Nukes do not exist

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jesk
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by jesk » 03 Sep 2018 20:43

OpanaPointer wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:38
These "people", do they know physics? Do they know nuclear physics? Why do you believe them and not reality?
The principle of NPP operation is fundamentally different. Uranium, dissolving, gives off heat. When a nuclear explosion is said to be a chain reaction ...

OpanaPointer
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by OpanaPointer » 03 Sep 2018 20:44

Does your "evidence" have anything other that gotchas?
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by OpanaPointer » 03 Sep 2018 20:45

jesk wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:43
OpanaPointer wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:38
These "people", do they know physics? Do they know nuclear physics? Why do you believe them and not reality?
The principle of NPP operation is fundamentally different. Uranium, dissolving, gives off heat. When a nuclear explosion is said to be a chain reaction ...
You have peer-reviewed papers that explain that, right?
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Michael Kenny
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by Michael Kenny » 03 Sep 2018 20:52

Why argue with him?
Would anyone waste time trying to convince a Flat-Earther he was wrong?

jesk
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by jesk » 03 Sep 2018 21:01

Michael Kenny wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:52
Why argue with him?
Would anyone waste time trying to convince a Flat-Earther he was wrong?
73 years waiting for a nuclear explosion, for some reason it does not. Evidence of the era of dinosaurs are less convincing. Nuke of the Taliban, ISIS, in Africa, anywhere.

jesk
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by jesk » 03 Sep 2018 21:04

OpanaPointer wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:45
You have peer-reviewed papers that explain that, right?
there are many

https://www.big-lies.org/nuke-lies/www. ... nuked.html

but it's not enough that I believe someone should apply at least one atomic bomb in real conditions

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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by OpanaPointer » 03 Sep 2018 21:35

jesk wrote:
03 Sep 2018 21:04
OpanaPointer wrote:
03 Sep 2018 20:45
You have peer-reviewed papers that explain that, right?
there are many

https://www.big-lies.org/nuke-lies/www. ... nuked.html

but it's not enough that I believe someone should apply at least one atomic bomb in real conditions
Well, if you have any actually evidence drop by again.
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jesk
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by jesk » 04 Sep 2018 06:17

A huge number of exercises, planes, submarines, cars with atomic bombs and nowhere a single accidental explosion. How carefully it turns out to handle nuclear weapons!

February 13, 1950 – 1950 British Columbia B-36 crash – A simulated nuclear bomb containing TNT and uranium but without the plutonium needed to create a nuclear explosion, was proactively dumped in the Pacific Ocean after a B-36 bomber's engines caught fire during a test of its ability to carry nuclear payloads.The crew reported releasing the weapon out of concern for the amount of TNT inside, alone, before they bailed out of the aircraft. The bomber eventually crashed at an unknown location in Canada and four years later the wreckage was found and searched, but no bomb was found. The weapon was briefly thought to have been located by a civilian diver in 2016 near Pitt Island but this was subsequently found not to be the case.[5]
A USAF B-36 bomber, AF Ser. No. 44-92075, was flying a simulated combat mission from Eielson Air Force Base, near Fairbanks, Alaska, to Carswell Air Force Base in Fort Worth, Texas, carrying one weapon containing a dummy warhead. The warhead contained conventional explosives and natural uranium but lacked the plutonium core of an actual weapon. After six hours of flight, the bomber experienced mechanical problems and was forced to shut down three of its six engines at an altitude of 12,000 feet (3,700 m). Fearing that severe weather and icing would jeopardize a safe emergency landing, the weapon was jettisoned over the Pacific Ocean from a height of 8,000 ft (2,400 m). The weapon's high explosives detonated upon impact with a bright flash visible. All of the sixteen crew members and one passenger were able to parachute from the plane and twelve were subsequently rescued from Princess Royal Island.[6]
April 11, 1950 – Albuquerque, New Mexico, US – Loss and recovery of nuclear materials
Three minutes after departure from Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque a USAF B-29 bomber carrying a nuclear weapon, four spare detonators, and a crew of thirteen crashed into a mountain near Manzano Base. The crash resulted in a fire that The New York Times reported as being visible from 15 miles (24 km). The bomb's casing was demolished and its high explosives ignited upon contact with the plane's burning fuel. However, according to the Department of Defense, the four spare detonators and all nuclear components were recovered. A nuclear detonation was not possible because, while on board, the weapon's core was not in the weapon for safety reasons. All thirteen crew members died.[6]
July 13, 1950 – Lebanon, Ohio, US – Non-nuclear detonation of an atomic bomb
A USAF B-50 aircraft on a training mission from Biggs Air Force Base with a nuclear weapon flew into the ground resulting in a high-explosive detonation, but no nuclear explosion.[7]
August 5, 1950 – Fairfield-Suisun AFB, California, US – Non-nuclear detonation of an atomic bomb
A USAF B-29 bomber AF Ser. No. 44-87651 with a Mark 4 nuclear bomb on board, flying to Guam experienced malfunctions with two propellers and with landing gear retraction during take-off and crashed while attempting an emergency landing at Fairfield Suisun-AFB. In the resulting fire, the bomb's high-explosive material exploded, killing nineteen people from the crew and rescue personnel. Brigadier General Robert F. Travis, command pilot of the bomber, was among the dead.[8]

