capacities has been focused on the war effort.

The “Leader's Decree on the Formation of the German Volkssturm” [5] , dated September 25, 1944, was not submitted until the following day due to discussions that lasted into the night in the East Prussian Fuehrer's headquarters “Wolfsschanze” - but the decree was issued signed immediately by Adolf Hitler. [6] October 18, 1944, was chosen as the date of the announcement - it was the 131st anniversary of the Battle of Leipzig.

The Reichsführer SS, Heinrich Himmler, took the first roll call from Volkssturm units in Königsberg (East Prussia) on October 18. In his speech, Himmler glorified the “courageous struggle of all German freedom fighters” in the Leipzig Battle of Nations into a victory for underserved, poorly equipped and poorly armed troops over a superior enemy. In order to give the Volkssturm a certain historical legitimacy, the Reichsführer SS accepted that the comparison with the Battle of the Nations was at the same time limping at several feet. Although critical opinions were also reflected in historical mood reports in the earliest phase of the Volkssturm, the recording and formation of the troops progressed relatively quickly in the weeks after the proclamation.
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On November 2, 1944, the district leadership of the NSDAP in Celle sent letters of confirmation to the battalion leaders in the respective localities. [7] A total of fourteen battalions comprised the Celle district. [8] A battalion consisted of four companies (some five), a company of three to four platoons, a platoon of 3 to four groups and a group of 10 Volkssturm soldiers. [9] Later so-called alarm companies were added. If all forces had been drawn on, almost 10,000 Volkssturmmen would have been available in the Celle district.

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The leadership of the Volkssturm lay with the Gauleitung and the district leadership of the NSDAP. From their "reliable and steadfast Nazis select" were, of which "a complete fulfillment of their leadership roles in the German Volkssturm expected" could. " [10] was as Rouding leader of the SA-Hauptsturmführer Kohnert and as a clerk for training and special tasks of the SA-Hauptsturmführer Thies ordered. [11] Its tasks included, among other things, the regular inspection of the service at the units in the Celler district. [12]

The organization's hierarchies were flat. Volkssturm soldiers were accordingly prohibited from addressing concerns directly to the district management. [13] Even without specifically ordered disciplinary measures from higher management levels, the respective battalion leaders were also given a generous amount of leeway for sanctions. [14]

In early November, it was first to the solemn swearing troops - this was on November 12, 1944 "will take place, if possible at 10.00." [15] The places were by the battalion commander - to determine autonomously in agreement with the respective local branch line. The day before, November 11, 1944, another preparatory event for the battalion and company commanders took place at the Gauleiter in Lüneburg - the journey to this was done jointly by bus. [16]

The swearing-in of the Volkssturm battalions took place according to plan - for example, the swearing-in ceremony was held in Unterlüß at 10:00 a.m. on November 12, 1944 at the Hohenrieth sports field. The Volkssturm was sworn in under the oak trees in Beedenbostel - a wreath was laid at the memorial beforehand. [17]
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The first official Volkssturm order 1/44 was issued just one day after the swearing-in to the Volkssturm people in the Celler district. [18] It regulates the management, the registration, the structure, the structure and the clothing. In its structure, the Volkssturm was made up of four so-called “Aufgeboten”, which included all those born in the military between 1884 and 1928. The youngest Volkssturm men were therefore 16 and the oldest 60 years old when they were recorded.

All Volkssturm soldiers had to procure their clothing and equipment independently, regardless of their rank. [19] All uniforms as well as weatherproof sports and work clothing were permitted as clothing. The necessary equipment included a backpack, blanket, cookware, haversack, canteen, drinking cup and cutlery. Where the necessary items of equipment could not be obtained from their own stocks, they should be organized through neighborhood assistance.
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The second official Volkssturm order 2/44 was also issued on November 13, 1944 and contained instructions for preliminary training. This should focus on ensuring combat operations. [20] A "thorough" shooting training, an infantry training and anti-tank should come to the fore - whereas the formal service and military exercises to an essential minimum should be limited. [21] According to Volkssturmbefehl 2/44, a whole series of basic service regulations were provided for field and combat training - according to the order letter, however, these regulations and books were not available at the time. [22]

From November 24th to 30th, 1944, a training course for the battalion commanders of the Celle, Burgdorf, Gifhorn and Fallingbostel districts was held by the teaching force of the armored troop school in the Fallingbostel camp. [23] Meanwhile the management level received their instruction in the military tools of the trade, the medical examinations for their suitability took place for the Volkssturm soldiers, whereby the Volkssturm doctors had to “apply strict standards” during the examinations. [24] UK positions [25] , as they existed with the Wehrmacht associations, did not exist in the Volkssturm. The possibilities to oppose the draft notice were limited.

Sections of the population were evidently not very enthusiastic about this fact, as evidenced, for example, in a mood report by the former mayor Schulze from Winsen (Aller) on November 22, 1944. [26] In his situation report to the district president, however, the Celle district administrator stated: “The appeal of the Volkssturm has been received very sympathetically in the country on the whole. There is also a general understanding of the need for excavation work. It would only be desirable here that the selection is carried out more carefully in operations such as the one that is now running in the left Rhine area. In many cases between the ages of 60 and 65, people working on the land are already exhausted in hard work and have become clumsy in their ability to adapt to foreign conditions. (...) ". [27]

The Volkssturm orders and general circulars issued in the second half of November 1944 essentially contained measures for the further organization and training of the troops. In particular, it concerned instructions on so-called follow-up records and on which groups of people should be convened in detail for the Volkssturm. Flak helpers, for example, were excluded from the Volkssturm. [28] On the other hand, workers and employees of the witness offices, ammunition factories and all repair facilities were basically part of the Volkssturm. [29]

