French SS Officers

Discussions on the foreigners (volunteers as well as conscripts) fighting in the German Wehrmacht, those collaborating with the Axis and other period Far Right organizations. Hosted by George Lepre.
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Dimitrii
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Post by Dimitrii » 25 Jan 2006 16:26

Georg doesn't have anything against the French, where did you get that last impression? Georg is simply saying that France has a trauma still from the WW2 and that it touches a lot of nerves.

(Insults removed by Moderator)

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Georg_S
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Post by Georg_S » 25 Jan 2006 18:43

Daniel Laurent wrote:
Georg wrote: I can´t believe even 60 years after WWII still the wounds are so open for the French people
Just showing that you know almost nothing about the French history....
It´s a pity it´s like that, and I still are thinking of how it looked before the WWII, the greatest bastard ever existed before WWII was a frenchmann Napoleon Bonaparte,
Would you mind to elaborate a bit about the man who spread the ideals of the French Republican revolution all over Europe and was beaten only by a coalition of dictatorial autocrats such as the Kings of Prussia, of England, the Emperor of Austria-Hungary and the Tsar of Russia?
but today he is"rehabilitated" and if you are interested in him and his history you are cultivated, but if you are interessted in Waffen-SS and as for me especailly in KZ/KL´s you must be a nazi.... I have to exzplain myself everytime someone visits me bcause of all the books and photos about and of the SS.
I am interested in history. Have a look to the little pages I posted about the French collaboration:
http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=7259
Now, what exactly do you have after the French?
May we know?
Regards
Daniel
I think you missunderstood me. Once again before the wwII the greatest "bastard" besides France was Napoleon Bonaparte but after the WWII it was Hitler and Nazi Germany. And then why I asked why the French look at the War with an open wound even after 60 years, For me it´s insane even if is a Pole, Dutch Norwegian, Dane etc etc.... judging people from Germany or their relatives or as in your case badly treat people who happens to be relative to a volunteer in the Waffen-SS, I wonder if they have thought about it clearly, WHAT on the earth have the kids to a volunteer to do with the war especially if they are born after the war. How can those people judge them for what their father or grandfather did? And that no matter what country they come from. In this case you talked about France and I took up a occasion have nothing more I have similiar stories from Norway, but I depends on who you are talking to.

I am pretty aware of French history, as you know in Sweden we have a king which family came from France. One of Napoleons officers.

I also have the oportunity to meet SS-Hstuf Henri Fenet some years ago. so I don´t have anything against the people in France. Just a good advice in most friendly tone.

//Georg

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Georg_S
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Post by Georg_S » 25 Jan 2006 18:45

Dimitrii wrote:Georg doesn't have anything against the French, where did you get that last impression? Georg is simply saying that France has a trauma still from the WW2 and that it touches a lot of nerves.
Exactly, thanks for your help

Best regards,

Georg

George Lepre
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Post by George Lepre » 26 Jan 2006 03:35

Several insults have been removed from this thread. All three of you are knowledgable members so let's keep the tone civil.

Daniel - I carefully read the entire thread and do not believe that georg bears any animosity towards France. And as you know from Feldgrau, I do not allow people to insult the land of Lafayette!

Best regards,

George

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Daniel Laurent
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Post by Daniel Laurent » 26 Jan 2006 07:06

Hi, Georg and Dimitri,
I had, how to say?
Is "A bad hair day" the correct expression?
:oops: :x
Kindly accepts my apologises

But still I wonder why Georg thinks that Napoleon was a "bastard"? That's the stuff which throw me in the wrong direction...

I am afraid it's a bit out of topic in this forum, so if Georg wish to tell me why, it is preferable to do it through PM.
Decent reply warranted
Regards
Daniel

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Serbian boy
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Post by Serbian boy » 26 Jan 2006 23:18

Napoleon was one of the gretaest general in European history.

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Georg_S
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Post by Georg_S » 27 Jan 2006 09:54

I am not a "master" of writing in English so what I meant about Napoleon is that a common thought about Napoleon before Hitler or nazism the common opinion about Napoleon was similiar as it is for Hitler nowadays. Many similiar things and opinions is written about other kins and emperors, The thing about Napolon was a reaction of how the relatives to the former Waffen-SS was treated.
In Sweden we mention as example a Danish king Christian the terrible, but I Denmark he mentioned as Christians the Great, we also have many names on Tsar Peter of Russia, but In Russia they have only good to say about him nowadays.
More examples is Fritz der Grösse of Preussia, several countries wouldn´t call him the greatest instead they have their bad names for him. Just as many countries have about Napoleon

//Georg

ZeitGeist
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Post by ZeitGeist » 27 Jan 2006 11:49

Daniel,
What a pity for the names deleted. This is an absolute proof that freedom in France has been dead for a long time now.

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Daniel Laurent
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Post by Daniel Laurent » 27 Jan 2006 12:02

ZeitGeist wrote:Daniel,
What a pity for the names deleted. This is an absolute proof that freedom in France has been dead for a long time now.
Freedom of speech for "some" has been deleted.
Remember Touvier, Bousquet, Papon, elderly people brought to the court decades after the facts.
Till date, being a family member of Fenet, Appolot or any other volunteer is a handicap. And I deleted those names because I was asked by the descendants. What to tell them? No? Difficult.
It seems that only a handfull of "specialists" can make the difference between a volunteer of the East Front and a Gestapo French associate.
For "Mr. Everybody", it is the same.
That is the little backfire of the (Justified in the context) creation by Charles de Gaulle of the Free French and Resistance mythology.
From 40 millions of Petainists in 1942, France found itself having 40 millions of Resistants in 1944...
We have to understand this, it was necessary to immediately cool down everybody and to heal ASAP the wounds of the tough civil war that affected France from 43 to 45.
It was a success, kudo General de Gaulle, but some consequences are still visible today.

But I still have my list.... send me a PM :wink:
Regards
Daniel

Mikedc
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Re: Valentin Patzak

Post by Mikedc » 23 Sep 2012 22:35

Hello Juanjo,
As far as I can tell Valentin Patzak was no Frenchmen.
He was born on 09-01-1912.
Member NSDAP: 738.594
Member SS: 290.189
Promoted to SS-Ostuf on 20-04-1939.
Later on promoted to SS-Hstuf.
In 12-1941 he was the German authority for operations in Bad Nauheim where the members from the American embassy-staff were held prisoner.
From 01-04-1944 till 31-07(or 08)1944 he followed a shortened officerscourse through the 4. Lehrgang für Germanische Offiziere at the SS-Junkerschule in Bad Tölz.
He was promoted to SS-Ustuf d.R. on 09-11-1944.

Greetings, Mike

Halfdan S.
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Re: Valentin Patzak

Post by Halfdan S. » 05 Jun 2021 21:23

Mikedc wrote:
23 Sep 2012 22:35
... Valentin Patzak was no Frenchmen.
... In 12-1941 he was the German authority for operations in Bad Nauheim where the members from the American embassy-staff were held prisoner.
Anything more on this?

Cheers
Halfdan S.

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