jesk
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by jesk » 04 Sep 2018 06:18

November 10, 1950 – Rivière-du-Loup, Québec, Canada – Non-nuclear detonation of an atomic bomb
Returning one of several U.S. Mark 4 nuclear bombs secretly deployed in Canada, a USAF B-50 had engine trouble and jettisoned the weapon at 10,500 feet (3,200 m). The crew set the bomb to self-destruct at 2,500 ft (760 m) and dropped over the St. Lawrence River. The explosion shook area residents and scattered nearly 100 pounds (45 kg) of uranium (U-238) used in the weapon's tamper. The plutonium core was not in the bomb at the time.[9]
March 1, 1954 – Bikini Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (then Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands) – Nuclear test accident
During the Castle Bravo test of the first deployable hydrogen bomb, a miscalculation resulted in the explosion being over twice as large as predicted, with a total explosive force of 15 megatons of TNT (63 PJ). Of the total yield, 10 Mt (42 PJ) were from fission of the natural uranium tamper, but those fission reactions were quite dirty, producing a large amount of fallout. Combined with the much larger than expected yield and an unanticipated wind shift, radioactive fallout spread into unexpected areas. A Japanese fishing boat, the Daigo Fukuryu Maru/Lucky Dragon, came into contact with the fallout, which caused many of the crew to become ill, with one fatality. The fallout spread eastward onto the inhabited Rongelap and Rongerik Atolls. These islands were not evacuated before the explosion due to the unanticipated fallout zone and the financial cost involved, but many of the Marshall Islands natives have since suffered from radiation burns and radioactive dusting and also similar fates as the Japanese fishermen and have received little, if any, compensation from the federal government.[10] The test resulted in an international uproar and reignited Japanese concerns about radiation, especially with regard to the possible contamination of fish. Personal accounts of the Rongelap people can be seen in the documentary Children of Armageddon.
November 29, 1955 – Idaho, US – Partial meltdown
Operator error led to a partial core meltdown in the experimental EBR-I breeder reactor, resulting in temporarily elevated radioactivity levels in the reactor building and necessitating significant repair.[11][12]
March 10, 1956 – Over the Mediterranean Sea – Nuclear weapons lost
A USAF B-47 Stratojet, AF Ser. No. 52-534, on a non-stop mission from MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to an overseas base descended into a cloud formation at 14,000 feet over the Mediterranean in preparation for an in-air refueling and vanished while carrying two nuclear weapon cores. The plane was lost while flying through dense clouds, and the cores and other wreckage were never located.[13][14][15]
July 27, 1956 – RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, UK – Nuclear weapons damaged
A USAF B-47 crashed into a storage igloo spreading burning fuel over three Mark 6 nuclear bombs at RAF Lakenheath. A bomb disposal expert stated it was a miracle exposed detonators on one bomb did not fire, which presumably would have released nuclear material into the environment.[16]
May 22, 1957 – Kirtland AFB in New Mexico, US – Non-nuclear detonation of a Mark 17 thermonuclear bomb[17]
A B-36 ferrying a nuclear weapon from Biggs AFB to Kirtland AFB dropped a nuclear weapon on approach to Kirtland. The weapon struck the ground 4.5 miles south of the Kirtland control tower and 0.3 miles west of the Sandia Base reservation. The weapon was completely destroyed by the detonation of its high explosive material, creating a crater 12 feet (3.7 m) deep and 25 feet (7.62 m) in diameter. Radioactive contamination at the crater lip amounted to 0.5 milliroentgen.[15]
July 28, 1957 – Atlantic Ocean – Two weapons jettisoned and not recovered
A USAF C-124 aircraft from Dover Air Force Base, Delaware was carrying three nuclear bombs over the Atlantic Ocean when it experienced a loss of power. For their own safety, the crew jettisoned two nuclear bombs, which were never recovered.[7]
September 11, 1957 – Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, US – Fire, release of nuclear materials