While the management level tried to increase the personnel strength of the Volkssturm through follow-up records, the battalions already set up in the Celle district had completely different problems - they lacked the necessary training equipment. In December 1944, in many places there was a shortage of firearms that would have been necessary for training purposes. In Unterlüß, an entire battalion temporarily had only eight small-bore rifles, which had been made available by the local SA. [30]

Since there was no ammunition available for the rifles, the battalion leader, Lieutenant Colonel Paul Guse, asked the NSDAP district leadership to provide him with 100,000 rounds of ammunition so that training could begin immediately. [31] As a former commander of the air ammunition plant 4 / XI Höfer [32] and in the exercise of his work as an operator in Unterlüß, Lieutenant Colonel Guse had to know that such an order could hardly be served due to the material shortage prevailing at the time. Possibly this knowledge also prompted him to order the required cartridges himself without further ado. [33] Later, in his capacity as battalion leader, Guse also ordered hand grenades from the Rinker company in Menden - when these were not delivered, he asked the NSDAP district leadership in Celle to allocate 120 live hand grenades. [34]
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 05:45

The Volkssturm in the Celle area Part 2
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The shortages in armament can also be derived from the Volkssturm order 16/45 of January 15, 1945. According to the order, the battalions of the Celle district were to report the number and type of weapons that were available to the German Volkssturm by January 20, 1945. [35] Weapons that had been made available by the Volkssturm soldiers themselves or by private individuals were to be listed here.

The inadequate supply of weapons and ammunition was documented in writing several times in the first weeks of 1945. In the Volkssturm order 17/45 it says: “Some battalions have meanwhile been allocated a modest amount of live infantry ammunition. The inquiries coming here for further ammunition procurement are pointless. All steps taken in this regard to procure ammunition directly for the district have failed. The Volkssturm is therefore dependent on the allocations regularly promised by the Gau and will continue to distribute the ammunition after receipt. " [36]

Despite the lack of weapons and ammunition, the battalion leaders were instructed that their service in the Volkssturm was properly carried out and that the soldiers “did not get bored during their service time”. [37]

The 2nd battalion of the Celler Volkssturm apparently belonged to those battalions to which live infantry ammunition had been allocated "in a modest amount". A letter from the Celle district administrator to SA Hauptsturmführer Thies dated December 14, 1944 proves that the Nienhagen-based 2nd Battalion should fire live ammunition between 8:00 and 12:00 using carbines for December 17, 1944 Model 98, in the shooting direction Langlingen - Groß Eicklingen or Fernhavekost - Wiedenrode was approved. [38]
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From February 4 to 11, 1945, an eight-day course for the Unterführer took place in the Celler Heidekaserne. [39] For this purpose, four sub-commanders, ie platoon or group leaders, were assigned from each company. From February 24th to March 3rd, courses for leaders and subordinates of the Volkssturm in the Celle district took place in Celle and Westercelle. [40] From March 11th to March 17th, a course for subordinates followed in Bergen. In addition to the practical training, theoretical training was also increasingly carried out. Thematically, these training courses were lined up with National Socialist propaganda and tried to give the struggle of the Volksturm a historical and ideological legitimation. For example, at the beginning of February 1945, letters were sent from the district leadership of the Celle NSDAP, which had "Bolshevism" as their theme and which called it a "war of world views" to combat it. [41] In essence, however, these propaganda training courses were strongly anti-Semitic. [42]

In mid-February 1945, battalion doctors were assigned to each of the Volkssturm battalions. [43] The fourteen Volkssturm battalions in Celle were also supplemented at the beginning of 1945 by alarm companies zbV [44] . With Volkssturmbefehl 23/45 two more alarm companies were set up in Unterlüß and Belsen in the district area “for any immediate deployment”. [45] These should be supplied with weapons and equipment as quickly as possible. However, at the time of installation, they already showed glaring defects.

With the help of the party organization of the NSDAP, each Volkssturmführer had to procure all usable weapons and ammunition for the alarm units in their area of ​​responsibility. [46] This also included the existing hunting weapons. For this purpose, Volkssturmbefehl 23/45 stipulated: “Where hunters should not be moved, even under instruction about the patriotic obligation to surrender their weapons, the confiscation will be obtained by the mayor or district administrator. Such cases are to be reported immediately in order to obtain the seizure order.
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From the beginning of February 1945 soldiers of the Celler Volkssturmbataillones were deployed to relieve state riflemen as guards for work details of prisoners of war. Their main tasks were to check the prisoners of war - especially at the beginning and end of work and several times during the night. [47] The replacements were intended to free up additional capacities for the fighting troops.
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It is striking how bureaucratic the establishment of the Volkssturm was. Despite the advanced course of the war, numerous general instructions and statements were issued on issues relating to the salary of the Volkssturm soldiers (1 RM per day), welfare and care in cases of illness - including the artistic design of the local group flags.

