Turkish Brigade in Korean War

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 26 Aug 2006 02:08

1952 POW OLYMPICS
Names of participating POW's
Express your views via the Korean War Bulletin Board
Express your views on a dedicated 1952 POW Olympics Bulletin Board


The North Korean People's Army was brutal in the extreme. There are innumerable documentaries of their murder of helpless POWs and countless South Korean civilians. To list only a few:
Hill 303 Massacre
Murdered South Korean civilians
Murdered soldier
Not Forgotten by POWs
Historical accounts

Ignoring the evidence on the theory that telling the same lie often enough will make most people believe it, the communists continually attempted to portray the "People's Republic" as a paradise. Among the lesser known communist propaganda efforts was an attempt to use the POWs in an "Olympics" (November 15-27, 1952) to pretend that these pathetic, vulnerable, defenseless human beings were actually well treated, living and enjoying healthy activities in a communist wonderland.
POW Inter-Camp Olympics booklet of 1952
A North Korean POW camp

Repatriation of POWs was at the heart of why the North Koreans interrupted the peace talks in 1952, since it was apparent to them that large numbers of North Korean POWs would defect to the South if given freedom of choice (as some 25,000 of them eventually did). Projecting the idea that UN troops were also happy in captivity must have seemed a way to retrieve such a loss of face in the sight of the whole world. At all events, examining the timing of the "Olympics" in the light of the history of the truce talks it is clear that this was a major propaganda effort by the North Koreans.
Summary of Armistice Negotiations

Exactly why these POWs participated in such a propaganda activity, one which belittled their own suffering as well as masking the cruelty and brutality of their captors, is known only to them.

Many of them appear obvious self-serving collaborators.
Collaboration

But it is certain that many of them were coerced. For instance, Tom Hollis is listed as a "Worker" in that pamphlet, and his own idea of his POW experience is listed in his personal account.
Tom

But there were many others who would not be coerced, some of whom died rather than submit.
Slim Madden

Most tragic from my point of view, some of the bloodiest fighting of the war took place while this propaganda card was being prepared and played.
Army Overview Version of the Stalemate years

Those who participated in this propaganda effort need to be identified, whatever their reasons, however long ago. To honor those POW's who did not collaborate in any way; to honor those POW's who died resisting their captors; to honor those POW's who never got home again. Accordingly, the names and activities of those supporting these "Olympics" are recorded below.

These names are written with humility and compassion. While I served in the Korean War, I can't begin to understand the horrors they may have experienced. We have a right to know who they were, but only those who survived similar ordeals with honor have a right to condemn them.

Bert Kortegaard, USN, 798 94 66, PHIBPAC '50-'52.


OLYMPIC RESULTS
INTER-CAMP OLYMPIC CHAMPIONS
PLACE CAMP No.
1 5
2 1
3 4

INDIVIDUAL HIGH SCORES
PLACE NAME NATIONALITY
1 Miller, Delmar G. US
2 Crawford, Norman US
3 Eagles, Anthony P. BR

100 METER DASH
PLACE NAME NATIONALITY RECORD POINTS
1 Thomas , John L. US 10' 6/10 s. 7
2 Crawford, Norman " 11' 6/10 s, 5
3 Allen, William M. " 11' 9/10 s. 3

200 METER DASH
1 Clinton, Willie P. US 27' s. 3
2 Allen, Ellis E. " 27' 4/10 s. 5
3 Williams, Kenneth BR 28' s. 3

400 METER DASH
PLACE NAME NATIONALITY RECORD POINTS
1 Eagles, Anthony P. BR 1 m. 1/10 s. 7
2 Yun Byung Ki Korean 1 m. 2 s. 5
3 Pak Te Hwan " 1 m. 6 s. 3

1500 METER WALK
1 Green, George E. BR 8 m. 46 s. 7
2 Dudley, Frank " 8 m. 50 s. 5
3 May, George H. " 9 m. 10 s. 3

3000 METER DASH
1 Ri Sang Kun Korean 10' 33" 7
2 Nam Sang Ok " 10' 33 1/10 s. 5
3 Kim Du Dong " 10' 37" 3
4 Kim Sung Jun " 11' 2" 1
100 METER SACK RACE
1 Crawford, Norman US 27' s. 7
2 Blackbird, George L " 27' 3/10 s. 5
3 Kim, William " 27' 3/10 s. 3

100 METER LOW HURDLES
1 Miller, Delmar G. US 14' 5/10" 7
2 Williams, Kenneth BR 14' 8/10 5
3 Nelder, John " ---------- 3

800 METER RELAY RACE
PLACE CAMP No. RECORD
1 5 1' 49 2/10"
2 4 1' 49 6/10"
3 7 1' 53 9/10"

SHOT PUT
PLACE NAME NATIONALITY RECORD POINTS
1 Watson, William C. US 46" (FEET) 7
2 Shepherd, Raymond " 44' 6". 5
3 King, John C. " 43' 5" 3
HIGH JUMP
1 Polee, William US 5' 6" 7
2 Miller, Delmar G. " 5' 4" 5
3 Tates, Howard T. " 5' 3
BROAD JUMP
1 Eagles, Anthony P. BR 19' 41/2" 7
2 Crawford, Norman US 18' 81/2" 5
3 Miller, Delmar G. " 18' 21/2" 3
4 Jackson, Walter L.Jr. " 17' 5" 1
POLE VAULT
1 Miller, Delmar G. US 9' 9" 7
2 Jones, Robert L. Jr. " 9' 6" 5
3 Deveau, Albert J. " 9' 4" 3

BASKET BALL SOFTBALL
PLACE CAMP No. PLACE CAMP No.
1 1 1 2
2 5 2 1

VOLLEYBALL FOOTBALL
1 2 1 5
2 5 2 4
SOCCER TUG-O'-WAR
1 1 2 5
2 5 2 3


BOXING
DIVISION NAME NATIONALITY POINTS
Featherweight Nishimoto, Tsuyoshi US 7
Flyweight Marquez, Jose A. " 7
Lightweight Hearn, Charles F. " 7
Welterweight Montoya, Celso J. " 7
Middleweight Cross, Sherman " 7
Heavyweight Connacher, Kenneth H. " 7

WRESTLING
DIVISION NAME NATIONALITY POINTS
Middleweight Kazim, Ovec Turkish 7
Heavyweight Arif, Gokce " 7
Korean Wrestling Kim Dung KU Korean 7


PHYSICAL TRAINING DISPLAY
PLACE CAMP No.
1 3

GYMNASTICS
1 7
2 2

ENTERTAINMENT
1 5
2 7




OLYMPIC COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Davies, Thomas H. 6087674 BR Osborne, Chester M. 0-1235485 US
Degrow, Bobby R. RA14319349 US Quarles, D. E. RA6833586 US
Green, John T. 5620356 BR Ray, Edward M. RA14215258 US
Grenier, Richard RA11196656 US Smith,William H. 5499706 BR
Han Se Jang Korean Veneris, James G. RA13009671 US

OLYMPIC OFFICIALS (JUDGES, REFEREES, TIMEKEEPERS, STARTERS, ECT)

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Allman, Donald G. 373024 BR McNeil, Richmon P. RA6267478 US
Ashpole, Robert D. RA37583922 US McTaggart, William C. Jr. A0-2065317 US
Bolton Harry RA6258334 US Minietta, Charles 01179545 US
Bryant, Charles B. RA15431341 US Pethrick, Phillp V. 5183756 BR
Chapman Cyril H. 7893695 BR Rada, Stephen A. RA13273634 US
Dawson, Thomas L. RA35826752 US Ramirez, Joe E. RA18358813 US
De Frontes Earl RA30117232 US Richie, Preston E. RA38562869 US
Green, John T. 5620356 BR Ridlington, Jack H. 5194281 BR
Guthrie, Ronald D. A22139 Australian Shirey, William M. 0-26635 US
Jan Andronikyan 702 Turkish Sin Song Jul Korean
Johnson Eugene RA13286228 US Song Ki Hyup Korean
Jones, Robert L. Jr. ER14183333 US Stanley, Milford W 0-410674 US
Kim Kwang San Korean Sykes, Authur B. 6203560 BR
Kim Yong Ku Korean Whitaker, Charles L. RA15280639 US
Kostegen, Stanley G. RA31502396 US

