Battle of Britain 1940- unpublished pics.

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Bill Medland
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Battle of Britain 1940- unpublished pics.

Post by Bill Medland » 30 Oct 2002 17:05

I obtained these pics several years ago, sadly I was not the one who took them out of the photo album, so the captions are lost forever.
Regards,Bill.
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Bill Medland
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Post by Bill Medland » 30 Oct 2002 17:27

I would like any information on the types of aircraft or the KC Holder, feel welcome to copy the pics if you can use them in your collections.
Regards,Bill.
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Christian Ankerstjerne
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Post by Christian Ankerstjerne » 30 Oct 2002 19:06

Perhaps you should specify 'private' collection... 8)
Christian

Caldric
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Post by Caldric » 30 Oct 2002 19:13

Nice pictures Bill.


The plane that has the German soldiers leaning on the engine cowl looks like an He-111, the one fly low along the beach looks like a Ju-88, is hard to tell really, the He and Ju look somewhat a like. I think however the one near the beach has the big cowl that the Ju88 had, the He had the slim scooped cowl.

The crashed British plane is a Beaufort Bomber.

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Bill Medland
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Post by Bill Medland » 30 Oct 2002 19:40

Christian, Private collections was what I had in mind.

Caldric, thanks for the info on the aircraft types, I wonder if the Beaufort
could be pinned down to a time and event by the serial number?

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Post by Caldric » 30 Oct 2002 20:02

Might be able to, the MW is for Beaufort Bomber, if the rest could be read maybe pin it to a squadron and even a date that it was shot down or crashed.

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Daniel L
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Post by Daniel L » 30 Oct 2002 20:31

Nice pictures! By the look of the tail and sillouette of that plane who fly along the beach it looks more like a Heinkel 111 than a Junkers 88.

regards/ daniel

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Battle of Britain Pics

Post by Lobscouse » 31 Oct 2002 05:01

Handley Page Hampden I would say, because of the rear turret.

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David E M
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Post by David E M » 31 Oct 2002 07:54

Well, here we go! another controversy in the making!, :D I thought it was a Boulton-Paul Defiant, though, have to admit, it looks a bit big for that, rear turret and cockpit look like a Defiant though.
cheers.

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Post by Caldric » 31 Oct 2002 09:58

The first to letters in the call sign designate the Unit or Squadron. It is a Beaufort, you can look up RAF markings and it will show it. Also it is much to large for the fighter Defiant. No need for controversy. MW- Beaufort of the 217 Squadron from St.Eval / Thorney Island, the first two letter indicate the Squadron or unit, the third is the individual aircraft, if you could make it out you could research it down to who was flying it, when they went missing, and what happened to it to make it crash if they knew.


Plus you can look at the lightning bolt looking rudder connection to the fin and trim tab location, this was a Beaufort.

217 St. Eval/Cornwall 01/10/39 Day of month arbitrary. Aircraft, the Beaufort I, 05/40. Perfect timing for the Battle of Britian

On 15 March 1937, No.217 reformed as a general reconnaissance squadron at Boscombe Down equipped with Ansons. On the outbreak of World War Two, it took up its station and bagan flying patrols over the western approaches to the English Channel. For the next two years it was based at St.Eval which it occupied in an unfinished state in October 1939. In May 1940 No.217 began to receive Beauforts but teething troubles prevented these from being used operationally until 25 September and the Ansons did not end their patrols until December. The Beauforts concentrated on attacks on enemy shipping and minelaying until transferred to Ceylon in May.

Motto: "Woe to the unwary"

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Bill Medland
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Post by Bill Medland » 31 Oct 2002 17:23

Wow! thanks Caldric, great info about the 217 Sqn.
I lived as a child at RAF St.Eval in Cornwall, (most of my family were in the RAF including myself later).

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Post by Caldric » 31 Oct 2002 20:25

Welcome Bill, I was thinking you might get some information about the aircraft in question if perhaps there is a veterans association or something for the Squadron. Or they may even be interested in such a photo, never know what history might be missing. Just a thought.

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Petho
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Brilliant!

Post by Petho » 31 Oct 2002 21:55

Thanks for the picutres!

I can't even begin to imagine what it would be like flying so close to the water..

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Beaufort it is.

Post by Lobscouse » 01 Nov 2002 00:09

I guess it takes more than a turret to make a plane, and that is what I based my assumption on.
I know nothing about call signs and such, but on a second look I see a Beaufort tailplane.

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Bill Medland
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Post by Bill Medland » 01 Nov 2002 04:49

Hey Petho! in my RAF days, we flew only 10 meters above the water! :D
But that was over Northern Ireland, and everything was allowed then :wink:
warm regards,Bill.

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