Less than a month before the arrival of the Allies, a previous order for the Volkssturm in the Celler district, which initially provided for the use of anti-tank barriers, was withdrawn at short notice. [48] This apparently happened on the instructions of the Wehrmacht services and revealed a problem that was increasingly reflected in the correspondence in the following days. The Volkssturm order 31/45, issued in mid-March 1945, shows that the responsibilities and tasks within the Volkssturm were gradually overtaken by military reality. According to the order of March 17, 1945, the "possible uses of the Volkssturm" were redefined - three and a half weeks before the end of the war. [49]

On the instructions of the head of the party chancellery, Martin Bormann, a written clarification was issued that the Volkssturm should only be used in "greatest danger for the home area" - the guarding of prisoners of war, on the other hand, should be omitted, according to the order. With a view to the possible "combat deployment of the Volkssturm by Wehrmacht services", the order stated that, according to an agreement between Martin Bormann and the Reichsführer SS, Heinrich Himmler, only the Gauleiter had to decide on the combat deployment. [50] Certainly it was not so much a question of the most efficient military defense possible - for Bormann and Himmler, the focus was more on securing personal power. Against this background, the Wehrmacht should only use Volkssturm soldiers in the event of prior coordination.

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 05:49

The Volkssturm in the Celle area Part 3
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Despite the disagreements between the Wehrmacht leadership, the SS leadership and the party chancellery, there were agreements between the Volkssturm and the Wehrmacht leadership in the Celle district. On March 29, 1945 - less than two weeks before the end of the war - the battalion leader Guse from Unterlüß reported on the exploration and preparation of anti-tank traps. [51]

Accordingly, possible locations were explored around Unterlüß - in coordination with the armed forces site elder in Celle, Major General Tzschöckell, the Rheinmetall-Borsig AG plant was designated as the "core plant" in the defense of the site. [52] In addition, barriers should be created by felling trees near the road, and a defensive nest with tensile strength should be set up at Lutterloh. The selected positions were to be manned as group nests and equipped with bazookas as required.
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It was the images of National Socialist propaganda that ensured that the Allies initially classified the Volkssturm as a serious threat. In internal handouts of the US troops, the Volkssturm was rated as extremely dangerous - "People who defend their homeland under such conditions are able to build up a very targeted defense (...)", says the US Intelligence Bulletin of February 1945 . [53] lacked at this time the US forces nor the depth of experience with this potential threat.

The possible danger of a defensive Volkssturm was soon overtaken by the military reality. What actually happened when the US troops or the British armed forces arrived has not been recorded in any official correspondence. Frequently, the reports of contemporary witnesses are therefore the only available sources that still report on the actual deployment of the Volkssturm units.

After the end of the war, the village school teacher Alfred Schlueter reported from Adelheiddorf that there had been a call for the Volkssturm - but most of them did not go because they thought they could use their houses and farms better. [54] Schlüter stated: “The bridges should be blown up. But the Volkssturm didn't do it. "

The Volkssturm was also to be used in Wathlingen. Rector Schröder and teacher Seffer talked about this in a conversation with Hanna Fueß after the end of the war as follows: “He (note: the Volkssturm) was supposed to defend the village and blow up the Fuhsebrücke on the railway bridge. At first the Volkssturm had to guard the bridges, but it happened that they said to the Volkssturmführer: "Put them there, then the bridge will definitely not go up!" The last few days the Wehrmacht took over the bridge watch. ” [55] The bridges at Wathlingen were finally blown up by the Wehrmacht. Seffer himself was platoon leader of the Volkssturm in Wathlingen [56] and was taken along for interrogation after the arrival of the US troops.

After the end of the war, the rumor lingered in Eicklingen that the Volkssturm had even actively prevented bridges from being blown. [57]

In Bröckel, Pastor Gellermann told Hanna Fueß about the occurrence of the Volkssturm as follows: “A few days beforehand, we built anti-tank barriers in Bröckel through the Volkssturm. They were erected outside the village but were only half finished. We then just went home. " [58]

Teacher Müller from Lachendorf stated in his diary: “3. April: We often have bridge watch from the Volkssturm. Often we don't know what to do. We must tell soldiers and civilians whether they are not deserters. And then the Volkssturm men work on all three bridges and prepare them to be blown up. (...). APRIL 9: At night, we stand guard at the bridges and must if command comes from Celle, (...), blow up the bridges. " [59] The Blue Bridge [60] in the language was finally on April 12, 1945 still blown up by the Wehrmacht [61] - but only one of the installed aerial bombs exploded, so that only half of the bridge was damaged and it was still passable on the other side. [62]

The Celler Volkssturm was responsible for the town of Lachtehausen. As the Lachtehaus Müller Walther Fricke remembered in a conversation with Hanna Fueß after the end of the war, the Volkssturm there had “its arsenal in the metal goods factory”. [63] This was Metallwaren Altona-Celle AG, which at that time had its company headquarters at 98 Wittinger Strasse. A couple of nights "before the enemy came", the Volkssturm sank its weapons in the Aller, Fricke recalled after the end of the war. [64]

In many places there are no indications whatsoever in contemporary witness reports that prove a military presence of the Volkssturm. Serious intervention could probably neither be expected nor carried out. The units of the Celler Volkssturm were poorly trained or not trained at all, their armament was inadequate for combat operations and in some cases they only had makeshift equipment and incomplete uniforms - yes, even the uniform Volkssturm armbands were not available for four months after the establishment. [65]

There were probably different reasons for the fact that the Volkssturm in the Celle area was no longer used as originally planned. One of the main reasons for this was the shift in power between the Wehrmacht leadership, the SS and the party chancellery. The friction ultimately led to the fact that the tasks and responsibilities could not be organized efficiently until the end, despite the excessive bureaucracy.

In the Celle area there was also the fact that the Volkssturm soldiers were not used directly for national defense in the vast majority of cases. They were regularly tasked with guarding prisoners of war, serving as bridge guards and demolition squads, or doing entrenchment work. From a theoretical point of view, the Volkssturm was armed - but from a practical point of view, this armament was only suitable to a limited extent for use in war. The use of hunting rifles against semi and fully automatic weapons of the approaching Allied troops illustrates this.