OLYMPIC TORCH BEARER
Name Serial No. Nationality
Stone, Willis Jr. RA17244521 US


TRACK EVENTS
100-METER DASH

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adkins, Louis L. AF13330829 US Moonter, Norman J. 22378777 BR
Allen Ellis E. RA37213587 US Nelder, John 22511833 BR
Allen, William M. RA16295846 US Pak Yung Ki Korean
Almendariz, Raymond RA18345964 US Pough, Albert. Jr. RA16260907 US
Bellamy, Jesse RA14342136 US Rafet, Izmir 6043 Turkish
Blackbird, George L. RA19315814 US Ragland, Dayton W. A0-1910271 US
Brown, Billy A. 1108329 US Ramirez, Joe E. RA18358813 US
Chun Re Sin Korean Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Clinton, Willie P. RA16279705 US Sanders, John D. RA18329550 US
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Scahill, James P. RA12286061 US
Davis, Harold W. RA18332026 US Seward, Phillip RA14325481 US
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Sung, Kyung Kong Korean

Freeman, Russell L. RA13268529 US Thomas, John L. RA13350012 US
Hampton, Larney. Jr. RA16262169 US Thorton, John W. 391003 US
Jackson, Walter L. Jr. 0-1686780 US Trotter, John W. RA18280244 US
Kim Dong Jul Korean Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR
Kim Yong Ku Korean Yun Yang Su Korean
Long, James H. RA13271524 US

200-METER DASH
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Achee, Edward R. RA16224366 US Kappel, Thomas RA13298445 US
Allen, Ellis E. RA37213587 US Kim Dong Jul Korean
Allen, William M. RA16295846 US Kim Yong Ku Korean
Almendaraz, Raymond RA18345964 US Long, James H. RA13271524 US
Anderson, Alvin J. 0-1913286 US Maldonado, Milton RA12347223 US
Bellamy, Jesse RA14342136 US Moore, Walter O. RA14334403 US
Blackbird, George L. RA19315814 US Pak Myong Hwan Korean
Cho Man Pok Korean Pak Yung Ki Korean
Clinton, WillieP. RA16279705 US Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Collins, Kenneth H. 14189945 BR Quarles, Frank J. RA35731341 US
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Rowland, Eugene RA17083817 US
Davis, Harold W. RA18332026 US Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Fisher, Kenneth F. 22113093 BR Seward, Phillip RA14325481 US
Freeman, Russell L. RA13268529 US Sung Yung Kong Korean
Hampton, Larney Jr. RA16262169 US Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR
Hawkesworth, Harry 19046803 BR Wilson, Robert RA1334396 US
Jackson, Walter L Jr. 0-1686780 US

400- METER DASH
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adkins, Lous L. AF13330829 US Rafet IzKimar 6043 Turkish
Anderson, Alvin J. 0-1913286 US Rowland, Eugene RA17083817 US
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Hawksworth, Harry 19046803 BR Ryo Uh Duk Korean
Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US Sin Song Jul Korean
Hwang Pok Su Korean Stanfill, Herman F. 0-47753 US
Kim Jul Kun Korean Swatton, Herbert J. 22357266 BR
Kim Ki Pyong Korean Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR
Ko Uh Byun Korean Tamaki, Yoshi RA10104224 US
Marshall, George E. 22436971 BR Wilson, Robert RA13344396 US
McClain, Roy H. RA16332888 US Wright, Kenneth R. RA15422582 US
Na Myong Song Korean Yates, Robert 22207712 BR
Pak Te Hwan Korean Yun Byung Ki Korean
1500 METER WALK
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Allen, Ellis E. RA37213587 US Kim Ki Su Korean
Chang Chi Pyun May, George H. 926120 BR
Coltman, Reginald W. 22525377 BR Newhouse, George E. 5183954 BR
Dantzler, Earl RA33861838 US Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Drake, Brady H. RA13312718 US Ri Kyu Sun Korean
Green, George E. 22230081 BR Ryo Che Sik Korean
Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US Stewart, Samuel 22233418 BR

3000-METER DASH
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Agurrie Alfredo R. US54050058 US Kim Sung Jun Korean
Benneysworth, Thomas E. 22188369 BR Maher, Patrick 22233423 BR
Champagne, Hartwell J. RA18284011 US Nam Sang Ok Korean
Dodd, Robert 14450175 BR Prokop, Alios US511020791 US
Elliot, Leslie 14471610 BR Ri Sang Kun Korean
Holmes, Thomas J. 14470172 BR Ri Su Man Korean
Irfan, Dumlupinar 2951 Turkish Rodriguez, Lupe C. RA18319851 US
Jennings, Henry 22212720 BR Wilson, Robert RA13344396 US
Kim Du Dong Korean

100 METER SACK RACE
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adkins, Louis L. AF13330829 US Pak Myong Hwan Korean
Allen, William N. RA16295846 US Peterson, Carl D. RA18256126 US
Bellamy, Jesse RA14342136 US Plum, Gary W. RA13347531 US
Berry, Waldron 1748OA US Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Blackbird, George L. RA19315814 US Rea, Frank Jr. RA18243959 US
Brown, Billy A. 1108329 US Rowland, Eugene RA17083817 US
Chun Re Sin Korean Seward, Phillip RA14325481 US
Clinton, Willie P. RA16270705 US Song I Hyun Korean
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Tamaki, Yoshio RA10104224 US
Hwang Pok Su Korean Thorton, John W. 391003 US
Irfan, Dumlupinar 2951 Turkish Trotter, John W. RA18280244 US
Kelly, Lonnie J. RA19332662 US Wilson, Louis 0-61384 US
Lyles, Edward H. 0-1186421 US Zapata, Cipriano D. PA508995 PI
Martin, Emmette R. RA15250403 US

100 METER LOW HURDLES
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Allen, William M. RA162995846 US Miller, Delmar G. US56065461 US
Anderson Alvin J. 0-1913286 US Nelder, John 22511833 BR
Boyd, Charles R. RA15284215 US Pak Te Hwan Korean
Brown Billy A. 1108329 US Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Cho Man Pok Korean Ri Jan Ko Korean
Crawford, Norman RA3490983 US Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Dodd, Robert 14450175 BR Stockting, Roland G. 14468948 BR
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Thornton, John W. 391003 US
Greer, Samuel H. 14457219 BR Trotter, John W. RA18280244 US
Kelly, Lonnie J. RA19332662 US Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR

Kim, William RA10103457 US Witt, James R. A0-725830 US
Ko Uh Byun Korean Yun Byung Ki Korean
Long, James H. RA13271524 US Yun Yang Su Korean
Lord, James A. 22530300 BR Zapata, Cipriano D. PA508995 PI
Mehmet, Kiline 5669 Turkish

800 METER RELAY RACE
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adkins, Louis L. AF13330829 US Kim Jul Kun Korean
Allen William M. RA16295846 US Long, James H. RA13271524 US
Almendarez, Raymond RA18345964 US Maldonada, Milton RA12347223 US
Brown, Billy A. 1108329 US Na Myong Ki Korean
Clinton, Willie P. RA16279705 US Pak Yung Ki Korean
Collins, Kenneth H. 14189945 BR Ragland, Dayton W. A0-1910271 US
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Ridlington, Jack H. 5194281 BR
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Ryo Uh Duk Korean
Hampton, Larry Jr. RA16262169 US Sanders, John D. RA18329550 US
Hawkesworth, Harry 19046803 BR Thomas, John L. RA13350012 US
Jackson, Walter L. Jr. 0-1686780 US Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR
Kappel, Thomas RA13298445 US

FIELD EVENTS
SHOT PUT
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Chang Chi Pyun Korean Paulina, John P. RA13315576 US
Crawford, David 6985614 BR Royster, William H. RA33223909 US
Gorr, Robert R. RA16307390 US Shepherd, Raymond RA15378446 US
Hensley, Marshal O. RA13320197 US Stauber, Cavlin C. US54001167 US
Kim Man Su Korean Wagner, Auther 0-32680 US
King, John C. RA35800984 US Watson,William C. 0-1336983 US

