Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Discussions on the foreigners (volunteers as well as conscripts) fighting in the German Wehrmacht, those collaborating with the Axis and other period Far Right organizations. Hosted by George Lepre.
daveshoup2MD
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by daveshoup2MD » 30 Apr 2021 05:29

Takao wrote:
29 Apr 2021 21:25
LineDoggie wrote:
29 Apr 2021 00:04
daveshoup2MD wrote:
28 Apr 2021 22:58
Komi wrote:
28 Apr 2021 11:04
LineDoggie wrote:
28 Apr 2021 01:44
They had the traitor Martin James Monti a Defecting USAAF pilot who became a Waffen-SS Untersturmführer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_James_Monti
Yes I've heard of him. As I mentioned there were American individuals who ended up in the German armed forces, but there doesn't seem to have been any attempt to recruit a unit of them, even a minuscule one like the British Free Corps. I was curious why that was the case.
daveshoup2MD wrote:
28 Apr 2021 05:01
Because even the most deluded bundist in 1939 knew the odds in 1942 and afterwards?
And the men who joined the British Free Corps in 1943 didn't?
Perhaps not, given your own post.

Not to single out Lindbergh, but even he tried to join up, and ended up overseas as a civilian contractor and flew multiple combat missions. Mosley was interned until 1943 and then under house arrest; interesting contrast.
Mosley's son won the MC in Italy with the Rifle Brigade
Col Lindbergh still held a reserve commission and hard for some to remember but JFK & Gerry Ford were both America Firster's
America First was not a pro-Nazi group, and their members joined for a variety of reasons.

The American pro-Nazis joined the Bund.
Yes and no. Some did both.

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Takao
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by Takao » 30 Apr 2021 11:07

daveshoup2MD wrote:
30 Apr 2021 05:29
Yes and no. Some did both.
Some did, but only some.
The America First Committee was isolationist and against sending Americans to fight in the European War - Hardly a fertile field to recruit men to fight for Germany.

The German American Bund had their own training camps and were distinctly pro-German. So there is a much better chance of getting recruits to fight for Germany. However, the German-Americans that did heed the call to return to the Fatherland, were seen as German, not American(which has been mentioned earlier).

daveshoup2MD
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by daveshoup2MD » 01 May 2021 03:05

Takao wrote:
30 Apr 2021 11:07
daveshoup2MD wrote:
30 Apr 2021 05:29
Yes and no. Some did both.
Some did, but only some.
The America First Committee was isolationist and against sending Americans to fight in the European War - Hardly a fertile field to recruit men to fight for Germany.

The German American Bund had their own training camps and were distinctly pro-German. So there is a much better chance of getting recruits to fight for Germany. However, the German-Americans that did heed the call to return to the Fatherland, were seen as German, not American(which has been mentioned earlier).
True enough. All in all, perhaps there were just more aspiring Fascists in the British Army.

LineDoggie
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by LineDoggie » 04 May 2021 04:40

daveshoup2MD wrote:
30 Apr 2021 05:28


Mosley's son was, presumably, an honorable individual. Lindbergh, albeit a fellow traveler in the 1930s, was decent enough to offer his services against the Axis. He was also a generation older than Ford and JFK; presumably he should have known better. Mosley certainly should have.
"Known better"? why should we have wanted to go to war in 1939?

we've no deal with the British to defend each other and many Americans believed we were suckered into the first war with Wellington house propaganda

its like the Zimmermann telegram

cue the outrage at the Huns offering California, etc to Mexico

there was no way the German navy blockaded was going to get past the Home fleet and across the Atlantic and lay off say Vera Cruz to unload war material to the Mexicans without the RN & USN intercepting said shipping. AND the Mexican GHQ was soiling themselves at the thought of taking an invasion into the lower 48 they werent fools
"There are two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are dead and those who are going to die. Now let’s get the hell out of here".
Col. George Taylor, 16th Infantry Regiment, Omaha Beach

LineDoggie
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by LineDoggie » 04 May 2021 04:41

daveshoup2MD wrote:
01 May 2021 03:05
Takao wrote:
30 Apr 2021 11:07
daveshoup2MD wrote:
30 Apr 2021 05:29
Yes and no. Some did both.
Some did, but only some.
The America First Committee was isolationist and against sending Americans to fight in the European War - Hardly a fertile field to recruit men to fight for Germany.

The German American Bund had their own training camps and were distinctly pro-German. So there is a much better chance of getting recruits to fight for Germany. However, the German-Americans that did heed the call to return to the Fatherland, were seen as German, not American(which has been mentioned earlier).
Certainly a certain retired king was a admirer of the bohemian lance jack

True enough. All in all, perhaps there were just more aspiring Fascists in the British Army.
"There are two kinds of people who are staying on this beach: those who are dead and those who are going to die. Now let’s get the hell out of here".
Col. George Taylor, 16th Infantry Regiment, Omaha Beach

daveshoup2MD
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Re: Why was there no American equivalent to the British Free Corps?

Post by daveshoup2MD » 04 May 2021 04:48

LineDoggie wrote:
04 May 2021 04:40
daveshoup2MD wrote:
30 Apr 2021 05:28


Mosley's son was, presumably, an honorable individual. Lindbergh, albeit a fellow traveler in the 1930s, was decent enough to offer his services against the Axis. He was also a generation older than Ford and JFK; presumably he should have known better. Mosley certainly should have.
"Known better"? why should we have wanted to go to war in 1939?
"Go to war" in 1939? Who said that?

But understanding that an advanced power like Germany in control of Europe, and in alliance with Japan, was a very real threat to the Western Hemisphere? And standing by why the non-Axis European nations were picked off?

One would have to be blind not to see what was coming ...

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