The planned uses of the Volkssturm did not come to fruition either. In most cases, bridges were not blown by the Volkssturm itself, but by soldiers of the Wehrmacht. Many of the locally based Volkssturm soldiers probably had no personal interest in destroying bridges that they had to use again after the end of the war with carts and carts.

In addition, the Wehrmacht wanted to keep the bridges open as long as possible so that they could be used for their own retreat. If the convoys and troops of the Wehrmacht had moved on, however, the Volkssturm literally remained in a lost position, as the memories of the electrician Heinrich Höltershinken from Wietze confirm: “The closer the English came, the quieter it became on the road. We said to ourselves: “Our soldiers are going back, and now the Volkssturm should make it! That is an impossibility! " [66]

The recklessness of the fascist system was confirmed in the Volkssturm. Anyone who did not want to participate was against it and was declared a system enemy. Cases have also been documented in the Celle area that show that the NSDAP's district leadership acted with all its might against so-called "slackers". For power interests, the party and Reich leadership did not shy away from sending children and old people into a hopeless struggle. In view of the hopeless situation, however, a similar picture emerged in many places in the Celle area. Instead of sacrificing "down to the last cartridge case", the Volkssturm units stretched out their weapons at the last minute. So far, no case has been documented according to which it could be attributed to the Volkssturm that the advance of the Allied troops in the Celle area was delayed.


H. Altmann


[1] Decree of the Führer on the total war mission of July 25, 1944, RGBl Part I, No. 34, issued on July 27, 1944.

[2] Mammach, Der Volkssturm - The last contingent 1944/45, p. 13.

[3] UK position, ie "indispensable" and thus not used for war operations until then.

[4] Mammach, Der Volkssturm - The last contingent 1944/45, p. 15.

[5] Decree of the Führer on the formation of the German Volkssturm of September 25, 1944, RGBl Part I, No. 53, issued on October 20, 1944.

[6] Mammach, Der Volkssturm - The last contingent 1944/45, p. 33.

[7] Letter from the district leadership of the NSDAP in Celle to the battalion leader of the Volkssturm, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 180.

[8] Compilation of the battalions and companies in the German Volkssturm, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 174.

[9] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 167.

[10] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 165.

[11] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 165.

[12] Volkssturm order No. 27/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 165.

[13] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 168.

[14] Volkssturm order No. 4/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 159.

[15] Letter from the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle to the battalions I to IX from November 7th, 1944, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 179.

[16] Letter from the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle dated November 8, 1944, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 178.

[17] School chronicle Beedenbostel, KrA Celle.

[18] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 165.

[19] Volkssturm order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 168.

[20] Volkssturm order No. 2/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 162.

[21] Volkssturm order No. 2/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 162.

[22] Volkssturm order No. 2/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 163.

[23] Letter from the district leader dated November 14, 1944, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 159.

[24] Volkssturm order No. 5/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 157.

[25] See footnote 3.

[26] Report of the Mayor of Winsen / A of November 22, 1944, KRA Celle Document 420, No. 8c / 2 in: Wegener, The population has fullest confidence in the Führer ..., p. 481.

[27] Situation report of November 26, 1944, KRA Celle Document 425, No. 8c / 2; in: Wegener, The population has complete confidence in the Führer ..., p. 481.

[28] Letter from OKW, No. 6494/44 ofNovember23, 1944; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 163.

[29] Letter from the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle dated December 14, 1944; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 145.

[30] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle, dated December 19, 1944; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 145.

[31] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the NSDAP district leadership in Celle, dated December 19, 1944; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 145.

[32] Altmann, Die Luftmunitionsanstalt 4 / XI and the Löwe underground relocation, p. 20 f.

[33] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle, dated January 17, 1945; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 122.

[34] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the NSDAP district leadership in Celle, dated February 19, 1945; Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 61.

[35] Volkssturm order No. 16/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 119.

[36] Volkssturm order No. 17/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[37] Volkssturm order No. 17/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[38] Letter from the district administrator to SA Hauptsturmführer Thies dated December 14, 1944, Altmann archive.

[39] Volkssturm order No. 20/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[40] Volkssturm order No. 29/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 36.

[41] Letter from the district leadership of the Celle NSDAP dated February 8, 1945, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 66.

[42] Letter from the district leadership of the Celle NSDAP dated February 14, 1945, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 66.

[43] Volkssturm personnel order No. 7/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[44] ZbV, ie “for special disposal”.

[45] Volkssturm order No. 23/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[46] Volkssturm order No. 23/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[47] Letter from the district leadership of the Celle NSDAP dated February 8, 1945, Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 80.

[48] Volkssturm order No. 29/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 115.

[49] Volkssturm order No. 31/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 23.

[50] Volkssturm order No. 31/45, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 23.

[51] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle, dated March 29, 1945; Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 2.

[52] Letter from Colonel Guse, battalion leader of the VIII Volkssturm Battalion Unterlüß to the district leadership of the NSDAP Celle, datedMarch29, 1945; Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 2.

[53] US Intelligence Bulletin Vol. III, No. 6, February 1945, p. 36.

[54] Statement from teacher Alfred Schlueter in conversation with Hanna Fueß on April 22nd, 1947, KrA Celle.

[55] Statement by Rector Schröder and teacher Seffer in conversation with Hanna Fueß on November 4th, 1947, KrA Celle.

