Most Heroic Last Stand Ever

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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 10 Dec 2005 13:37

A heroic last stand from Korean war:

Turkish artillery Lieutenant Mehmet C. who was the commander of artillery observation company, tried to hold the hill where he was observing the enemy.The chinese forces attacked the hill with a great number of men.Lieutenant Mehmet and his company fought desperetaly till the final hour.Suddenly, the radioman of the battery HQ heard Lieutenant's voice on the radio, requesting artillery fire on given cordinates.Radioman was shocked because Lt.Mehmet was giving his own cordinates for artillery fire.He told the radioman that he and his friends didnt want be captured alive by the enemy and wanted to die by their own artillery fire.The battery commander accepted the request with tears in his eyes and requested all divisional batteries to open fire on the hill.
At once all the batteries opened fire.There were tears in the eyes of every soldier.Lt. Mehmet and his few remaining comrades passed to eternity.
The sad thing about this that not many people in Turkiye know about this story.

Regards

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 16 Dec 2005 14:25

Mehmet Fatih wrote:He told the radioman that he and his friends didnt want be captured alive by the enemy and wanted to die by their own artillery fire.
Where was their death site?

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 16 Dec 2005 14:28

I don't even the name of this guy. He was not a soldier, just an ordinary citizen. He was executed after some days later after this impressive and world famous one man stand.
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raymond101
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Most Heroic Last Stand Ever

Post by raymond101 » 16 Dec 2005 16:22

Thermopylae: According to Herodotus - all except the Thespians and the Thebans remained with the Spartans.

However - The Thebans were detained by Leonidas as hostages very much against their will; but the Thespians of their own accord refused to dessert Leonidas and his men, and stayed and died with them.

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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 16 Dec 2005 17:56

killchola wrote:
Mehmet Fatih wrote:He told the radioman that he and his friends didnt want be captured alive by the enemy and wanted to die by their own artillery fire.
Where was their death site?
I dont really know that killchola.
I read it in a book of Turkish Ministry of Education long years ago.

Regards
Fatih

dragos03
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Post by dragos03 » 16 Dec 2005 19:41

Great suggestion killchola. The unknown Chinese guy that stopped the tank column was certainly a very brave individual. And he didn't abandon his bags either. One of the few incidents that trurly illustrates the meaning of the syntagm "The power of one".

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 17 Dec 2005 01:43

dragos03 wrote:Great suggestion killchola. The unknown Chinese guy that stopped the tank column was certainly a very brave individual. And he didn't abandon his bags either. One of the few incidents that trurly illustrates the meaning of the syntagm "The power of one".
When I went on a trip to Beijing in October 2001, I tried to trace where this heroic last one man stand occurred. But, I couldn't find his vestige on the street where he confronted a column of tanks 12 years ago. The streets were full of people celebrating China's National Day with hundreds of policemen standing on guard all along the street.

Might we say that all these heros in our history fought to the end only to be buried in oblivion? Maybe the unknown Chinese guy disappeared into the cold sky of Beijing in that summer day.....

Karl
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Post by Karl » 17 Dec 2005 02:16

This was the end of political innocence for many, I think.

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Kim Sung
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One Man vs One Tank Corps!!!!!

Post by Kim Sung » 13 Jan 2006 04:09

Today, I've found a photo showing that the unknown Chinese hero above stood against, at least, one tank corps!!!!! :o :o :o :o :o Not just four tanks! Even more tanks than we had known so far!!!!!
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dragos03
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Post by dragos03 » 13 Jan 2006 17:49

Time Magazine's profile of the unknown hero is right: there are two heroes in this story.

"As one of the pro-democracy movement's leaders said, the heroes of the tank picture are two: the unknown figure who risked his life by standing in front of the juggernaut and the driver who rose to the moral challenge by refusing to mow down his compatriot."

http://www.time.com/time/time100/leader ... rebel.html

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 14 Jan 2006 01:43

As soon as the man had descended from the tank, anxious onlookers pulled him to safety, and the waters of anonymity closed around him once more. Some people said he was called Wang Weilin, was 19 years old and a student; others said not even that much could be confirmed. Some said he was a factory worker's son, others that he looked like a provincial just arrived in the capital by train. When American newsmen asked Chinese leader Jiang Zemin a year later what had happened to the symbol of Chinese freedom — caught by foreign cameramen and broadcast around the world — he replied, not very ringingly, "I think never killed."
Thank you for the link. I think he was executed but not dead. He is still living in our heart. Wang Weilin or whoever he is, some day in the futurte, more incarnations of him will sprout in all over the world and they will raise up the banner and justice for which he stood up against the long column of tanks. I'm sure.
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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 12 Feb 2006 14:03

I believe the brave student is still alive. Why? ......!

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alf
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Post by alf » 13 Feb 2006 08:32

I agree totally about that unknown Chinese man, thats true courage, no blood lust, bands or dreams of glory. He made a stand.

