The official AHF WW2 in Africa & the Med quiz thread

Discussions on WW2 in Africa & the Mediterranean. Hosted by Andy H
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Michael Emrys
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Post by Michael Emrys » 28 Feb 2005 03:41

Shrek wrote:'This is not the beginning of the end, but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning'


IIRC, in his memoir he claims that he used that phrase after the battle for Tunisia was over and the Axis had finally been cleared from North Africa. And the complete quote is, "This is not the end. It is not the beginning of the end. But perhaps it is the end of the beginning."

But I am quoting all that from memory of a book I read some 25 years ago, so take it for what it's worth.

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Post by Jon G. » 28 Feb 2005 03:46

He also used the quoted expression in a radio transmitted speech from the House of Commons, though I am not sure when that speech was held.

But as Churchill himself admitted, many of his famous quotes and comebacks were all written down and rehearsed well in advance.

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G. Trifkovic
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Post by G. Trifkovic » 28 Feb 2005 04:16

Speech was given at The Lord Mayor's Luncheon, Mansion House,on November 10th 1942.

But as Churchill himself admitted, many of his famous quotes and comebacks were all written down and rehearsed well in advance.


No doubt,but he was a witty character and I immensly enjoy reading his quotations-spontaneous or not!

http://www.workinghumor.com/quotes/winston_churchill.shtml

Cheers,

Gaius

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Post by Jon G. » 28 Feb 2005 19:45

Well, I don't think that some preparations on his part in any way detract from Churchill's skills as an orator. He always had a memorable quote to hand, and then it doesn't matter if he had written [applause] in the margin beforehand.

Now, back to the question I posed. We're looking for a major settlement that was taken by a mere handful of men - M Squadron, with four fire engines commandeered for the purpose - before a retreating enemy. Year, date, name of city please.

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Post by Jon G. » 02 Mar 2005 05:07

Hint: M Squadron was part of the SBS

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Post by Jon G. » 03 Mar 2005 11:03

Sigh. Hint #2: 1944.

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Michael Emrys
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Post by Michael Emrys » 04 Mar 2005 05:11

Well, I admit I'm stumped. Unless somebody else wants to take a stab, I suggest that you might want to try something a trifle less obscure.

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Post by Jon G. » 04 Mar 2005 11:51

Okay. M Squadron of the SBS, numbering 90-odd men, took Salonika on July 3rd 1944. I didn't think that would be so hard.

This one should be easier I hope.

Totensonntag

What and when is it, and why was the name so appropriate in 1941?

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David W
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Post by David W » 04 Mar 2005 13:24

Day of the dead. 23rd November. 5th S.A Brigade overun, but 22 Arm Brig inflicts heavy losses on D.A.K. Many killed on both sides.

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Post by Jon G. » 04 Mar 2005 13:26

Correct! The climax of the Sidi Rezegh battles fell on Totensonntag - 'Sunday of the Dead', German Remembrance Day.

Over to you, David!

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David W
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Post by David W » 04 Mar 2005 13:35

O.K.

Which British Armoured Brigade became the first to be formed as an armoured brigade group? You may only have one guess each, as there aren't many possible correct answers.
Too make it a little more difficult, try naming the infantry & artillery units that became part of the group at this time.

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Andy H
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Post by Andy H » 13 Mar 2005 16:47

Was it the 2nd?

Andy H

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David W
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Post by David W » 15 Mar 2005 19:13

No, it was not the second.

That's made it a little easier for everyone else!

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Post by Aufklarung » 25 Mar 2005 19:54

4th?

composed of (my bolds):
THE HISTORY OF 4TH ARMOURED BRIGADE wrote:8th Hussars from 7th Armoured Brigade, 3rd Royal Tanks returned from Greece where they had served with 1st Armoured Brigade, and 5th Royal Tanks, survivors of the ill fated 3rd Armoured Brigade, lost in Cyrenaica in April. In addition we were joined by 2nd Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, also from 1st Armoured Brigade, and as our motor battalion we welcomed 2nd Battalion Scots Guards. We were thus the first armoured brigade group ever to be formed.


regards
A :)

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David W
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Post by David W » 26 Mar 2005 00:15

Is correct!!!

I despaired of anyone ever getting it right, although I didn't think it was THAT difficult.

Well done! Your turn.

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