[56] Volkssturm personnel order No. 1/44, Hann. 31 I No. 326, p. 172.

[57] Statement from master baker August Wiedenroth in conversation with Hanna Fueß on January 28, 1947, KrA Celle.

[58] Statement from Pastor Gellermann, Bröckel, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on October 25, 1946, KrA Celle.

[59] Diary teacher Müller, Lachendorf, KrA Celle.

[60] At that time, the “Blue Bridge” was still called the “Green Bridge”. The paint only changed in the post-war period.

[61] Statement by Walther Fricke, Müller in Lachtehausen, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on May 20, 1947, KrA Celle.

[62] Statement from teacher Kruse, Gockenholz, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on September 11, 1946, KrA Celle.

[63] Statement by Walther Fricke, Müller in Lachtehausen, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on May 20, 1947, KrA Celle.

[64] Statement by Walther Fricke, Müller in Lachtehausen, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on May 20, 1947, KrA Celle.

[65] Letter from the district leadership of the Celle NSDAP dated February 8, 1945, Hann. 31 I No. 326, sheet 80.

[66] Statement from Heinrich Höltershinken, master electrician from Wietze, in conversation with Hanna Fueß on November 28, 1946, KrA Celle.

https://found-places.blogspot.com/2020/ ... celle.html
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 06:38

Bataillons- und Kompanieführer für die Volksstürme des Kreises Zabern (Liste)

RH 59 Verbände und Einheiten des Volkssturms (Gliederung)
Gau Baden-Elsaß (Gliederung)
Kreis Zabern (Gliederung)

Bundesarchiv, BArch RH 59/17

Alt-/Vorsignatur:
Zg. 223/90
aus RH 59/5

Kontext:

Verbände und Einheiten des Volkssturms >> RH 59 Verbände und Einheiten des Volkssturms >> Gau Baden-Elsaß >> Kreis Zabern
Laufzeit:
13. Okt. 1944

Alexander, Wilhelm
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Hauptmann der Reserve Geburtsdatum: 13.6.1897, Ort: Saarbuckenheim

Barth, Heinz
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Oberleutnant Geburtsdatum: 20.6.1915, Ort: Mannheim

Dummer, Otto
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Oberleutnant der Reserve Geburtsdatum: 27.6.1887, Ort: Kolberg

Düssort, Ludwig
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Feldwebel Geburtsdatum: 11.2.1890, Ort: Saargemünd

Heckel, Otto
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Vizefeldwebel Geburtsdatum: 24.4.1889, Ort: Forbach

Loew, Georg
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Oberbootsmannsmaat Geburtsdatum: 12.2.1888, Ort: Oberbronn

Schmidtner, Anton
Amtsbezeichnung/Dienstgrad: Oberfeldwebel Geburtsdatum: 20.3.1899, Ort: München

BArch RH 59 Verbände und Einheiten des Volkssturms

https://www.archivportal-d.de/item/I6V5 ... ZJ6A7FUTPB
Last edited by Germanicus on 26 Sep 2021 22:56, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 06:46

Volkssturm in Elsaß

The Volkssturm is established in Alsace on October 22, 1944 by decree of the Gauleiter who launched the same day an appeal to the population.
Due to lack of weapons and time, the Volkssturm will not be never really set up. The only public appearance of the three battalions that we were
able to assemble took place on November 11, 1944, during the swearing-in ceremony at the Führer (Vereidigung), in Strasbourg, Colmar and
Mulhouse. These battalions will never be engaged. Twelve days later, Leclerc enters Strasbourg, honoring the oath of Koufra.

https://archives.bas-rhin.fr/media/1281 ... uewwii.pdf

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 10:14

An amazing discovery and a most interesting topic to say the least.. A dramatic historical puzzle if correct.

The [Volkssturm-Bataillon] is added by myself in front of the Gau/Bataillon Number.

Volkssturm Kreis Sankt Ingbert

By Wolfgang Grote

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... &pageNo=17

Organisation des Volkssturms im Kreis Sankt Ingbert:

Aus einem von den Amerikanern erbeuteten Dokument ergeben sich die folgenden Einzelheiten:

1) Am 05.12.1944 existierten die folgenden Volkssturm-Bataillone im Kreis Sankt Ingbert:

- Aufgebot I: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/409

- Aufgebot II: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/408, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/410, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/412, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/414 &
[Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/416

- Aufgebot III: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/411, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/413 & [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/415

2) Nach der Reorganisation des Volkssturm im Reichsgau Westmark existierten am 20.01.1945 die folgenden Volkssturm-Bataillone im Kreis Sankt Ingbert:

- Aufgebot I: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/27; das Bataillon rekrutierte sich aus den Einwohnern der Stadt Sankt Ingbert.

- Aufgebot II: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/408, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/410, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/412, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/414 &
[Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/416; das [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/408 rekrutierte sich aus den Einwohnern der Vororte von Sankt Ingbert, während sich
die übrigen Bataillone aus den Einwohnern der Nachbargemeinden zusammensetzten.

- Aufgebot III: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/411, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/413 & [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/415; das [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/411
rekrutierte sich aus den Einwohnern der Vororte von Sankt Ingbert, das [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/413 rekrutierte sich aus den Einwohnern von Oberwürzbach, während sich die übrigen Bataillone aus den Einwohnern der Nachbargemeinden zusammensetzten. Die Zusammensetzung der Bataillon lag zwischen 3 und 5 Kompanien.

3) Am 20.02.1945 wurden die Bataillone in 2 Kategorien eingeteilt:

- Das [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/27 galt als ein mobiles Bataillon, von denen noch 2 weitere Bataillone aufgestellt werden sollten (vermutlich darunter auch das [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/70).