HIGH JUMP

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Allen, Ellis E. RA37213587 US Miller, Delmar G. US56065461 US
Carvalho, Paul P. RA29050967 US Pek Kay Shu Korean
Dawson, Thomas L. RA35826752 US Polee, William RA19305201 US
Jang Suk Kyu Korean Ri Kyu Sun Korean
Joyce,Kenneth J. H. 22332685 BR Summers, Richard F. RA16307832 US
McMillin, Grant L. RA16302197 US Tates, Howard T. RA36594764 US

BROAD JUMP (Long)

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Anderson, Phillip US53041565 US Moore, Walter O. RA14334403 US
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Paulini, John P. RA13315576 US
Davidson, Eudell H. RA13329041 US Pek Ki Shu Korean
Domenech, Jaime O. RA12301744 US Perkins, Albert H. 14191618 BR
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Ri Kyu Sun Korean
Irfan, Dumlupinar 2951 Turkish Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Jackson, Walter L .Jr. 0-1686780 US Sanders, John L. RA14225733 US
Jang Suk Kyu Korean Stanfill, Herman F. 0-47753 US
Kim Mun Hwan Korean Summers, Richard F. RA16307832 US
Lewis, William Jr. RA15266806 US Taylor, George J. R. 7886974 BR
Miller, Delimar G. US56065461 US Woodley, Perry F. RA14347485 US

