WW2 monuments

Discussions on WW2 in Western Europe & the Atlantic.
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ritterkreuz1945
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Post by ritterkreuz1945 » 23 Aug 2006 05:11

close up
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PJF
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Post by PJF » 23 Aug 2006 23:18

more...

the first is from Sachsenhausen at the 60th anniv. of the camp's liberation in 2005

the second is the memorial at the edge of the Lustgarten in Berlin commemorating the communist underground cell known as the "Baum Gruppe" which firebombed the anti-soviet exhibition being held on the Lustgarten in 1942...several hundred jews and communists were arrested and murdered as a reprisal for the attack
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Fallschirmjäger
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Any fallschirmjäger ones?

Post by Fallschirmjäger » 24 Aug 2006 00:15

Xavier wrote:my two cents.
german war memorials page
http://www.kriegerdenkmal.com/
Xavier
Instandsetzungtruppfuhrer


Are there any fallschirmjäger ones or other luftwaffe ground troops like herman goring divsion,field divisions etc.. on that site,and an english translation device there?,thanks.

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G. Trifkovic
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Post by G. Trifkovic » 03 Sep 2006 22:30

Monument at Tjentiste, commemorating the Battle of Sutjeska ("Operation Schwarz")

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Dan W.
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Post by Dan W. » 08 Oct 2006 01:23

This is one of the more beautiful and obscure monuments that I ran across in Washington D.C., a gift to the United States from the Netherlands. Not pictured, except in the middle shot, and not very well, are the many beautiful flowers surrounding this monument. Also, if one were to climb to the top of the tower you would have an outstanding view of downtown Washington D.C., where you can see the three importnat landmarks from in the hazy distance. This tower is located only about a couple hundred yards away from the Iwo Jima Memorial and is next to Arlington National Cemetary



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KPM1944
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German military cemetry.

Post by KPM1944 » 08 Oct 2006 14:07

I live in Ireland and there is a German military cemetry in Glencree, Co. Wicklow, despite the fact that Ireland was neutral and not involved in the second or first world wars. It is a beautiful place, quiet, peaceful and very sad. The story of how it all came about goes like this but parts of the story are unsubstanciated. As Ireland was a neutral country during the war any German bomber planes which suffered hits during raids over England would try to make it to Ireland if they thought they could not make it back to German held territory. The same applied to U-boats, they would try and make Irish waters. Those that were caught after crash landing or arrested on beaches or coastal villages were interned in the Curragh military camp until the wars end. Those who died from their injuries were buried in a plot in the Curragh camp or in church grounds near where they were found.
However this is where a twist comes into the story, there was a monastery in the Wicklow mountains on the east coast of Ireland in a place called Glencree. This monastery was run by an order of monks and a German plane which had been hit in a bombing raid over England flew in low over the mountains. The pilots and crew bailed out and the Free State police (Garda) and soldiers were looking for them for several days, but no sign of them was found. However some of the monks had seen the crew bail out and found two dead and 3 more injured, 2 badly from both gunshot/shrapnel wounds and the landings. The monks took the bodies and the survivors back to the monastery and tended to them. those of the crew that had died and a further two who subsequently died from their wounds were buried in a beautiful plot beside the monastery.
After the wars end, the monks informed the Irish government and the new German government of the location of the graves. The area was given to over for use of German soldiers, airmen, and sailors who had died on Irish soil or whose bodies had been recovered and interred elsewhere. As such, those that had been buried in the Curragh camp and elsewhere during the war, and those who had been lost at sea during the 1st world war were all exhumed and reburied in the cemetery in Glencree.
It is a beautiful, peaceful place where the German ambassador is guest of honour at a service held every year at which some relatives of those buried there attend. I tell you this in case any of you are visiting Ireland. Glencree is only about 30 km south of Dublin and well worth a visit. I have attached pictures of the some of the many headstones and some others of the cemetery. The website for Glencree visitor centre is http://www.glencree.ie/index.htm
But there is no information on the cemetery as it is controlled and looked after by the German embassy. However it is only a few yards across the road from the old monastery if anyone intends to visit. If anyone is intending to visit and would like further information as to the exact location or requires information as to the names of those buried there please message me and I will get back to you.
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Last edited by KPM1944 on 08 Oct 2006 15:04, edited 1 time in total.

