Most Heroic Last Stand Ever

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 27 Jul 2005 07:47

I would suggest the following last stands:

-Captain Dyer and the Company 'A', 1/Cheshire, of the 15th Brigade, Audregnies, 24 August 1914

- the defense of the Nimy bridge at Mons, 23 August, 1914 by First Lieutenant Dease and Private S.F. Godley, 4/Royal Fusilers: the Royal Fusiliers were ordered to hold two bridges over the Mons-Conde Canal while the rest of the British army retreated to the Marne. The Royal Fusiliers only had two machine-guns against six divisions of the German army. The Germans directed their fire at the two machine-gunners as they knew these men had to be killed before they could advance over the bridges. As soon as a machine-gunner was killed, another soldier moved forward to carry out the task. Eventually, the commanding officer, Lt. Steele, decided that his men would have to retreat. Before they left, he asked for two volunteers to man the machine-guns. Godley and Dease offered to do what appeared to be a suicidal task. Godley had to remove three bodies before he could get to his machine-gun. Within a few minutes of taking over the gun, Dease was killed. A shell exploded by the side of Godley and a piece of shrapnel entered his back. Although in terrible pain he continued firing at the Germans trying to cross the bridge. A bullet hit him in the head and lodged in his skull. Godley's single-handed defence of the bridge for two hours gave the men enough time to retreat. Godley was eventually captured by Germans soldiers and taken to a German field hospital where surgeons removed bullets from his head and back.

- the last stand of the 2/Royal Munster Fusiliers led my Maj. Paul Alfred Charrey plus some elements of the 15th (The King's) Hussars and two guns from the 118 battery of the RFA at Etreux: On the 27th August, 1914, Etreux was the scene of the Rearguard Affair, in which the 2nd Royal Munster Fusiliers were overwhelmed, after a long resistance, by nine German battalions

Ziemowit
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Post by Ziemowit » 27 Jul 2005 08:17

KalaVelka wrote:
182 Polish soldiers against 3,500 Nazi's
Were all German soldiers in this incident nazis? Please back up your statement.

/Kasper
According to my sources, if they were not Nazi's then they were on the Nazi's side. They fought for the Germans, they fought under the nazi swastika flag, so Im quite confident with my previous statement... 182 Polish soldiers against 3,500 Nazi's.

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 27 Jul 2005 08:22

Ziemowit wrote:According to my sources, if they were not Nazi's then they were on the Nazi's side. They fought for the Germans, they fought under the nazi swastika flag, so Im quite confident with my previous statement... 182 Polish soldiers against 3,500 Nazi's.
I think that this is a gross simplification of history, but, anyway...

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 27 Jul 2005 08:26

The defense of Wake. Around 500 US men -soldiers and pilots- with 12 figthers Wildcat against superior Japanese forces. They fought during two weeks, sunk 9 Japanese ships, shot down 21 ebemy planes, defeated a Japanese landings and fought until the last bullet.

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DXTR
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Post by DXTR » 19 Aug 2005 14:38

how about that group of colonial marines on LV-426? - now that a last stand! eventhough Lt. Gorman blew it. :D

anyway I would still say that group of soviet soldiers holding out in the grain elevator at stalingrad are candidates to the title:

'our battalion, plus tanks, is attacking the grain elevator from which smoke is pouring -- the grain in it is burning, the russians seem to have set light to it themselves. Barbarism. The battaqlion is suffering heavy losses, there are not more than 60 men left in each company. The elevator is occupied not by men but by devils that no flames or bullets can destroy'

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KalaVelka
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Post by KalaVelka » 05 Nov 2005 12:51

Ziemowit wrote:
KalaVelka wrote:
182 Polish soldiers against 3,500 Nazi's
Were all German soldiers in this incident nazis? Please back up your statement.

/Kasper
According to my sources, if they were not Nazi's then they were on the Nazi's side. They fought for the Germans, they fought under the nazi swastika flag, so Im quite confident with my previous statement... 182 Polish soldiers against 3,500 Nazi's.
Finland also cooperatived with the so called "nazi's". Does that make finnish soldiers also nazi ones? Have you interviewed every one of those 3,500 "nazi's" and asked about their political opinions?

Epaminondas
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Post by Epaminondas » 05 Nov 2005 20:46

Polynikes wrote:
David C. Clarke wrote:Come on guys, the 300 Spartans at Thermopylae!!!!!

Best Regards,
David
Hollywood has done a great dis-service to the 2,000 Thessilians who were also there.