POLE VAULT
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Belcher, Roy O. RA15436074 US Nielson, Henry L. A0-1912010 US
Brown, Billy A. 1108329 US Sirk, Kenneth L. RA15272210 US
Deveau, Albert J. RA31464900 US Solomon, Oscar RA19361233 US
Domenech Jaime O. RA12301744 US Summers Richard F. RA16307832 US
Gwadera, Marian X/21001168 BR Weaver, John E. RA15207212 US
Jones, Robert L. Jr. ER14183333 US Witt, James R. A0-725830 US
Miller, Delmar G. US56065461 US Wright, Kenneth R. RA15422581 US
BASKETBALL
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Booth, Clyde D. RA13343687 US Cornwell, Michael C. RA15277930 US
Davis, Richard K. ER15419627 US Dantzler, Earl RA33861838 US
Farmer, Clyde E. ER17243763 US Dawson, Thomas L. RA35826752 US
Gaylets, Thomas B. RA13335525 US De Frontes Earl RA30117232 US
Head, Carl R. RA15416816 US House, William W. ER18209545 US
McAuliffe, Raymond J. ER37737076 US Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US
McMurtrie, Thomas H. US52039197 US Jones, Robert L. Jr. EA14183333 US
Reeves, HenryE. RA18359052 US Martin, Emmette B. RA15250403 US
Beale, George W. A 18629 US Miller, Paul B. RA34946104 US
Foshee, Billy B. A0-2101970 US Morgan, Jerry RA33701418 US
Jackson, Walter L. Jr. 0-1686780 US Patterson, Joseph S. RA13166213 US
McLaughlin, John N. 0-8433 US Allen, Robert W. RA13123228 US
McTaggart. William C. Jr. A0-2065317 US Brooks, Al W. RA17277478 US
Miller, Loris R.. A0-1908938 US Clevenger, Edward E. RA19351555 US
Roach, Paul A Jr. 0-62605 US Dixon, Albert RA34063680 US
Wagner, Arthur 0-32680 US Fletcher, Robert W. RA16328683 US
Watson, William C. 0-1336983 US Francione, Thomas V. RA13282027 US
Witt, James R. A0-725830 US Freeman, Russell L. RA13268529 US
Charging, Kenneth US55039611 US Hatter Jesse Jr. RA18330918 US
Charles, Ernest J. RA15256690 US Hinton, Edgar J. RA17275179 US
Cossette, Joseph E. RA16296975 US Magiera, Steven E. ER16225986 US
Davidson, Eudell H. RA13329041 US Miller, Delmar G. US56065461 US
Hancock, John W. RA14275065 US Moore, Walter O. RA14334403 US
Kostegan, Stanley J. RA31502396 US Pearman Charles O. RA14352046 US
Mellin, Raymonf B. RA11194217 US Ramirez, Joe E. RA18358813 US
Rada, Stephen A. RA13273634 US Sortillo, Elliot RA13344251 US
Trujillo, Margarito RA18253556 US Spencer, William J. RA13344592 US
Wright, Kenneth R. RA15422581 US Stegall, Jack L. RA17252973 US
Allen, Ellis E. RA37213587 US Tinsley, Donald L. RA13349465 US
Blackbird, George L. RA19315814 US Thomas, John L. RA1350012 US
Carver, Roy L. RA14219901 US
VOLLEYBALL
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Arakaki, Kazumi RA10104646 US Lide. Charles RA13270828 US
Banash, Alfred P. ER13278387 US Santini, Gilberto RA10405657 US
Farmer, Clyde R. ER17243763 US Verano, Albert Q. ER10732904 US
Makua, Richard K. US50001626 US Waiau, Oliver RA20014703 US
Morita, Hisashi US50000340 US Ali, Ferah 4336 Turkish
Rosado, Juan T. RA10403439 US Dagooc, Teofilo S. PA501786 PI
Souza, Harald RA50000158 US Fajardo, Adolfo J. PA474191 PI
Vosberg, James B. US52082941 US Figueroa, Victor RA12324321 US
Cobalis, Vincent J. W-906667 US Meyers, John E. RA13269744 US
Copeland, Robert B. 0-1165601 US Miller, Delmer G. US56065461 US
Esensten, Sidney 0-1766261 US Mire, Nathaniel L. PA500827 PI
Jackson, Walter L. Jr. 0-1686780 US Moreno, Raymond RA13314063 US
McLaughlin, John N. 0-8434 US Naito, Tadao RA30112082 US
McTaggart, William C .Jr. A0-2065317 US Pearman, Charles E. RA14352046 US
Miller, Loris R. A0-1908938 US Prevost, Clement 1410 French
Wagner, Arthur 0-32680 US Prokop, Alois US51020791 US
Witt, James R. A0-725830 US Ramirez, Joe E. RA18358813 US
Anguino, Benito J. RA19330402 US Rivera, Perez P. RA30417426 US
Archambault, Leroy J. RA17263721 US Spencer, William J. RA13344592 US
Baylis, Raymond B. RA13280754 US Tates, Howard T. RA36594764 US
Donemech, Jamie O. RA12301744 US Chung Sang Sik Korean
Estep, Harold R. RA13331286 US Chung Sin Sup Korean
Short, Donald G. RA18268753 US Kang Mun Jul Korean
Tamaye, Goichi RA10103601 US Ko Ki Kwan Korean
Carver, Roy L. RA14219901 US Ri Jan Ko Korean
Dantzler, Earl RA33861838 US Ri Wan Kyu Korean
House, William W. ER18209545 US Sin Ryong Kap Korean
Jimenez, Dominador V. PA472636 PI Song Ki Hyup Korean
SOCCER
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Aicken, Andrew 7020881 BR Ewan, Alexander 2754347 BR
Bruce, Alexander 22208642 BR Flanagan, Thomas 3130672 BR
Benneyworth, Thomas E. 22188369 BR Gill, Arthur 3450830 BR
Basham, Edward 5726494 BR Heaney, William 2889823 BR
Clark, David T. 22192168 BR Heron, William H. 22244495 BR
Dimmelow, Bernard 22530301 BR Hoyle, Bryan 22436963 BR
Hawkesworth, Harry 19046803 BR Ismail, Demirdelen 2803 Turkish
Magill, Andrew 21012612 BR Jan, Andronikyan 702 Turkish
McIntyre, Herbert J. 5570242 BR Kerr, Hugh 22433448 BR
McMillan, Fred 22307082 BR Madone, Rene 142 French
Montgomery, Patrick 19035551 BR McCrory, John 22387508 BR
Ross, Ernest 22522036 BR Ryan, Patrick 22204446 BR
Crawford, David 6985614 BR Spiers, Frank 22406515 BR
Newhouse, George E. 5183954 BR Spurr, Albert 327000 BR
Andrews, Frederick W. 330079 BR Street, William 864660 BR
Cottam, Frank W. 14725216 BR Williams, Peter F. 22243665 BR
Jenkins, Eric J. 14449091 BR Wilson, Robert RA13344396 US
McAnulty, Daniel 4538041 BR Zeki, Yurukoglu 1113 Turkish
Petro, Gordon L. RA12356658 US Chang Chi Pyun Korean
Pethrick, Philip V. 5183756 BR Chung Ha Sun Korean
Smythe, James W. 14462559 BR Jiuh Hak Pok Korean
Sykes, Arthur B. 6203560 BR Jiuh Kan Sik Korean
Taylor, George J.R. 7886974 BR Jiuh Ung Kyu Korean
Tuggey, Norman H. 14183650 BR Kim Dong Kan Korean
Watson, John G. 22207538 BR Kim Duk Su Korean
Ali Ferah 4336 Turkish Kim Kwang San Korean
Biever, Arie 26045004 Hollander Pak Myung Sik Korean
Canavan, Bernard C. 22219086 BR Pak Sam Jun Korean
Constable, Maurice 22411087 BR Pak ung Suh Korean
Cowell John H. 22431399 BR Pang Dal Song Korean
SOFTBALL
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Arias, Robert R. 1109634USMC US Caulder, Richard L. RA5740559 US
Bassett, Kenneth J. USMC1072425 US Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US
Cline, Roy E. RA13347056 US Debenedict, Julius J. RA12308578 US
Delacruz, Baldomero ER18223448 US Hawkins, Hiawatha RA18259467 US
Hansen, Calvin C. RA11190765 US Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US
Kline, George F. RA13336108 US Howell, Bobbie J. RA16291875 US
Lewis, Guy L. RA18311666 US Jones, Robert L. Jr. ER14183333 US
Payne Euell B. US53025642 US McNeil, Richmon P. RA6267478 US
Sub, Andrew RA13343705 US Morgan, Jerry RA33701484 US
Traynham, Robert L. RA14331209 US Naukkari, Robert E. RA16305247 US
Wetzler, Emil J. ER55001268 US Patterson, Joseph S. RA13166213 US
Wheeler, Bernard L. RA13258458 US Sprouse, Teddy R. RA17260443 US
Beale, George W. A18629 US Davis, Prestee RA14165098 US
Bednarz, Joseph P. 0-1336864 US Dixon, Albert RA34063680 US
Berry, Waldron 17480A US Figueroa, Victor RA12324321 US
Lundquist, Carl R. 0-51303 US Fletcher, Robert W. RA16328683 US
McLaughlin, John N. 0-8433 US Hatter, Jesse Jr. RA18330918 US
McTaggart, William C. A0-2065317 US Krammes, Richard J. RA13340906 US
Minietta, Charles 0-1179545 US Magiera, Steven E. ER16225986 US
Miller, Loris R. A0-1908938 US McClure, Amos RA17233610 US
Pecoraro, Anthony 0-59873 US Meyers, John E. RA13269744 US
Perry, Jack E. 0-27307 US Miller, Delmar G. US56065461 US
Wagner, Arthur 0-32680 US Miller, Herbert A. RA42096776 US
Witt, James R. A0-725830 US Moore, Walter O. RA14334403 US
Anguino, Benito J. RA19330402 US Scott, James F. RA13166261 US
Bingham, George M. RA15266691 US Sortillo, Elliott RA13344251 US
Cook, Waldo F. RA13332222 US Tates, Howard T. RA36594764 US
Cossette, Joseph E. RA16296975 US Torre, Julio RA44109645 US
Domenech, Jaime O. RA12301744 US Timpanaro, Joseph RA42188184 US
Fontana, Anthony S. RA19294548 US Wilson, Robert RA13344396 US
Hancock, John W. RA14275065 US Woods, David RA17235679 US
Hernandez, Abraham R. RA18322772 US Wright, William E. RA18273605 US
Jeter, Frank E. RA13319398 US Brooks Al W. RA17277478 US
Kostegan, Stanley J. RA31502396 US Thomas, John L. RA13350012 US
Lewis, Robert E. RA14295433 US Tolerson, Benjamin D. RA28213761 US
Ripple, Howard L. RA13276951 US Webster, Purvis D. RA38061043 US
Tamaye, Goichi RA10103601 US Worley, John R. RA18342306 US
Tolan, Joseph W. RA23889127 US
FOOTBALL
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Bingham, George M. RA15266691 US Hensley, Marshal O. RA13320197 US
Bolinsky, Walter J. RA13316066 US Jennings, Henry 22212720 BR
Charles, Ernest J. RA15256690 US Manka, Thomas M. RA37125419 US
Davidson,Eudell H. RA13329041 US McMurtrie, Thomas H. US52039197 US
Fontana, Anthony S. RA19294548 US Paulina, John P. RA13315576 US
Hancock, John W. RA14275065 US Reeves, Henry E. RA18359052 US
Hernandez, Abraham R. RA18322772 US Wheeler Bernard L. RA13258458 US
Lawson, John M. RA17195374 US Woodley, Perry F. RA14347485 US
Lewis, Robert E. RA14295433 US Aikin, Herbert P. RA15278433 US
Marks, Delbert L. USMC1172211 US Allen, Robert W. RA13123228 US
Mellin, Raymond B. RA11194217 US Allen, William M. RA16295846 US
Mickelberg, Albert RA13273264 US Bolden, Daniel RA13166392 US
Rada, Stephen A. RA13273634 US Campbell, Billy J. RA19363916 US
Ray, Edward M. RA14215258 US Canterbury, Kimball O. RA38519472 US
Ripple, Howard L. RA13276951 US Contillo, Dominic J. RA11177094 US
Scahill, James P. RA12286061 US Carter, Jerry L. RA19352436 US
Sizemore, Jessie L. RA18334832 US Cookson, Art J. RA19241124 US
Tamaye, Goichi RA10103601 US Corey, Thomas W. RA19356601 US
Wright, Francis H. RA29045022 US Davis, William H. RA18267011 US
Ashpole, Robert D. RA37583922 US Dixon, Albert RA34063680 US
Bowens, Charles D. RA44187616 US Dobson, James G. RA14356884 US
Brown, Johnnie C. RA14291360 US Douglas, Rufus E. RA38713869 US
Carver, Roy L. RA14219901 US Fletcher, Robert W. RA16328683 US
Clinton, Willie P. RA16279705 US Francione, Thomas V. RA13282027 US
Cloud, Donald G. RA38781943 US Gambocurta, Henry RA13315507 US
Coon, Harley J. RA15267664 US Girdano, Anthony RA13299337 US
Cornwall, Michael C. RA15277930 US Grant, Thomas RA14275733 US
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US Hall, William H. RA15417953 US
Debenedict, Julius J. RA1230 8578 US Hatter, Jesse Jr. RA18330918 US
Dantzler, Earl RA33861838 US Hoffman, Marvin L. RA13329455 US
Dawson, Thomas L. RA35826752 US Levert, Caris RA14363378 US
Drake, Brady H. RA13312718 US Magiera, Steven E. ER16225986 US
Hampton, Larney Jr. RA16262169 US McClure, Amos RA17233610 US
Hawkins, Hiawatha RA18259467 US McGreevy, Robert L. RA13347206 US
Hewlett, Edward RA16264981 US Melesio, Joseph M. RA19327546 US
Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US Moore, Walter O. RA14334403 US
Howell, Bobbie J. RA16291875 US Pallas, Theodore M. US56053493 US
Johnson, Eugene RA13286228 US Ramirez, Joe E. RA18358813 US
Kartye, Joseph D. RA15413101 US Rix, Lawrence A. RA16328439 US
Kelly, Lomnie J. RA19332662 US Simonetti, Vincent G. RA15283680 US
Kim, William RA10103457 US Sortillo Elliot RA13344251 US
Morgan, Jerry RA33701484 US Taylor, Rafe M. RA18342382 US
Naukkari, Robert E. RA16305247 US Timpanaro, Joseph RA42188184 US
Patterson, Joseph F. RA13166213 US Tinsley, Donald L. RA13349465 US
Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US Torre, Julio RA44109645 US
Seward, Phillip RA14325481 US Walden, Isaac W. ER57503891 US
Spivey, Walter P. RA14337585 US Wells, Tyree G. RA18261993 US
Banash, Alfred P. ER13278387 US White, Phillip RA18335005 US
Barnes, Anthony E. RA17230509 US Woods, David RA17235679 US
Connacher, Kenneth H. RA13315493 US Wright, C. L. RA14320378 US
Degrow, Bobby R. RA14319349 US Davis, Prestee RA14165098 US
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Hill, Oscar C. RA18343960 US
Farmer, Clyde R. ER17243763 US Thomas, John L. RA13350012 US
Gaylets, Thomas B. RA13335525 US
TUG - O' - WAR
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Bilboe, William 3654584 BR Bartholomew, Stanley F. Jr. RA13005857 US
Carvalho, Paul P. RA29050967 US Durham, Francis L. RA13275073 US
Connacher, Kenneth H. RA13315493 US Kartye, Joseph D. RA15413101 US
Crawford, David 6985614 BR King, John C. RA35800984 US
Davies, Thomas H. 6087674 BR Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Farmer, Clyde R. ER17243763 US Robertson, Alan B. ER18044168 US
Green, George E. 22230081 BR Royster, William H. RA33223909 US
Hensley, Marshal O. RA13320197 US Barbour, Hugh 22271021 BR
Jennings, Henry 22212720 BR Beggin, Jeremiah 22243536 BR
Makua, Richard K. US50001626 US Booth, Nathaniel US50323046 US
Nelder, John 22511833 BR Buck, Donald P. 2/400000 Australian
Reeves Henry E. RA18359052 US Cook, Jessie B. RA14347243 US
Souza, Harald RA50000158 US Douglas, Rufus E. RA38713869 US
Stauber, Calvin C. US54001167 US Floyd, Delmas F. RA18281341 US
Wetzler, Emil J. ER55001268 US Gorr, Robert R. RA16307390 US
Adkins, Louis L. AF13330829 US Heron, William H. 22244459 BR
Anderson, Clarence L. 0-61069 US Hollis Thomas H.J. 2/400311 Australian
Beale, George W. A18629 US Limb, Eric C. 22435841 BR
Copeland, Robert B. 0-1165601 US Lodge, Walter 926722 BR
Esensten, Sidney 0-1766261 US McManus, Edward H. 6030907 BR
Hedlund, Harry F. A0-772366 US Medcalf, Walter RA18330118 US
McLaughlin, John N. 0-8433 US Morrison, Joe RA17278678 US
Stanfill, Herman F. 0-47753 US Oakley, Jerry L. RA19354552 US
Wagner, Arthur 0-32680 US Rogers, Clayton V. RA18274485 US
Watson, William C. 0-1336983 US Smithey, Paul C. RA18321197 US
Charging, Kenneth US55039611 US Stone, Floyd L. US55110466 US
Cossette, Joseph E. RA16296975 US Williams, Kenneth 22307670 BR
Fontana, Anthony S. RA19294548 US Chung Sin Sop Korean
Hancock, John W. RA14275065 US Kim Ki Su Korean
Hernandez, Abraham R. RA18322772 US Kim Man Su Korean
Kirk, James W. RA18304569 US Pak Te Hwan Korean
Lawson, John M. RA17195374 US Pek Ki Shu Korean
Sanders, John D. RA18329550 US Pyo Che Sik Korean
Short, Donald D. RA18268753 US Ri Choi Ki Korean
Wright, Frances H. RA29045022 US Ri Tuk Mun Korean
Ashpole, Robert D. RA37583922 US Yang Byung Hwal Korean

