Korean War

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South
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Korean War

Post by South » 15 Apr 2019 12:55

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/ ... iers-52237


Good morning all,

Per ...

Please disregard the intro...it's current events... and the later discussion of contemporary US bunker bombs.

There were, indeed, public policy disputes between MacArthur and Truman but I believe "the icing on the cake" - the spark that cause Mac to get fired was the actual MacArthur press releases from his HQ refuting US national policy from the White House.

Article mentions No Gun Ri and Pohang.


~ Bob

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henryk
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Re: Korean War

Post by henryk » 15 Apr 2019 21:47

The key factor was the entry of Communist China into the war, due to MacArthur's policies..
https://www.history.com/this-day-in-his ... s-in-korea
1951
President Truman relieves General MacArthur of duties in Korea

n perhaps the most famous civilian-military confrontation in the history of the United States, President Harry S. Truman relieves General Douglas MacArthur of command of the U.S. forces in Korea. The firing of MacArthur set off a brief uproar among the American public, but Truman remained committed to keeping the conflict in Korea a “limited war.”

Problems with the flamboyant and egotistical General MacArthur had been brewing for months. In the early days of the war in Korea (which began in June 1950), the general had devised some brilliant strategies and military maneuvers that helped save South Korea from falling to the invading forces of communist North Korea. As U.S. and United Nations forces turned the tide of battle in Korea, MacArthur argued for a policy of pushing into North Korea to completely defeat the communist forces. Truman went along with this plan, but worried that the communist government of the People’s Republic of China might take the invasion as a hostile act and intervene in the conflict. In October 1950, MacArthur met with Truman and assured him that the chances of a Chinese intervention were slim. Then, in November and December 1950, hundreds of thousands of Chinese troops crossed into North Korea and flung themselves against the American lines, driving the U.S. troops back into South Korea. MacArthur then asked for permission to bomb communist China and use Nationalist Chinese forces from Taiwan against the People’s Republic of China. Truman flatly refused these requests and a very public argument began to develop between the two men.

In April 1951, President Truman fired MacArthur and replaced him with Gen. Matthew Ridgeway. On April 11, Truman addressed the nation and explained his actions. He began by defending his overall policy in Korea, declaring, “It is right for us to be in Korea.” He excoriated the “communists in the Kremlin [who] are engaged in a monstrous conspiracy to stamp out freedom all over the world.” Nevertheless, he explained, it “would be wrong—tragically wrong—for us to take the initiative in extending the war… Our aim is to avoid the spread of the conflict.” The president continued, “I believe that we must try to limit the war to Korea for these vital reasons: To make sure that the precious lives of our fighting men are not wasted; to see that the security of our country and the free world is not needlessly jeopardized; and to prevent a third world war.” General MacArthur had been fired “so that there would be no doubt or confusion as to the real purpose and aim of our policy.”

MacArthur returned to the United States to a hero’s welcome. Parades were held in his honor, and he was asked to speak before Congress (where he gave his famous “Old soldiers never die, they just fade away” speech). Public opinion was strongly against Truman’s actions, but the president stuck to his decision without regret or apology. Eventually, MacArthur did “just fade away,” and the American people began to understand that his policies and recommendations might have led to a massively expanded war in Asia. Though the concept of a “limited war,” as opposed to the traditional American policy of unconditional victory, was new and initially unsettling to many Americans, the idea came to define the U.S. Cold War military strategy.

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Re: Korean War

Post by OpanaPointer » 15 Apr 2019 22:09

Not the first time the American Shogun chose to be the arbiter of US policy. (From memory) "I have come here with the purpose AS I UNDERSTAND IT of returning to the Philippines." Nobody told him that. Whether or not the US would return to the Philippines or bypass them was not decided by the people with the authority to make that decision.
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Re: Korean War

Post by South » 16 Apr 2019 03:25

Good morning Henryk,

Yet, even if China's volunteers did not participate in the war, MacArthur's press releases in direct refutation of Truman's White House publicly-proclaimed policy positions displayed a major - a major - domestic US political confrontation.

MacArthur's position in both popular US and world history is a famous general. Neglected is that he was also a politician. His father failed in politics like son Doug. Their "redemption" arrived with elected Republican Dwight Eisenhower, another famous general.


~ Bob

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Re: Korean War

Post by OpanaPointer » 17 Apr 2019 12:01

When MacArthur arrived in Pearl Harbor to discuss the further course of the Pacific war with FDR and Nimitz his staff had to be ordered to take off their "MacArthur for President" buttons before they arrived. Major purity test, those buttons, but they also revealed his post war plans.
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