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KPM1944
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Post by KPM1944 » 08 Oct 2006 14:12

More pictures of Glencree cemetery.
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spiro
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Post by spiro » 08 Oct 2006 22:58

The monument for the uknown soldier in front of the parliament in Athens.
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KPM1944
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Post by KPM1944 » 08 Oct 2006 23:17

Spiro,
just as a point of interest, do you know anything about the uniform dress that the Greek soldiers are wearing in the picture. Why are they dressed like that, when did that style originate etc.
Many thanks if you can answer that question.............KPM1944

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spiro
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Post by spiro » 08 Oct 2006 23:49

KPM1944 wrote:Spiro,
just as a point of interest, do you know anything about the uniform dress that the Greek soldiers are wearing in the picture. Why are they dressed like that, when did that style originate etc.
Many thanks if you can answer that question.............KPM1944



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evzones

grassi
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Re: WW2 monuments

Post by grassi » 01 Jan 2009 22:46

This is a small monument in Arzl (im Pitztal)/Austria.
It's kind of a multi purpose monument, because it is dedicated to the local victims of three wars:
The fights of 1809 during the Napoleonic wars,
the First World War and
the Second World War.


The photos are from Nov. 2nd 2008.
Further info can be found here:
http://www.tiscover.at/at/guide/5,de,SC ... ntern.html

grassi
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grassi
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Re: WW2 monuments

Post by grassi » 03 Jan 2009 11:00

This is a plaque for some victims in Prague in May 7-8th 1945.
It is near the Hradschin, more or less over the Hirschgraben.
A little silver wreath decorates this memorial.
This is typical for Prague:
Many WWII plagues and silver wreaths of the same style can be found all over the city.

The photo is from September 10th 2008.

grassi
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phylo_roadking
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Re: WW2 monuments

Post by phylo_roadking » 18 Jan 2009 01:40

A few years ago the authorities on Crete raised this memorial and landscaped memorial garden at the site of the ambush and kidnapping of Gen. Kreipe by Paddy Fermor and Billy Moss.

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This is the memorial on the cliffs above St Valery-en-Caux to the 51st (Highland) Division, who surrendered to Rommel in June 1940 there, having been intentionally left off the OLYMPIC evacuation as a demonstration of London's intentions not to abandon the French.

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In St.Valery-en-Caux itself is the monument to the French 2nd Light Cavalry Division, who attempted to delay Rommel's approach to the coast at St Valery in 1940...by actually doing what was attributed to cavalry elsewhere and charging Rommel's tanks at swordpoint.

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phylo_roadking
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Re: WW2 monuments

Post by phylo_roadking » 18 Jan 2009 02:07

...and suprisingly THIS is a war memorial, and one of the most poignant ones I've ever seen; a private citizen's memorial set into the wall of a house just off the town square in Galatas on Crete, erected just after the war and let go into disrepair over the decades, though obviously ocasionally repainted - these are the actual sideskirts of Roy Farran's Vickers Light tank...

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friend_of_Obersalzberg
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Re: WW2 monuments

Post by friend_of_Obersalzberg » 19 Jan 2009 10:51

Hello,

THANKS for the nice phtos, KPM1944!

I tried to translate this...it´s difficult, because it sounds a bit strange in German already...

Monument%20with%20German%20inscription_.JPG


The dead was my fate
Under the Irish sky
And a bed in the good ground of Ireland+
What I have dreamed and planned
bonded me to the Fatherland+
But the war show me to sleep in Glencree+
There was harm and pain
what I lost and won+
If you pass by
take me in prayer
so that loss change into blessing

Greetings
Ralf
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