BOXING
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adair, Sammie RA13332596 US Katsaros, Steve ER57511273 US
Adams, Clarence C. RA14267602 US Lunn, Roosevelt A. RA13341273 US
Barnes, Anthony E. RA17230509 US Marques, Jose A. RA17267385 US
Bowens, Charles D. RA44187616 US Massey, Marshall R. RA18281347 US
Boyd, Robert H. RA57221571 US Montoya, Celso J. RA25637810 US
Connacher, Kenneth H. RA13315493 US Nishimoto,Tsuyoshi J. RA10103573 US
Cross, Sherman RA15266364 US Pough, Albert Jr. RA16260907 US
Drake, Brady H. RA13312718 US Preston, Cecil V. RA19358887 US
Eaton, Kenneth L. RA19259491 US Robertson, Alan B. ER18044168 US
Hatter, Jessie Jr. RA18330918 US Soto, Hipolito C. RA17259175 US
Hern, Charles F. RA17235384 US Wright, C. L. RA14320378 US
WRESTLING
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Ahmet, Akdag 4338 Turkish Mehmet, Gocer 826 Turkish
Arif, Gokce 5049 Turkish Mevlut, Kanat 1772 Turkish
Dantzler, Earl RA33861838 US Niyazi, Kaya 4374 Turkish
Holmes, William D. RA57156812 US Pek Ki Shu Korean
Jiuh, Sang Kyu Korean Ri Choi Ki Korean
Kadir, Uzulmez 4286 Turkish Ri Tuk Mun Korean
Kartye, Joseph D. RA15413101 US Vasquez, Manuel RA18335511 US
Kazim, Ovec 3084 Turkish Yang Byung Hwal Korean
Kim Dong Ku Korean

PHYSICAL TRAINING DISPLAY
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adair, Sammie RA13332596 US Dudley, Frank 22530061 BR
Ball, James L. RA15288515 US Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR
Berry, Elmer RA18280230 US Fisher, Kenneth F. 22113093 BR
Berry, James H. RA13305831 US Green, George E. 22230081 BR
Byrd, John H. RA14267701 US Hawkesworth, Harry 19046803 BR
Calveley, Arthur 22273012 BR Jennings, Henry 22212720 BR
Clarke, Keith 22511801 BR Joyce, Kenneth J. H. 22332685 BR
Clubb, Charles E. RA17264263 US Lord, James A. 22530300 BR
Coleman, Carlton H. RA13349870 US Magill, Andrew 21012612 BR
Condron, Andrew M. CH/X4710 BR Maher, Patrick 22233423 BR
Conner, Alfred J. US13279543 US McIntyre, Herbert J. 5570242 BR
Connley, James M. RA57401254 US McMillan, Fred 22307082 BR
Cox, William H. RA16274650 US Moonter, Norman J. 22378777 BR
Craft, Norris D. RA18351111 US Nelder, John 22511833 BR
Crilly, Francis 22204982 BR Newhouse, George E. 5183954 BR
Darby, Terence R. RM9330 BR Perkins, Albert H. 14191618 BR
Davison, Joseph 14188143 BR Stockting, Donald C. 14468948 BR
Deveau, Albert J. RA31464900 US Swatton, Herbert J. 22357266 BR
Diggs, James N. RA13270851 US Yaytes, Robert 22207712 BR
Dunford, Berten E. RA13332945 US Miller, James E. RA16304601 US
Elliott, Gordon 19049020 BR Mitchell, Fon RA15251692 US
Evans, Robert 22271508 BR Murray, Wesley RA12255190 US
Feather, Russell B. RA13333485 US Nolan, Almond L. RA12115667 US
Gallacher, James C. RA12319444 US O'Hanlon, Felix 7014134 BR
Garland, Graeme N. 203858 BR Ousley, Gary L. RA18340938 US
Gray, George W. RA10352401 US Pace, Robert L. RA13365416 US
Hall, William H. RA15417953 US Parker, Robert S. 22246618 BR
Harris, Clarence RA16261687 US Perry, Glacel E. RA15272109 US
Herbert, Edwin A. 19034958 BR Powell, John W. RA11191883 US
Herndon, Rogers RA14353051 US Reilly, William 22406512 BR
Hill, Oscar C. RA18343960 US Ruickbie, William 22406513 BR
Hopkins, Stephen RA13344666 US Rush, Scott L. RA15277362 US
Hughes, Bobby J. RA18341361 US Shirk, William L. RA15277109 US
Janda, Bohus J. RA18319947 US Simpson, Alfred L. RA13352858 US
Jayroe, Johnnie R. RA18298298 US Simpson Robert L. RA19325732 US
Kaiser, Arthur L. RA13352001 US Sirk, Kenneth L. RA15272210 US
Kerns, Abraham RA18342363 US Slaten, Lindsey L. RA18349649 US
Knott, Albert E. 4869190 BR Smith, Charles M. RA13348375 US
Leak, Leonard 877723 BR Smith, James W. RA57317140 US
Maguare, Robert W. 22307155 BR Spencer, Edward F. 3654393 BR
Martinez, Isaac RA18322845 US Stephens, Billy W. 14471238 BR
McCauley, Leroy RA37866701 US Stevenson, Joseph 21181083 BR
McDonald, Robert 22299613 BR Sullivan, Larance V. RA19304844 US
McKell, Allen G. 277070 BR Tates, Howard T. RA36594764 US
McKenzie, Samuel 22275061 BR Telford, Edward 21188052 BR
McNally, John N. 22305359 BR Thomas, Rodney O. RA13166624 US
Miles, Arthur 1459498 BR Threat, Albert R. RA13336186 US
Basham, Edward 5726494 BR Tolley, Kenneth R. 19041671 BR
Bennyworth, Thomas E. 22188369 BR Vance, Martin 14412184 BR
Bilboe, William 3654584 BR Vavrek, John F. RA13297860 US
Bruce, Alexander 22208642 BR Villanueva, Richard RA19356956 US
Clark, David T. 22192168 BR Walden, Isaac W. ER57503891 US
Collins, Kenneth H. 14189945 BR Weatherman, Carl RA13332223 US
Coltman, Reginald W. 22525377 BR Welsh, Spencer W. RA13336088 US
Davies, Thomas H. 6087674 BR West, Harrison RA35935722 US
Dimmelow, Bernard 22530301 BR Whittaker, David 22431499 BR