Besides at Camerone, Little Big Horn, Alamo etc ...the defenders LOST!
Well, Thermopylae was was a strategic win- The greeks were uncertain they could stand against the Persians (which the battle showed they could); and it bought time for the fleet to shake itself down and skirmish agaisnt the Persians.

The Greeks lost the land battle- but the fleet got out with out any significant losses... if the Persians had taken the pass quickly, they might have been able to pin the fleet down and beat it [fleets during this period needed to go to shore frequently].

Just because you lose a battle, doesn't mean it doesn't have a larger operational or strategic influence out of proportion to the loss.

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Kurt_Steiner
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Post by Kurt_Steiner » 06 Nov 2005 08:30

The defense of Barcelona during the siege that went from May 1713 until 11th September 1714, having the Franco-Spanish army -80,000 men during the siege, 30,000 of whom participated in the assault of the 11th September-, against the defenders of Barcelona, 5,365 men, who fought 8 hours the massive assault until they had to surrender.
Last edited by Kurt_Steiner on 07 Nov 2005 10:42, edited 1 time in total.

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 07 Nov 2005 10:41

There have been a lot of famous last stands so far in the human history. But the heroic defense of the Adzhimushkay quarry in 1942 is on their top.

It's a miracle that 20,000~40,000 soldiers and civilains resisted in a small quarry for 6 months without any external assistance and fought to the end without any survivor(Some sources say there were 48 survivors). There's no other comparable case in the entire military history of the world.

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 88&start=0

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BrankoB.
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Post by BrankoB. » 10 Nov 2005 00:10

Thermopolye as the last stand, and Leonidas almost won. Well, he would have if Persians didn't discover an alternative passage to the coast. That's gotta be No. 1.

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Post by Polynikes » 24 Nov 2005 23:08

BrankoB. wrote:Thermopolye as the last stand, and Leonidas almost won. Well, he would have if Persians didn't discover an alternative passage to the coast. That's gotta be No. 1.
Hardly.

The Greeks were always going to lose that battle...it WAS heroic but it was doomed to failure.

Indeed the absolute certainty of defeat makes it slightly less heroic than other last stands. To be heroic, you need to have a chance of achieving something...and then achieve it. Otherwise it's an exercise in futility.

Salamis, not Thermopylae, was what turned the war.

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soldat_m56
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Post by soldat_m56 » 27 Nov 2005 04:15

The German garrison at Tsingtao in 1914. They held were fastly out numbered by the Japanese and the British but they fought until they ran out of ammunition. Afterwards they surrendered rather than rather than get killed. The lone German pilot in Tsingtao, Gunther Pluschow hand dropped bombs from his plane at Japanese ships and everyone knows how inaccurate and hopeless that would have been.

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Post by Smileshire » 27 Nov 2005 22:14

Thus on 2 September 1914, shortly after war was declared by the Japanese, Kamio's 18th Division of 23,000 men backed by 142 guns began a bombardment of the port. Britain, wary of Japanese intentions in the region, decided to send ONLY 1,500 troops to assist the Japanese (and to keep a watchful eye upon proceedings).

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 28 Nov 2005 04:14

Nick89 wrote:The lone German pilot in Tsingtao, Gunther Pluschow hand dropped bombs from his plane at Japanese ships and everyone knows how inaccurate and hopeless that would have been.
Lt. Gunter Plüschow born 1886 in Munich and died in Argentina in 1931.

http://www.deutsche-schutzgebiete.de/plueschow.htm

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Post by gewehrdork » 10 Dec 2005 08:30

And what of the "lost battalion" of the AEF in 1918 ?. Had the surrounded survivors not been relieved when they were they would most certainly have fought to the last man.
In reading this thread I too had thoughts of those russians in the grain elevator at stalingrad - glad to see someone posted that - they fought like dogs to the last !.
I am sure there were manystands on the ost front in WW2 were german units stood fast to the last that are forever lost to written history.
A dear friend and neighbor of mine was in the marine batt that was over run on okinawa - and the few fellows that survived with him were in a fight to the end - there was no doubt about that for the three plus days they fought off the japanese whilst surrounded the whole time.
No mention of the Bismarck - she fought to the very end with great loss to her crew ?.
What of the torpedo squadrons that flew to their near total annihilation at Midway fighting the japanese ?.
There were a couple notable firebases in the vietnam conflict that provide some real intense heroic last stands. As well some actions in Korea during the intial chinese onslaught.

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