- Die übrigen Bataillone galten als statische Bataillone.

Quelle:

G2 Periodic Report XV US Corps Nr. 219 vom 21.03.1945
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[Translation]

Organization of the Volkssturm in the district of Sankt Ingbert:

From a document captured by the Americans, the following details emerge:

1) On 05.12.1944 the following Volkssturm-Bataillones existed in the district of Sankt Ingbert:

- Squad I: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/409

- Squad II: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/408,[ Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/410, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/412, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/414 &
Volkssturm-Bataillon27/416

- Squad III: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/411, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/413 & [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/415

2) After the reorganization of the Volkssturm in the Reichsgau Westmark, the following Volkssturm-Bataillones existed in the district of
Sankt Ingbert on 20.01.1945:

- Squad I: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/27; the battalion was recruited from the inhabitants of the town of Sankt Ingbert.

- Squad II: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/408, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/410, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/412, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/414 &
[Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/416; [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/408 was recruited from the inhabitants of the suburbs of Sankt Ingbert, while
the remaining battalions were composed of the inhabitants of the neighbouring communities.

- Contingent III: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/411, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/413 & [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/415; [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/411
was recruited from the inhabitants of the suburbs of Sankt Ingbert, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/413 was recruited from the inhabitants of Oberwürzbach, while the remaining battalions were composed of the inhabitants of the neighbouring communities. The composition of the
battalion was between 3 and 5 companies.

3) On 20.02.1945 the battalions were divided into 2 categories:

- The [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/27 was considered a mobile battalion, of which 2 more battalions were to be set up (presumably including
[Volkssturm-Bataillon] 40/70).

- The remaining Volkssturm-Bataillones were considered static battalions.

Source:

G2 Periodic Report XV US Corps No. 219 of 21.03.1945
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sven30 comments

Quote from Wolfgang Grote

- Squad II: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/408, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/410, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/412, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/414 &
[Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/416
- Squad III: [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/411, [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/413 & [Volkssturm-Bataillon] 27/415

Sven30 responds:

... here I am also quite skeptical (at the source), because according to the decree "Execution of the Fuehrer decree on the formation of the
German Volkssturm" the Volkssturm-Bataillon of the first contingent may also be used locally in combat missions, the Volkssturm-Bataillon of
the following contingents only within the district. And from the Reichsgau Sachsen to Westmark it is a few kilometers.

Another problem that I see with this reorganization is that the Volkssturm-Bataillon dem Reichsgauleiter of the setting Reichsgau were directly subordinate and no Gauleiter should have watched without problems when "his" Volkssturm-Bataillon were suddenly incorporated into another Reichsgau. I find it difficult to imagine an situation for this.

The Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/414 E was probably deployed in the east, at least most of the missing persons reports came from Bautzen.

Unfortunately, the file situation (once again quite weak) to say something concrete here ... in the meantime, I am thinking about whether I should use the above-called Volkssturm-Bataillon individually and separately for the purpose of further data collection ... :/

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wolfgang Grote responds

Good evening Sven,

The source I quoted is based on German documents captured and translated by the Americans.
Why should Americans misrepresent these documents? There were enough members of the US Army who spoke perfectly German.

In addition, this information is confirmed by statements of German prisoners to the XXI US Corps and also by the Daily Order No. 2 of the Position Battalion I/I (formerly Fortress Infantry Battalion 1410 or Security Battalion Friedrich) of 14.01.1945.

This order confirms the renaming of the following Volkssturm battalions:

- Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/377 (Saarlautern-Hanus) renamed Volkssturm Battalion 40/3
- Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/379 (Saarlautern, Treseler) renamed Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/9
- Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/287 (Saarbrücken, Neufang) renamed Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/17

This actually has nothing to do with Volkssturm-Bataillones in Saxony or with the transfer of Volkssturm-Bataillones from Saarland to Saxony.

All this information cannot be wrong, but I leave it to you to believe in this renumbering or not.

Maybe you should research in the direction of whether there was not also a renumbering at the same time in Saxony.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sven30 responds [correctly]

Actually, so my question:

Why are units of the Volkssturm set up in the Reichsgau Westmark (Reichsgau No. 40), which in turn were assigned to the Reichsgau Saxony (Reichsgau No. 27). The Reichsgau numbers were clearly regulated and firmly assigned, which is why the Volkssturm-Bataillones could also be
clearly assigned: designation of the Volkssturm units.
Last edited by Germanicus on 26 Sep 2021 22:55, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 12:04

New finds and additional information to existing finds from Sven30 [forum-der-wehrmacht.de/index.php?board/86-einheiten-des-volkssturms/]

Please see Sven30 thread below to discover the reason why I posted [?] in relation to Kreis Sankt Ingbert and relate to post above.

link - https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... t-ingbert/

Volkssturm-Bataillon 10/46 // Volkssturm-Bataillon Frankfurt 1

Volkssturm-Bataillon 21/32 // Volkssturm-Bataillon 21/32 V // Volkssturm-Bataillon 32 V​
Volkssturm-Bataillon 21/71 // Volkssturm-Bataillon 21/71 V

Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/287 (Saarbrücken, Neufang) renamed Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/17 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/377 (Saarlautern-Hanus) renamed Volkssturm Battalion 40/3 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/379 (Saarlautern, Treseler) renamed Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/9 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/408 (II. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/409 (I. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/410 (II. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/411 (III. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/412 (II. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/413 (III. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/415 (III. Aufgebot) [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/416 (II. Aufgebot) [?]