GYMNASTICS
HORIZONTAL BAR

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Jiuh Hyung Yung Korean Thornton, John W. 391003 US
Sung Jang Suh Korean

PARALLEL BARS
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Cloud, Donald G. RA38781943 US McKell, Allen G. 277070 BR
Evans, Edward R. RA16279034 US Ri Sung Man Korean
Gill, Arthur 3450830 BR Seward, Phillip RA14325481 US
Hampton, Larney Jr. RA16262169 US Sullivan, Larance V. RA19304844 US
Jiuh Hyung Yung Thornton, John W. 391003 US
Kim Kil Su Tolley, Kenneth R. 19041671 BR
Leak, Leonard 877723 BR Winn, Alfred 22204202 BR
Maguare, Robert W. 22307155 BR

ENTERTAINMENT
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adams, Howard G. RA38556261 US Kerr, Hugh 22433448 BR
Atkins, George R. RA15232355 US Killion, Richard E. RA19414784 US
Ball, James L. RA15288515 US Kim Hyan Ja Korean
Banaga,Nicolas G. PA504955 PI Kim Kwang Sun Korean
Banghart, William E. RA13278704 US Kim Sang Chin Korean
Batchelor, Claude J. RA18254657 US Kirk, James W. RA18304569 US
Basham, Edward 5726494 BR Ko Su Wan Korean
Beaupre, Jacque RA46041217 US Lam, Leroy V. RA13333385 US
Beckerley Edward G. 7890706 BR Lauri, Robert J. ER12111481 US
Bell, John G. 22286799 BR Lavery, Joseph S. 14187870 BR
Belhomme, Albert C. RA13296992 US Lawson, Kenneth E. RA16304251 US
Berry, Elmer RA18280230 US Leak, Leonard 877723 BR
Best, Oscar RA44183889 US Lewis, William Jr. RA15266806 US
Bolden, Daniel RA13166392 US Lodge, Walter 926722 BR
Boothe, Clyde D. RA13343687 US Lovejoy, Ronald D. RA19326269 US
Brewton, Leonard RA15295448 US Mangle, Mamerto M. RA13344255 US
Brown, James J. Jr. RA14228971 US Marks, Donald R. 21127179 BR
Bruce, Alexander 22208642 BR Martin, John D. RA19290302 US
Bruneid, Anthony Jr. RA13264979 US Martin, William. 22285797 BR
Butcher, Robert D. 22341327 BR Massey, Marshal R. RA18281347 US
Calvan, Don H. RA16280639 US Massey, William 22202796 BR
Camden, William A. RA11187371 US MacDonald, Robert 22299613 BR
Canada, Cornelious US54022654 US McGowain, George RA15424140 US
Carter, Jerry L. RA19352436 US McKell, Allan J. 277070 BR
Carter, Leroy Jr. RA16279986 US McKeown, John RA13344360 US
Castro, Nicasio P. PA503289 PI McManus, Edward H. 6030907 BR
Chapman, Cyril H. 7893695 BR Meanley, Alfred J. 5733709 BR
Cho Ryun De Korean Mendez, Rivera T. ER30415206 US
Clarke, Keith 22511801 BR Miles, Arthur 1459498 BR
Clevenger, Edward E. RA19351555 US Mitchell, Harvey O. RA17233968 US
Coleman, Carlton H. RA13349870 US Excell, Moss US55043845 US
Condron, Andrew M. CH/X4710 BR Moonter, Norman J. 22378777 BR
Conner, Alfred J. RA13279543 US Moore, Johnnie W. RA18256122 US
Cormier, Leo A. Jr. RA11178961 US Mora Rafael R. US51061441 US
Copeland Harry C. RA16313975 US Morales, Raul E. US50101686 US
Crawford, David 6985614 BR Morman, Carlton G. RA18279346 US
Curd, Edward CH/X4426 BR Moxham, Fred 3712359 BR
Dagooc, Teofilos PA501786 PI Murray, Thomas R. RA13294759 US
Danao, Jaime D. PA485294 PI Murray, Wesley RA12255190 US
Daniels, Clifford J. RA19295380 US Newsome, John W. 22232018 BR
Daniels, Willie L. RA38136347 US Nolan, Almond L. RA12115667 US
Davis, James C. RA16312742 US Nordin, Cletys I. ER54040035 US
Davis, Lavange E. RA33850197 US Ogario, Nicolas S. PA504949 PI
Davis, Richard K. ER15419627 US Orteza, Dionisio US50000366 US
DeAnda, Edwardo RA19304005 US Ousley, Gary L. RA18340938 US
Deleon, Ricardo RA18224124 US Pak Wun Yang Korean
Deveau, Albert J. RA31464900 US Parker, Robert S. 22246618 BR
Dickenson, Edward S. RA13164432 US Perkins, Albert H. 14191618 BR
Diggs, James N. RA13270851 US Phillips, Raymond E. RAl8352160 US
Disney, Donald B. RA15284043 US Pinkston, James L. RA14310890 US
Dominguez, Willie RA18346003 US Polk, L. C. US55054017 US
Dooley, Richard 410960 BR Powell, John W. RA11191883 US
Duncan, Charlie RA13230239 US Quarles, Frank J. RA35731341 US
Dunham, Wallace L. US52138216 US Quibell, Frederick 2246092 BR
Dunn, Harold M. RA18301314 US Ri Kwang Gun Korean
Eagles, Anthony P. 14475226 BR Richards, George R. P0/X6153 BR
Eaton, Kenneth L. RA19259491 US Robertson, Elmer L. RA15421676 US
Ekenbarger, John RA11168550 US Rowley, Peter F. 22276631 BR
Elliott, Gordon 19049020 BR Rush, Scott L. RA15277362 US
English, Edward 6980243 BR Sanchez, Marcelino I. RA17142432 US
Evans, Robert 22271508 BR Sayre, George M. RA29051006 US
Evans, Rodney 0. RA12325303 US Serenelli, Mario J. US51021217 US
Fahnestock, Charles I. RA13342678 US Shelley, Roy 6979731 BR
Feathers, Russell R. 13333485 US Sherrick, Donald V. RA17256203 US
Felix, Roger 1372 French Sibonga, Amando S. PA501064 PI
Field, Maurice E. RA17254117 US Simpson, Robert L. RA19325732 US
Flanagan, Thomas 3130672 BR Sin Che Pil Korean
Flores, Torres R. US50100512 US Sirk, Kenneth L. RA15272210 US
Frantz, David RAl1202741 US Skinner, Eric 21127306 BR
Ferrer, Wisberto US50102969 US Sloan, Leroy RA15421984 US
Gallagher, James C. RA12319444 US Smith, Charles M. RA13348375 US
Galvan, Miguel RA18225386 US Smith, Bennie D. RA14258149 US
Garza, Fred Jr. RA18353921 US Soto, Hipolito C. RA17259175 US
Gonzales, Marcos RA38249362 US Spencer, Edward F. 3654393 BR
Green, John Thomas 5620356 BR Spurr, Albert 327000 BR
Greer, Samuel H. 14457219 BR Stockting, Donald C. 14468948 BR
Hale, Norman S. RA14348647 US Stotts, Glenn E. RA16311269 US
Hall, Robert E. RA13349487 US Summers, Richard F. RA16307832 US
Hall, William H. RA15417953 US Taggart, Austin 14470450 BR
Hannaway, James 7014308 BR Taylor, Rafe M. RA18342382 US
Hart, Edward A. 5885496 BR Smith, William H. 5499706 BR
Heaney, William 2889823 BR Taylor, Wallace E. RA13308612 US
Henderson, Warren W RA33982567 US Teal, John F. RA11195965 US
Herbert, Edwin A. 19034958 BR Thomas, Nathaniel S. RA15297574 US
Hernandez, Roberto RA10406125 US Tolley, Kenneth R. 19041671 BR
Heslop, Jack 22432736 BR Ugto, Dionisio B. 504880 PI
Higa, Henry K. RA10103477 US Underwood, John RM8042 BR
Hinton, Edgar J. RA17275179 US Vanryn, Arie US51025470 US
Holland, Charles H. 4545784 BR Veneris, James G. ..RA13009671 US
Holmes, Thomas J. 14470172 BR Walker, John Jr. RA13344290 US
Hyun Sun Hwal Korean Ward, John G. RA14323840 US
Jackson, Theodore RA38416335 US Wells, John A RA18321209 US
Jackson, Thomas R RA15273544 US Welsh, Spencer W. RA13336088 US
Janda, Bohus J RA18319947 US West, Harrison. RA35935722 US
Jayroe, Johnnie R. RA18298298 US Whitaker, Charles L. RA15280639 US
Jennings, Lacey Jr. RA23961788 US White, Victor F. 22308872 BR
Johnson, Alfonzo S. ER35059444 US Whittaker, David. 22431499 BR
Johnson, Webster L RA13206774 US Wild, Norman 22248031 BR
Joyce, Kenneth J. H. 22332685 BR Williams, Peter F. 22243665 BR
Kaiser, Arthur L. RA13352001 US Wyatt, Robert L RA13270868 BR
Kekipi, Joseph G. US30122578 US Zapata, Cipriano D. PA508995 PI

