Right hand salute?

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RachelF.
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Right hand salute?

Post by RachelF. » 25 Aug 2003 20:52

Most of us know that the right hand salute was given in salutations to fellow Third Reich members, but I want to know why. Where did the idea of this greeting come from? When was it first used? I now Mussolini’s fascist troops gave similar salutes, but I’m not sure there is a connection.
Also, is there a specific reason why the Nazis only wore their Swastika armbands on the left side?
Thank you!

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K.Kocjancic
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Post by K.Kocjancic » 25 Aug 2003 21:02

This salute comes from Roman salute "Ave".

Mussolini and his fascist troops considered themselves as a successors of Great Roman Empire, soo them copied the salute from Roman Empire.

Hitler admired Mussolini's Fascist Republic and copied some things from him.

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_The_General_
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Post by _The_General_ » 25 Aug 2003 21:02

hi,

some things about the swastika in history:

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A swastika labyrinth used for meditation in the Tantric sect of Hinduism. In Indian thought, the labyrinth represents Maya, the goddess of desire and illusion, who conceals the sacred centre occupied by the god Shiva.

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The word 'labyrinth' comes directly from the ancient Minoan civilisation of Crete, and the swastika was used by the Minoans as a symbol of the labyrinth. (Tetradrachm from Knossos, Crete, 1st millenium BC.)

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The swastika has been synonymous with the labyrinth for thousands of years. This labyrinth-shaped swastika seal was excavated from the ruins of the ancient Indian city of Harappa (2nd millenium BC).

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The images of spiral, labyrinth and swastika are fused together in this ancient Viking painting. (Gotland stone, Vallstena, Sweden 5th century BC).

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Aufklarung
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Post by Aufklarung » 26 Aug 2003 02:14

Very nice. Thanx for that, General. :D

regards
A :)

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Helly Angel
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Post by Helly Angel » 26 Aug 2003 03:38

Yes, with the salute Kocjo is OK.

The use of the armband was born the weekend of October 14, 1922 in the march of Coburg when they used this piece like ID because they assisted to the German Day and they were 800 nazi members.

The city was very very dangerous because it was a feud comunist until this date. They has many street battles in the night and several injuries between the militance. They used the armband to ID their wounded members and rescuet them.

The brown shirt is for this cause.

Hitler in "Mein Kampf" make a reference about the "Spirit of Korps" between the militance when they used "uniform" in Coburg.

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Nazis in Coburg, October 1922

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Scott Smith
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Re: Right hand salute?

Post by Scott Smith » 26 Aug 2003 06:02

RachelF. wrote:Most of us know that the right hand salute was given in salutations to fellow Third Reich members, but I want to know why. Where did the idea of this greeting come from? When was it first used? I now Mussolini’s fascist troops gave similar salutes, but I’m not sure there is a connection.

The Italian Fascists were using it, whom Hitler admired because it was an anti-Communist soldier's revolution. The Fascists borrowed the salute from ancient Rome. The open sword hand indicates a peaceful greeting. The Germanic salute is similar except that instead of being extended outward the arm is raised to the visor as an armored knight would expose his face.

Also, is there a specific reason why the Nazis only wore their Swastika armbands on the left side?

The right arm is the sword arm and therefore the accessory arm is the left, so badges and armbands are therefore generally worn on the left (or Sinister) side.
:)

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Last edited by Scott Smith on 06 Sep 2003 22:41, edited 1 time in total.

Chris S
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Post by Chris S » 27 Aug 2003 20:54

The origins of more normal and formal saluting as we know it came from knights of old raising their visors to each other on meeting to show they were friends.

They used their right arms as that being the sword arm.

A left handed salute is an insult and shows the right arm ready for use

Chris S

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zerzus
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Post by zerzus » 31 Aug 2003 16:18

the swastika is not only known as a labyrinth, but also as a form of the sun cross. you get an swastika when you cut the lines.

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John Doe
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Post by John Doe » 31 Aug 2003 19:29

Another thread about the Swastika http://www.thirdreichforum.com/viewtopi ... t=swastika

Also in the Spanish fascist they used too. Here´s a photo of Francisco Franco.

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Regards, Javier

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Alfred Naujocks
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Post by Alfred Naujocks » 31 Aug 2003 22:57

I read (somewhere, a long time ago) that the swastika was designed as the basis of an ancient fortress. Each wing mutually defending the other. If an enemy aproached within the wings they could be assailed from three sides.
Don't know if it's true, but it does seem elegant.

