Soviet invasion?

Discussions on WW2 in Eastern Europe.
Ezboard

Soviet invasion?

Post by Ezboard » 29 Sep 2002 12:22

Ramsey
Unregistered User
(6/19/00 2:03:44 pm)
Reply Soviet invasion?
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Do you think Stalin had any plans to invade Germany (or other parts of Europe) before the german invasion?

Marcus Wendel
Administrator
(6/19/00 10:41:08 pm)
Reply Re: Soviet invasion?
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Personally I believe that Stalin was planning to invade Germany (and a few other countries) but not that he was preparing to invade as the germans launched Barbarossa.

/Marcus

Leonidas
Unregistered User
(6/20/00 10:45:41 pm)
Reply Stalin
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Some archeological research and newly opened documents have both inicated that Stalin were planning an western campaign. But it was ment to start as late as 1945. It gives new light to the Molotov pact, considering the Soviets maintaining it.

Regretfully I do not remember where I heard, read or saw this...

Chad Crompton
Unregistered User
(6/23/00 8:34:56 pm)
Reply Soviet Invasion
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Hello,

I recently just read an article, that stated that Stalin was planning an invasion of Germany as early as July 6, 1941! Although I am not sure about how correct this article really was!

Cheers,
Chad Crompton

Glenn Steinberg
Unregistered User
(6/23/00 9:28:57 pm)
Reply Re: Soviet Invasion
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Trust me, Chad, the article isn't very accurate.

Stop and think. Every mainstream historian on record, the ones who have examined all the documentary evidence in German and Soviet archives, has said that the tale of Stalin's impending attack on Germany is nothing more than a myth. These historians have come from all over the world and from every possible walk of life.

Only a handful of marginal "historians," all of them Russian or German apologists (Suvorov among them), have argued otherwise, but they put forward their claim without the slightest evidence. Because Zhukov in 1940 briefed a gathering of Soviet commanders on a plan for a war with Germany, discussing a *defensive* battle plan for attacking German territory in the event of a German invasion of the Soviet Union, Suvorov and others claim that Zhukov was working on a plan for a pre-emptive attack on Germany before Barbarossa. Such a claim is frankly hogwash. It's the business of military commanders and planners to consider every possible scenario for potential future wars and to brief commanders on the appropriate plans for each scenario. Zhukov was simply doing his job and planning for the possibility of a war with Germany (and by the way, his defensive plan sucked, as events in 1941 proved -- the Germans had penetrated much too far into the Soviet Union before Zhukov's wonderful plan could even be begun to be set in motion).

I challenge anyone to name a single time that Stalin attacked another powerful nation without being attacked first. Stalin attacked smaller, less powerful nations (e.g., Finland several times, the Baltic states and Romania in 1940, and Japan when it was already defeated by the U.S. and Great Britain). He never once attacked a great and powerful nation such as Germany was in 1941. Stalin was far too smart and cautious to do anything so stupid. He only started fights that he was reasonably sure he would win.

Don't believe everything you read. Some German apologists want to justify Barbarossa by claiming that the Soviets did have plans for a pre-emptive strike, as Hitler had claimed all along in 1941. Some Soviet apologists (such as Suvorov) want to make Zhukov sound more wonderful than he was by portraying him as having understood Germany's strategic plans better than anyone else at the time.

Read mainstream historians. They've studied the documentary evidence. They're trained to understand that documentary evidence. They're paid to write books that interpret and explain that documentary evidence. They're far more trustworthy than some nameless article that makes claims with no basis in historical reality whatsoever.

Chad Crompton
Unregistered User
(6/24/00 1:08:22 am)
Reply Thanks Glenn!
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Hello,

Your point is correct and well taken. The article that I read was based on information from a Mr. Suvorov by the way.

Cheers,
Chad

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