STAFF OF "OPYMPIC ROUNDUP"
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Atkins, George R. RA15232355 US Fawcett, Eric 7893412 BR
Bajo, Emiliano RA6739596 US Ford, John E. RA15258642 US
Beadleson, Howard J. RA19334568 US Hickox, Robert H. RA12284788 US
Belhomme, Albert C. RA13296992 US Lucas, Donald 5773471 BR
Camden, William A. RA11187371 US Lyles, Edward H. 0-1186421 US
Chapman, Cyril H. 7893695 BR Pedicone, Henry A 0-1176760 US
Cocks, Ronald A. 6141695 BR Petersen, Richard A ER55003142 US
Copeland, Harry C. RA16313975 US Richie, Preston E RA38562869 US
Corner, Henry C. RA13250890 US Smith, William H. 5499706 BR
Covington, Clarence B. RA17016352 US Wright, Porches R RA34587249 US

PHOTOGRAPHERS
Belhomme, Albert C. RA13296992 Rush, Scott L. RA15277362 US
Katsaros, Steve ER57511273 Spurr, Albert 327000 BR

WORKING PERSONNEL
Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Adams, Howard G. RA3855626l US Ko Yu Yung Korean
Ahmet Yavuz 2665 Turkish Legue. Charles W. RA16267681 US
Allman, Donald G. 373024 BR Lessman, Billy J. USMCl152336 US
Ashpole, Robert D. RA37583922 US Lodge, Walter 926722 BR
Atkins, George R. RA15232355 US Mahir Acikgoz 1355 Turkish
Bartholomew, Jr. Stanley F RA13005857 US Martin, Wayne L. RA27010783 US
Biever, Arie 260425004 Hollander Massey, William 22202796 BR
Breton, Joseph E. 0-2002408 US McDonell, George F. 0-1296726 US
Buck, Donald P. 2/400000 Australian McKeown, John RA13344360 US
Bullock, James W. RA33057611 US McLaughlin, John N. 0-8433 US
Cookson, Art J. RA19241124 US McManus, Edward H. 6030907 BR
Crawford, Norman RA34909832 US McNally, John N. 22305359 BR
Curtis, John S. RA6361963 US Melesio, Joseph M. RA19327546 US
Dantzler, Earl US33861838 US Miller, Elmer L. RA17247675 US
Dartez, Linton J. RA38224652 US Miller, Loris R. AO-1908938 US
Davison, Joseph 14188143 BR Mills, Raymond E. RA16308822 US
Dawson, Thomas L. RA35826752 US Molitor, John A. RA45034493 US
Deweese, Jerry W. RA16292022 US Muldrow, Fred N. RA18351282 US
Dorsey, Marvin E. RA14334277 US Neal, Curtis M. RA34133960 US
Durham, Francis L. RA13275073 US Nordin, Cletys I. ER54040035 US
Edwards, Robert. RA14015159 US Ogario, Nicolas S. PA504949 PI
English, Edward. 6980243 BR Orteza, Dionisio US50000366 US
Esensten, Sidney 0-1766261 US Pak Sang Ho Korean
Ewan, Alexander 2754347 BR Pak Yong Nak Korean
Falconeiri, Donald L. RA11190182 US Patterson, Lewis J. RA17266828 US
Felix, Roger 1372 French Perry, Roscoe RA34406168 US
Figueroa, Victor RA12324321 US Peterson, Philip H. 0-1913224 US
Floyd Rothwell B. RA35673547 US Petrey, Clifford L. RA15257761 US
Fontaine, Joseph RAl1187760 US Prevost, Clement 1410 French
Freelon, Leo ER55002172 US Robertson, Alan B. ER18044168 US
Gallegos, Max G. RA19314110 US Shelley, Roy 6979731 BR
Garces, Albino RA18225243 US Shepherd, Raymond RA15378446 US
Garza, Fred Jr. RA18353921 US Sirk, Kenneth L. RA15272210 US
Greer, Samuel H. 14457219 BR Skipper, William J. RA14303169 US
Hannaway, James 7014308 BR Smith, Edward T. RA19314586 US
Hansen, William C. RA12320695 US Smith, William J. RA16291381 US
Harper, Archie G. RA19252451 US Smythe, James W. 14462559 BR
Havelock, George W. RA17003745 US Song Sam Suk Korean
Herbert, Edwin A. 19034958 BR Sortillo, Elliott RA13344251 US
Hill, Johnnie C. RA34856101 US Thomas, Nathaniel S. RA15297574 US
Hollis, Thomas H. J. 2/400311 Australian Tooley, Frank N. RA14369112 US
Holmquist,Richard A. RA37675134 US Tuggey, Norman H. 14183650 BR
Jackson, Ellis C. RA44154828 US Vance, Martin. 14412184 BR
Jayroe, Johnnie R. RA18298298 US Wickersham, Ollie B. ER39415704 US
Jones, Robert L.Jr ER14183333 US Williams, James C. 0-886899 US
Kim Jong Im Korean Williams, Johnny Jr. RA19326798 US
Kim Kwang Hoi Korean Woods, David RA17235679 US

CHEERING SECTION

Name Serial No. Nationality Name Serial No. Nationality
Beaupre, Jacque W. RA46041217 US Hyun Sun Hwal Korean
Benoit, Clifford E. RA11172601 US Katsaros, Steve ER57511273 US
Berchem, Nick RA16325097 US Kim Hyun Ja Korean
Brown, Harold T. RA12303213 US Kim Kwang Sun Korean
Carter, LeRoy Jr. RA16279986 US Kim Sang Chin Korean
Cho Ryun De Korean Ko Su Wan Korean
Crawford, Robert E. RA17248076 US Lumpkin, Billy M. RA19341940 US
Dahms, Lawrence P RA21194211 US McShan, Lawrence H. RA17274255 US
Davis, John A. RA12111630 US Megyesi, John J. RA13272345 US
Ginn, Robert A. RA14314815 US Meyers, Edwin R. RA16300766 US
Gray, Freddie H. RA14334315 US Pak Wun Yang Korean
Hammond, Glen D. RA12356656 US Ri Kwang Gun Korean
Harper, Fred. RA15378216 US Sin Che Pil Korean

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 26 Aug 2006 02:39

Deterance wrote:One source that I read said the fighting retreats by the Turkish Brigade in the mountains off of the main road gained time for the U.S. 2nd Infantry Division and allowed it to withdraw with out being completely overun by attacking Chinese.