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Vance Pollock
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American stiff arm salute

Post by Vance Pollock » 02 Sep 2003 01:21

The US used a stiff arm salute during the Pledge of Allegiance for a time. The only difference was the palm was turned upwards. There are plenty of photos of this... but the first time it jumped out at me was as I scanned some issues of Life magazine from the 1930s... I saw a group of young people in a gym giving this American salute and was confused for a moment.

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Jeremy Chan
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Post by Jeremy Chan » 06 Sep 2003 11:30

On the topic of salutes, is the traditional German Army salute done British style (palm facing outwards) or the 'American' style (palm facing downwards)? I've seen them using both. I'm not so sure about the different styles of salutes.
I'm aware that some or most European armies use a unique salute with the thumb, third & fourth finger tucked in, palm facing outwards, espqacially the Italians and Poles. Do the Japanese use that salute too? I'm also curious about the salute the Russians use. Aside from that, I'm unaware as to what other countries use the 'American' palm-down style salute. I'm thinking China, Taiwan and Russia?
RE the stiff arm "American" salute. That's actually used on swearing various oaths, done with the arm fixed in an L-shape, palm facing flat forward, forearm parallel to the body.
I've found in many sources the swastika was used in many ancient and medieval societies long before the NSDAP adopted it. The term swastika actually comes from the Hindu, meaning 'victory' (or derived from the Sanskrit; 'su' and 'asti', can't remember the meaning). In it's Indian form it was set square, flipped back-to-front from it's 'Nazi' form, and had a dot between each arm, each standing for victory, respect and 2 others (forgot).
Anyway, the Nazi movement copied their swastika from a Christian political party, then flipped it back to front, and on its corner to symbolise movement. Strange how a symbol representing peace and respect can be seen by many today as a sign of 'evil'.

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Aufklarung
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Post by Aufklarung » 06 Sep 2003 15:09

Col
Ref your req on other countries that use the "Palm Down Salute", please note that the Cdn Military, to which I have belonged for the last 19 yrs, uses said salute. Right arm come directly to brow, above right eye. Upper arm is parallel to ground, forearm at a 45 degree angle. Hand is in line with forearm with index finger tip not quite touching brow. Hold salute for a two count and cut away straight down. Of course there are variations used by individual soldiers WRT style and flashiness. REMFs, PONTIs and officers are usually the ones that do not do it as per regs!! :wink:
Back in the day we did use the Brit style salute but that was discarded in the middle 1960's after unification of the separate branches into the Canadian Armed Forces.
I hope this is helpful to you.

regards
A :)

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Nagelfar
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Post by Nagelfar » 06 Sep 2003 21:47

Vidkun Quisling also used the 'right arm' extended salute, saying it was an 'ancient Viking salute'. at first such excessive 'borrowing' from Romans by Italians, from Italians by Germans, and from Germans by Norwegians seems obvious and the reasons given by the regimes absurd propaganda. but in actual truth this salute very may well be an ancient Indo-European style salute, used by ancient Germanic warriors, Celts, Greco-Romanics, Slavs & Indians, and used loosely among all people of that lingo-cultural group (especially in more militaristic times throughout the ages). the 'hand to face' salutes are all more recent innovations from the feudal ages, but the 'extended arm' salute seems to be more ancient.

the use of the 'right' instead of 'left' goes back in Indo-European culture quite away's as well. the very word "right" has had the meaning of "correct" or "well, proper" from the beginning's of it's etymology, whereas the word 'left' (or in Old English, 'Lyft') has meant "weak" or "broken", (e.g. leftovers. left-behind, etc). in many Indo-European cultures there is some equivalent, in latin the word for 'right' is "dexter", but the word for 'left' is "sinister", which is a modern loan word having the meaning of 'nefarious' or 'evil'... it might have something to do with how the mind works, that 'left' developed negative connotations, the left & right sides of the brain, which function on their respective opposite sides of the body, serve different human fuctions. recent studies have shown that a disproportionate amount of mentally handicapped people are left-handed, whether this is due to simply being less influenced by common standards while learning to adapt or is actually a result of certain mental disabilities is not entirely known.

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Post by nondescript handle » 06 Sep 2003 22:17

Colonel SteelFist wrote:On the topic of salutes, is the traditional German Army salute done British style (palm facing outwards) or the 'American' style (palm facing downwards)? I've seen them using both. I'm not so sure about the different styles of salutes.


The traditional German salute is the "American" style, here the modern day Bundeswehr version:
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"British" style salutes in the German army are most likely just sloppy implementations.
But July 20, 1944 the Wehrmacht abolished the traditional military salute in favor of the Hitler-salute.

Regards
Mark

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