Volkssturm-Bataillon 32/323
Volkssturm-Bataillon 32/333
Volkssturm-Bataillon 32/546 // Volkssturm-Bataillon Pfeiffer

Volkssturm-Bataillon 33/380 // Volkssturm-Bataillon 380
Volkssturm-Bataillon 33/587 (I. Aufgebot)

Volkssturm-Bataillon 34/69 // Volkssturm-Bataillon Thüringen
Volkssturm-Bataillon 34/466

Volkssturm-Bataillon 36/70

Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/27 (I. Aufgebot)
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/65 (I. Aufgebot)
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/70 // Volkssturm-Bataillon St. Ingbert
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/408 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/408 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/410 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 410 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/408
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/411 (III. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/411 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/412 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/412 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/413 (III. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/413 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/414 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/414 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/415 (III. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/415 [?]
Volkssturm-Bataillon 40/416 (II. Aufgebot) // Volkssturm-Bataillon 27/416 [?]

Volkssturm-Bataillon Beelitz
Volkssturm-Bataillon Blumau
Volkssturm-Bataillon Braunlage
Volkssturm-Bataillon Brosig // Volkssturm-Bataillon Brosig Pfeiffer​
Volkssturm-Bataillon Burg 1
Volkssturm-Bataillon Burg 2
Volkssturm-Bataillon Burg 3
Volkssturm-Bataillon Burg 4
Volkssturm-Bataillon Deutsche Werke / Werk Gotenhafen
Volkssturm-Bataillon Dietrich (mot.)
Volkssturm-Bataillon Frankfurt 1 (I. Aufgebot)
Volkssturm-Bataillon Frankfurt 2
Volkssturm-Bataillon Frankfurt 3
Volkssturm-Bataillon Frankfurt 4
Volkssturm-Bataillon Grosser
Volkssturm Bataillon Ratibor IX
Volkssturm-Bataillon Sonneberg I
Volkssturm-Bataillon Kreis Steinburg​ (I. Aufgebot)
Volkssturm-Bataillon Syke (I. Aufgebot)
Volkssturm-Bataillon Weinstadt

Volkssturm-Einheit Brettheim

​​https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... lkssturms/

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 26 Sep 2021 22:51

New finds

"A total of fourteen battalions comprised the Kreis Celle."

Volkssturm-Bataillon I Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon II Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon III Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon IV Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon V Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon VI Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon VII Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon VIII Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon IX Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon X Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon XI Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon XII Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon XIII Kreis Celle
Volkssturm-Bataillon XIV Kreis Celle

https://found-places.blogspot.com/2020/ ... celle.html

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 28 Sep 2021 00:55

From www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de
Division 905
Wolfgang Grote
Sep 12th 2021
Hallo Zusammen,

in Anlehnung an den Thread in Bezug auf die 553. Volksgrenadierdivision eröffne ich hier einen Thread hinsichtlich der Division 905, die zwischen dem 11.01.1945 und dem 27.03.1945 im Einsatz war.

Die Division 905 hatte ihren Ursprung am 11.01.1945 in der Umbenennung der Division von Witzleben in Division 905; die Division unterstand zu diesem Zeitpunkt dem XIV. SS Armeekorps.

Gliederung der Division von Witzleben am 07.01.1945:

1) Grenadierregiment 1 Oberrhein (Oefele) mit:
- I. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Mäder)
- II. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Kirchmann)
- IX. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (von Neuenstein)
- I. Landesschützenbataillon Oberrhein (Buchner)

2) Grenadierregiment 2 Oberrhein (Zeifang) mit:
- III. Zollgrenzschutzbataillon (Kursava)
- IV. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Stürmlinger)
- IV. Grenadierbataillon Oberrhein (Wagner)

3) Grenadierregiment 13 Oberrhein (Remischberger) mit:
- III. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Huber)
- V. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Schmidt)
- XXI. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon (Fiehler)

4) Divisionsreserve mit:
- I./Grenadierregiment Oberrhein (Rossner) = Grenadier-Ersatz- und Ausbildungsbataillon 435
- Festungs-Artillerie-Abteilung 1539 mit 2 Batterie mit jeweils 4 Geschütze 12,2 cm rus.

Am 22.01.1945 wurde die Division 905 dem XXXIX. Panzerkorps unterstellt und es erfolgte eine Umorganisation der Division, bei der die Volkssturmbataillone der Division 405 unterstellt wurden. Die Division 405 war zu diesem Zeitpunkt dem XIV. SS Armeekorps unterstellt und lag zwischen Bruchsal und Elzach.

Zur Information, nachstehend die Gliederung der Division 405 am 21.01.1945:

1) Grenadierregiment 1 Oberrhein mit:
- I. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- II. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- IX. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon

2) Grenadierregiment 12 Oberrhein (ex. Grenadierregiment B) mit:
- III. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- V. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- XXI. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon

3) Grenadierregiment C mit:
- IV. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- III. Zollgrenzschutzbataillon

4) Grenadierregiment 10 Oberrhein mit:
- VI. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- X. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- II. Landesschützenbataillon Oberrhein

5) Grenadierregiment 14 Oberrhein mit:
- Landesschützenbataillon 406
- 1 Kompanie/VII. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- II. Zollgrenzschutzbataillon

6) Grenadierregiment 4 Oberrhein mit:
- Landesschützenbataillon Weigand (Landesschützenbataillon 1095)
- I/131/Badisches Volkssturmbataillon
- VIII. Badisches Volkssturmbataillon

Gliederung der Division 905 am 25.01.1945:

1) Grenadierregiment 2 Oberrhein - Zeifang - mit:
- Grenadierbataillon XIII Oberrhein (Künstlin)
- Grenadierbataillon XVI Oberrhein (Thomas)
- Grenadierbataillon XVII Oberrhein (Hurst)
- Grenadierbataillon IV Oberrhein (Wagner)

2) Grenadierregiment 13 Oberrhein - Remischberger - mit:
- Grenadierbataillon I Oberrhein (Störr)
- Landesschützenbataillon III Oberrhein (Metzger)

3) Pionierbataillon 405 (Terjung)
4) Landesschützenbataillon I Oberrhein (Mund) als Divisionsreserve

Fortsetzung folgt.