A fire began in a theoretically fireproof area inside the plutonium processing building, in a glovebox used to handle radioactive materials, igniting the combustible rubber gloves and plexiglas windows of the box. The fire quickly spread to the plutonium as various safety features failed. The fire spread through the ventilation system as the containment ability of the facility became compromised, with plumes of radioactive smoke sent high into the outside air. The fire raged inside the building for 13 hours over the night of the 11th & 12th before firefighters could finally extinguish it. In the aftermath, Department of Energy officials, and the Dow Chemical officials who ran the facility, did not admit the extent of the catastrophe, or the radiation danger, to local officials or the media. Knowledge of the extent of the damage and contamination was kept from the public for years. After the fire, plutonium was detected near a school 12 miles (19 km) away and around Denver 17 miles (27 km) away. An independent group of scientists conducting off-site testing 13 years later found plutonium contamination in areas in nearby Rocky Flats to be 400 to 1,500 times higher than normal, higher than any ever recorded near any urban area, including Nagasaki. The Atomic Energy Commission then conducted its own off-site study, and that study confirmed plutonium contamination as far as 30 miles (48 km) from the plant.[18][19][20][21]
September 29, 1957 – Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Russian Federation (then Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, USSR) – Explosion, release of nuclear materials
See Kyshtym disaster. A cooling system failure at the Mayak nuclear processing plant resulted in a major explosion and release of radioactive materials. A large area was subjected to radioactive contamination and thousands of local inhabitants were evacuated.[22]
October 8–12, 1957 – Sellafield, Cumbria, UK – Reactor core fire
See Windscale fire. Technicians mistakenly overheated Windscale Pile No. 1 during an annealing process to release Wigner energy from graphite portions of the reactor. Poorly placed temperature sensors indicated the reactor was cooling rather than heating. The excess heat led to the failure of a nuclear cartridge, which in turn allowed uranium and irradiated graphite to react with air. The resulting fire burned for days, damaging a significant portion of the reactor core. About 150 burning fuel cells could not be lifted from the core, but operators succeeded in creating a firebreak by removing nearby fuel cells. An effort to cool the graphite core with water eventually quenched the fire. The reactor had released radioactive gases into the surrounding countryside, primarily in the form of iodine-131 (131I). Milk distribution was banned in a 200-square-mile (520 km2) area around the reactor for several weeks. A 1987 report by the National Radiological Protection Board predicted the accident would cause as many as 33 long-term cancer deaths, although the Medical Research Council Committee concluded that "it is in the highest degree unlikely that any harm has been done to the health of anybody, whether a worker in the Windscale plant or a member of the general public." The reactor that burned was one of two air-cooled, graphite-moderated natural uranium reactors at the site used for production of plutonium.[23][24][25]
October 11, 1957 – Homestead Air Force Base, Florida – Nuclear bomb burned after B-47 aircraft accident[26]
B-47 aircraft crashed during take-off after a wheel exploded; one nuclear bomb burned in the resulting fire.
January 31, 1958 – Morocco – Nuclear bomb damaged in crash[26]
During a simulated takeoff, a wheel casting failure caused the tail of a USAF B-47 carrying an armed nuclear weapon to hit the runway, rupturing a fuel tank and sparking a fire. Some contamination was detected immediately following the accident.[27][28]
February 5, 1958 – Savannah, Georgia, US – Nuclear bomb lost
See 1958 Tybee Island mid-air collision. A USAF B-47 bomber jettisoned a Mark 15 Mod 0 nuclear bomb over the Atlantic Ocean after a midair collision with a USAF F-86 Sabre during a simulated combat mission from Homestead Air Force Base, Florida. The F-86's pilot ejected and parachuted to safety.[29] The USAF claimed the B-47 tried landing at Hunter Air Force Base, Georgia three times before the bomb was jettisoned at 7,200 ft (2,200 m) near Tybee Island, Georgia. The B-47 pilot successfully landed in one attempt only after he first jettisoned the bomb. A 3-square-mile (7.8 km2) area near Wassaw Sound was searched for nine weeks before the search was called off.
March 11, 1958 – 1958 Mars Bluff B-47 nuclear weapon loss incident, US – Non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear bomb