I've read through and see lots of examples of last stands. In Australia there is Sherlock and his 100 men at Wau in 1943, a forgotten last stand particularily by Australians :P

How about some Naval Ones? Just to vary things

HMS Glowworm April 1940, a Britsh Destroyer that fought its way through the Admiral Hipper's Destroyer Screen and eventually rammed the Hipper? The first VC awarded in the Royal Navy on the recommendation of the enemy. http://www.hmsglowworm.org.uk/

Image

The Armed Merchant Cruiser Jervis Bay placing itself between a convoy and the Admiral Scheer ( under Lutjens later of the Bismark). It's sacrifice meant the vast majority of the convoy escaped. And to prove the true meaning of democracy, a swedish ship in the convoy, took a vote and then returned back to rescue the few survivors of the Jervis Bay.

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Going back a few centuries The Revenge and Richard Grenville, supposedly one small English ship against 53 Spanish Men of War, but no more than 7 Spanish ships attacked :)
God of battles, was ever a battle like this in the world before?

Lawrence of the USS Chesapeake with his "Don't give the Ship" cry. But since the battle was by inviataion and was essentially a duel between ships ( HMS Shannon and USS Chesapeake) it is hard to call it a last stand. But Lawrence was brave, but bravery isnt enough.

As to the Spartans lol after watching that "film" Alexander the Great, its obvious where the phrase, "backs to walls" orginated from ( The Persians btw :P )

alf
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Post by alf » 13 Feb 2006 09:11

Just as an afterthought. A good book is The Kaisers Battle by Martin Middlebrook. Its on the March Offensive by Germany in 1918 but in the appendices Martin Middlebrook discusses "last stands" in detail.

They usually have a few things in common, (i) your side is losing, (2) you need to inspire your remaining troops with glorious examples of bravery and (iii) never let facts get in the way of nationalistic pride. So from the Last stand of the Manchesters in 1918 on Manchester Hill, it turned out the vast majority were taken capitive to the Glorious Glouscters of the Korean War (again the majority captured). When defeat is looming, you can always find some heros simply by writing about them.

A US example is the Alamo. It is an untouchable legend. Surprisingly a huge amount of details seems to float around about the deaths of the Texan heros but as everyone was killed where does this wealth of knowledge come from? Mexican sources are very contradictory but everything is now fact so it doesnt matter.

Having said all that Last Stands happen and soldiers die because they have to. I am a combat veteran ( Vietnam), in my generation , in my Army, it is the stand of D Company, 6 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment at Long Tan on 18th August 1966. 120 men against 2500. ( a company vs a Regiment). 11 Platoon was seperated from the rest of the Company, its Officer dead in the first minutes of combat, its Sgt Bob Buick held the platoon together as causalties mounted and ammunition dwindled.

Even today he speaks of seeing his men, fixing bayonets and grabbing entrenching tools to fight to the last. Happily (by skill) he was able to link his platoon up to the rest of the company after some hours and they held on to a relief column fought their way through. Bob Buick only got an MM for that day, he deserved a VC.

But men can be prepared to die as a group, any nationality, courage is universal.

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TISO
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Post by TISO » 19 Feb 2006 15:11

Since thre were some naval examples, how about one Russian legend:
protected cruser of 1.st rang Varyag:
The Russian cruiser Varyag was leaving Jemulpo Harbor, today known as Incheon, when it was surprised and attacked by a Japanese squadron. The battle took place 102 years ago on February 9, 1904, a day before Imperial Japan declared war against Russia.
Among the 557 crew members, 37 were killed and 190 were injured in the battle. However, the Varyag did not surrender. The remaining crew instead chose to scuttle the ship off Pung Island, near Pyeongtaek. The survivors escaped in life rafts. The Russian Navy takes pride in the Varyag's story of resistance. Russia embellished the defeat as a heroic act of resistance in a battle between two imperialists over the Korean Peninsula.
The Varyag was salvaged and repaired by the Japanese, who used it as a warship until handing it back to Russia in 1916. The ship's homecoming added a new chapter in its legend, though it was scrapped in 1923.
From:JoongAng Daily - Russia's pride, China's boat
There are couple of songs about this ship:
Varyag 1904 version - Text in Russian(Music: A.S. Turishev Lyrics: R.Greinz tr by E.Studenskaya 1904)

Instumental version by military orchestra:
Varyag (march)(Music: A.S. Turishev 1904)

and by my opinion the best:
Varyag (Cold waves splash)- text in Russian(Music: F. Bogoroditsky Lyrics: Y. Repninsky Singer: Ans. of Black Sea Fleet)

Varyag at Chemulpo harbour:
Image

Varyag sunk:
Image

Koreets:
Image

Pic's from:
http://www.russojapanesewar.com/index.html
Last edited by TISO on 28 Dec 2006 20:37, edited 1 time in total.

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