Quelle: KTB der Division 905

https://www.forum-der-wehrmacht.de/inde ... ang-grote/

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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 28 Sep 2021 00:56

Volkssturm in Kolberg

nachstehend einige Informationen hinsichtlich der Organisation des Volkssturms in Kolberg:

Es gab insgesamt 4 Volkssturmbataillone in Kolberg, die in einem Volkssturmregiment unter dem Kommando des SA-Standartenführer Pfeiffer zusammengefasst waren.

- Das Volkssturmbataillon des I. Aufgebots wurde am 04.02.1945 per Bahn in den Raum Schneidemühl transportiert. Dort kam das Bataillon Ende
Februar 1945 zum Einsatz und wurde weitgehend aufgerieben.

- Das Volkssturmbataillon "Kolberg I" unter dem Kommando des Bataillonsführer Kastenbein
- Das Volkssturmbataillon "Kolberg II" unter dem Kommando des Bataillonsführer Hans Petersen
- Ein weiteres Volkssturmbataillon unter dem Kommando des Bataillonsführers Uplegger **
- Eine unabhängige Volkssturmkompanie unter dem Kommando des Kompanieführers Hauptmann der Reserve Schulz
- Eine unabhängige Volkssturmkompanie für den Wachdienst, die sich am 07./08.03.1945 selbst auflöste

- Einen Volkssturm-Werferzug

Quelle: Die letzten Tage von Kolberg von Johannes Voelker

**
es kam tatsächlich ein drittes Volkssturmbataillon in Kolberg zum Einsatz; ich weiss nun nicht, ob dieses Bataillon die Bezeichnung Volkssturmbataillon "Kolberg III" trug. Der Bataillonsführer war Uplegger.

Quelle: Die letzten Tage von Kolberg von Johannes Voelker

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 28 Sep 2021 01:00

Volksturm-Bataillon "Porta Nigra"

Bataillonsführer: Hauptmann Jakob Theiss
Bataillons-Adjudant: Leutnant Josef Kraemer

Offiziere im Bataillons-Stab: Zugführer Karl Goertz, Oberleutnant Julius Minges, Oberleutnant Georg Pfeffer, Leutnant Hubert Scheitgen

Kompanieführer 1. Kompanie: Paul Seibert / Johann Nilles
Offiziere in der 1. Kompanie: Zugführer Alfons Riedmayer

Kompanieführer 2. Kompanie:
Offiziere in der 2. Kompanie: Oberleutnant Rudolf Forstmeyer

Kompanieführer 3. Kompanie: Hauptmann Jakob Centner
Offiziere der 3. Kompanie: Oberleutnant Franz Hemmerling

Kompanieführer 4. Kompanie:
Offiziere in der 4. Kompanie: Zugführer Friedrich Walther

Zugführer Infanterie-Geschützzug: Oberleutnant Niederpruem

Sonstige Offiziere: Leutnant Jakob Kellermann, Leutnant Karl Winterhäuser, Leutnant Friedrich Funk, Leutnant Dr. Werner Knecht, Oberleutnant Richard Hess.

- Einsatzorte und Gefangenenzahlen

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 28 Sep 2021 01:02

Volkssturm-Bataillons "Ruwer"

Das Bataillon bestand aus 4 Kompanien mit einer Gesamtstärke von 750 Mann; Einheitsführer:

- Bataillonsführer: Bose

- Führer der 1. Kompanie: von Thomm
- Führer der 2. Kompanie: Reidenbach (Politischer Führer von Plurich (?))
- Führer der 3. Kompanie: Lommel (Politischer Führer von Kasel)
- Führer der 4. Kompanie: Kraemer (Politischer Führer von Schweich)

Quelle: G2 Periodic Report Nr. 207 vom XX. US Korps vom 04.03.1945.

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Germanicus
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Re: An extensive list of Volkssturm-Bataillons?

Post by Germanicus » 28 Sep 2021 01:34

Volkssturm-Bataillon 18/2 // Volkssturm-Bataillon Birkenfeld

Aufstellungsort:

Birkenfeld, Kreis Birkenfeld - Baumholder / Reichsgau Moselland

Aufstellungszeitpunkt:

12. November 1944

Einheitsführer:

Bataillonsführer: Parteigenosse Hinzmann oder Hintzmann

Kompanieführer der 1. Kompanie: Wolf
Kompanieführer der 2. Kompanie: Stahl, wurde von den Amerikanern gefangengenommen
Kompanieführer der 3. Kompanie: Weber
Kompanieführer der 4. Kompanie: Sotter
Organisation:

Das Bataillon gehörte zu den insgesamt 8 Volkssturmbataillonen, die im Kreis Birkenfeld-Baumholder aufgestellt wurden.
[The battalion was one of a total of 8 Volkssturm battalions that were set up in the Birkenfeld-Baumholder district.]

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