A USAF B-47E bomber, number 53-1876A, was flying from Hunter Air Force Base in Savannah, Georgia, to England in a formation of four B-47s on a top-secret mission called Operation Snow Flurry to perform a mock bombing exercise. The flight navigator/bombardier was checking the locking harness on the massive (7,600 pounds (3,447 kg)) Mark 6 nuclear bomb when he accidentally pushed the emergency release lever. The bomb fell on the bomb-bay doors, smashing them open and going into a 15,000 feet (4,572 m) free fall. The high-explosive detonator went off after it hit the ground 6.5 miles east of Florence, South Carolina, in Mars Bluff, creating a 70 feet (21 m) wide crater, 30 feet (9 m) deep.[30] A nearby house was destroyed and several people were injured.[29]:136–137[31] A nuclear detonation was not possible because, while on board, the weapon's core was not in the weapon for safety reasons.
June 16, 1958 – Oak Ridge, Tennessee, US – Accidental criticality
A supercritical portion of highly enriched uranyl nitrate was allowed to collect in the drum causing a prompt neutron criticality in the C-1 wing of building 9212 at the Y-12 complex. It is estimated that the reaction produced 1.3 × 1018 fissions. Eight employees were in close proximity to the drum during the accident, receiving neutron doses ranging from 30 to 477 rems. No fatalities were reported.[32]
November 4, 1958 – Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, US – Non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear bomb
A USAF B-47 bomber developed a fire shortly after take-off and went down with a nuclear weapon on board from an altitude of 1,500 ft (460 m). The detonation of the high explosive material in the bomb created a crater 6 feet (1.8 m) deep and 35 feet (10.7 m) in diameter. Three crew members escaped, and one was killed.[33]
November 26, 1958 – Chennault Air Force Base, Louisiana, US – Non-nuclear detonation of a nuclear bomb
A USAF B-47 bomber with a nuclear weapon on board developed a fire while on the ground. The aircraft wreckage and the site of the accident were contaminated after a limited explosion of non-nuclear material.[34]
December 30, 1958 – Los Alamos, New Mexico, US – Accidental criticality
During chemical purification, a critical mass of a plutonium solution was accidentally assembled at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A chemical operator named Cecil E. Kelley died of acute radiation sickness. The March 1961 Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine printed a special supplement medically analyzing this accident. Hand manipulation of critical assemblies was abandoned as a matter of policy in U.S. federal facilities after this accident.[32]
January 18, 1959 – classified USAF air base somewhere in the Pacific – Nuclear weapon on fire
A parked USAF F-100C Super Sabre, loaded with a nuclear weapon, developed a fire on one of the USAF Pacific bases after its external fuel tanks were dropped and exploded during a practice alert. The resulting fire was put out in seven minutes and there was no nuclear weapon explosion.[35]
July 6, 1959, – Barksdale AFB, Louisiana, US – Limited contamination
A USAF C-124 transporting two nuclear weapons without fissile cores crashed and burned down during take-off. The high explosive detonators did not go off. The wreckage area experienced limited contamination.[36]
September 25, 1959, – Off Whidbey Island, Washington, US – Lost nuclear weapon
A U.S. Navy P5M antisubmarine aircraft with an unarmed nuclear depth charge on board crash-landed into Puget Sound near Whidbey Island, Washington. The nuclear weapon was not recovered.[37]
October 15, 1959, – Hardinsburg, Kentucky, US – Nuclear weapon partially damaged
After both planes took off from Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, a USAF B-52F-100-BO (No. 57-036), with two nuclear weapons collided at 32,000 feet (9,754 m) with a KC-135 refueling aircraft (No. 57-1513), during a refueling procedure near Hardinsburg, Kentucky. Both planes crashed killing eight crew members. One unarmed nuclear weapon was partially damaged, but no contamination resulted.[38]
November 20, 1959 – Oak Ridge, Tennessee, US – Explosion
A chemical explosion occurred during decontamination of processing machinery in the radiochemical processing plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee . (Report ORNL-2989, Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The accident resulted in the release of about 15 grams (0.53 oz) of 239Pu.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_m ... _accidents

And these are only known cases in the 1950s. In the USSR information was classified.

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Ironmachine
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by Ironmachine » 04 Sep 2018 07:26

jesk wrote:The well-known Russian writer Zinoviev once said: irony is the defense of a weak mind from the incomprehensible.
Then you should be using irony all the time.
jesk wrote:Why prove physics? You get confused in a theoretical study.
If by "you" you mean yourself then sure, theoretical studies would confuse you. But don't worry, you can always do as the author of your first link, give up trying to understand nuclear physics and just make up your own conspiracy theory... Wait, that's exactly what you do in all your threads here.
jesk wrote:And why did not nuclear weapons be used after Japan? At least once..
Do you really need to ask?
jesk wrote:
OpanaPointer wrote:You have peer-reviewed papers that explain that, right?
there are many

https://www.big-lies.org/nuke-lies/www. ... nuked.html
Do you really don't know what a peer-reviewed paper is?

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Ironmachine
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by Ironmachine » 04 Sep 2018 07:53

jesk wrote:And why did not nuclear weapons be used after Japan? At least once..
Try at least to keep the internal consistency of your arguments. If you keep on saying that the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were a fake, and that every nuclear test executed is also a cover up, how would an alleged third bomb used in combat change your mind?

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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by South » 04 Sep 2018 12:01

Good morning Jest,

Do you really believe Soviet information in the 1950s was classified and US information was not ?

Must look up "Hunter". Was it an AFB or Hunter Army Air Field or part of nearby Naval Air Station Glenco (now a major law enforcement training academy).


~ Bob
eastern Virginia, USA

OpanaPointer
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by OpanaPointer » 04 Sep 2018 12:26

Ironmachine wrote:
04 Sep 2018 07:53
jesk wrote:And why did not nuclear weapons be used after Japan? At least once..
Try at least to keep the internal consistency of your arguments. If you keep on saying that the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were a fake, and that every nuclear test executed is also a cover up, how would an alleged third bomb used in combat change your mind?
He's asserting, without evidence, that we claimed to have nuked Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the "fact" that we haven't used them since proves they don't work, ever. As he resolutely ignores evidence he doesn't like it's pointless to rebutt anything he says.
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OpanaPointer
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Re: Nukes do not exist

Post by OpanaPointer » 04 Sep 2018 13:17

jesk, if you want approval for your ideas try visiting abovetopsecret.com. It's nonsense-friendly.
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RE: Nukes Do Not Exist - (Aesop's Fables Continued).

Post by Robert Rojas » 04 Sep 2018 13:28

Greetings to both brother South and the community as a whole. Howdy Bob! Well sir, in respect to your posting of Tuesday - September 04, 2018 - 3:01am, old yours truly must duly concede that I was only aware of a fraction of the disasters that were noted by citizen Jesk on Monday - September 03, 2018 - 9:17pm and Monday - September 03, 2018 - 9:18pm. Given both the era and age of these now distant catastrophes, I must conclude (rightly OR wrongly) that Jesk obtained his declassified information from under the guise of either the FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT or a myriad of other freely accessible sources available to the public at large. It certainly was quite an eye opener to learn about ordnance that went missing before I was even born! Now, in terms of the Rodina, both you and I know that those oafish cretins would literally stamp ANYTHING as a STATE SECRET including the scores of football games. Are we having fun yet? In any case, citizen Jesk's two respective postings did make for interesting reading at zero dark thirty in the morning! Finally, was GOOD MORNING JEST an early morning TYPO? Apparatchiks are not generally known for their sense of humor. JUST SAYING! Well, that's my latest two Yankee cents worth on this meandering exercise into the surreal - for now anyway. As always, I would like to bid you an especially copacetic day over in the Old Dominion that is the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Best Regards,
Uncle Bob :idea: :|
"It is well that war is so terrible, or we should grow too fond of it" - Robert E. Lee

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