Another book (cant remember the name) detailing the expereinces of a U.S. Infantry Company Commander named Torres cited an example of where Turkish forces with "mustaches, fixed bayonets and WWI style greatcoats" cleared ridges overlooking a vital road of Chinese blocking forces along with Torres' company. Other nearby U.S. Companies were to demoralized to clear the ridges.
*****************************************************************************************************************
Korean War: 1st Turkish Brigade's Baptism of Fire

Inexperienced but well trained and eager to show their mettle, the first Turkish troops arrived in Korea just in time to face the Chinese onslaught of November 1950.
By A.K. Starbuck



The Korean War, described by many, including then President Harry S. Truman, as a police action, marked the first time that the United States and the fledgling United Nations organization entered into a partnership to halt the advance of the Cold War into the Far East.
A total of 22 nations agreed to send either troops or medical units. Sixteen countries responded to the U.N. resolution by sending troops to halt the invasion of South Korea by the North Koreans. One of the first of the major participants to send a brigade was Turkey. The first Turkish contingent arrived on October 19, 1950, and in varying strengths remained until midsummer 1954.
Initially, Turkey sent the 1st Turkish Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. Tahsin Yazici. The brigade consisted of three battalions commanded by Major Imadettin Kuranel, Major Mithat Ulunu, and Major Lutfu Bilgon. The Turkish Armed Forces Command (TAFC) was a regimental combat team with three infantry battalions, along with supporting artillery and engineers. It was the only brigade-sized UN unit attached permanently to a U.S. division throughout the Korean War.
More than 5,000 men of the 1st Turkish Brigade, including liaison and the advance party, arrived in Pusan, South Korea, on October 17 from the eastern Mediterranean port of Iskenderun, Turkey. The brigade unloaded from their ship and proceeded to the newly opened U.N. reception center located just outside of Taegu. The bulk of the enlisted men were from small towns and villages in the mountains of eastern Turkey. For these volunteer officers and volunteer enlisted men who were just completing their compulsory two year service, it was not only the first time that they had left their native country--it was the first time they had been out of the villages of their birth. It was, at least for the enlisted men, the first time that they had encountered non-Muslims. Vast cultural and religious differences existed between the Turks and the Americans.
Their commander, General Yazici, was an aging brigadier who had been a division commander fighting the British at Gallipoli in 1916. He was highly regarded in the Turkish military establishment and willingly stepped down a rank in order to command the first contingent of Turks in Korea. He had only one drawback--no real command of English--yet he was attached to an American division. Later, that lack of language proficiency would prove to be a major hindrance to his understanding of orders and troop deployments.
The U.S. Army command was unaware of the difficulties in coordination, logistics and, above all, basic communication in a common language that would complicate orders and troop movements, especially in the crucial early months of their joint exercises. Unfamiliar food, clothing requirements and transportation would come to create more problems than the American high command had counted on. The dietary requirements of the Turks forbade pork products, and the American rations definitely contained pork products forbidden to all Muslims. A Japanese food processor was hired to provide rations that met the Turkish requirements. Bread and coffee presented other problems. The Turks favored a heavy, substantial bread containing nonbleached flour along with thick, strong, heavily sweetened coffee. The U.S. Army found a way to satisfy these needs along with those of the other Allied forces.
Few American liaison officers were attached to the Turkish companies, thereby adding to the problems the Turks faced in their initial combat operations. Misinterpretation of orders resulted from the lack of communication between Allies. The problem, at first overlooked and judged to be only minor, only became exacerbated in the heat of battle.
The Turks' arrival in Korea garnered a considerable amount of publicity. The Turkish soldiers' fierce appearance, flowing mustaches and great knives were a war correspondent's dream come true. Although they had not fought in a major conflict since World War I, the Turkish soldiers had the reputation of being rough, hard fighters who preferred the offensive position and gave no quarter in battle. Most of the enlisted men were young and carried a sidearm sword that, to Americans and the other U.N. troops, appeared to be a long knife. No other U.N. troops were armed with that kind of knife, or indeed any other weapon out of the ordinary. The Turks had a dangerous proficiency in close combat with their long knives that made all other Allied forces want to stay clear of them.
Most of the enlisted men were from the eastern steppe region of Turkey near the Russian border and had little more than three or four years of basic schooling. In the conscription process, they were given uniforms, plus some training by the Turkish military and their U.S. military advisers. Life in their native villages had been largely unchanged for hundreds of years. A central village well still provided water, and news of the outside world seldom penetrated village daily life.
It was to that patchwork U.N. army, composed mainly of Americans but having diverse units from 16 other countries, that the orders suddenly came to General Walton "Johnnie" Walker's Eighth Army headquarters to mount a massive offensive and push for an early end to the war. General Douglas MacArthur's promise to relieve two divisions and have "the boys home for Christmas" gave the impetus to an ill-conceived move to the Yalu River. There were some expressed misgivings, especially by the Eighth Army commander, General Walker. Those objections, however, were quickly pushed aside by the clique that surrounded MacArthur. Pressure to conclude the war in one massive offensive became too difficult to contain. The generals and commanders in the field who would actually commit their men to one of the bloodiest campaigns of the war were protesting voices that were either never acknowledged or ignored.
Intelligence reports given to MacArthur indicated the presence and capture of Chinese troops in late October and early November. Major General Willoughby, MacArthur's intelligence chief, kept him abreast of all incoming reports of larger numbers of Chinese troop movements. Nonetheless, the die was cast for Walker's Eighth Army. Walker tried several times to delay the inevitable by protesting the lack of logistical support and supplies that were en route from Japan and the United States, but all he accomplished was to increase MacArthur's ire toward him and impatience at the delay.
Bitter winds from Manchuria churned over the steep, granitic mountains and treacherous valleys of North Korea. The coldest weather in at least 40 years gripped the land. Numbed and miserable soldiers tried to keep warm around makeshift fires made in empty 50-gallon drums. Medical units began treating their first cases of frostbite. More and more, Korea became the proverbial "Hell froze over." It was necessary to mix alcohol with the gasoline to prevent gas lines from freezing in the vehicles and equipment. Blood plasma had to be heated for 90 minutes before it could be used. Medicines that were water-soluble froze, and sweat that accumulated in the soldiers' boots froze during the night. The terrain of northern Korea, with its long v-shaped valleys, high craggy mountain ridges and the lack of any real discernible roads, along with the incredible numbing cold sweeping across the forward-moving army, contributed the elements of tragedy that shaped the battle to come.
The U.S. Army's 7th Division and other units were not prepared for arctic warfare. Few of the fighting units had arctic parkas. Yet they were ordered forward. On November 21, they were ordered to move across a riverbed containing what they had been told would be only ankle-deep water that would present no problem. The night before, however, upstream dams had been opened and the water released. The soldiers waded into frigid, waist-deep water with chunks of ice floating in it. After several unsuccessful attempts, the crossing was called off. Eighteen men suffered severe frostbite and had to have their frozen uniforms cut off.
During the dogged advance, Walker's army became more thinly stretched as the Korean Peninsula widened and forced the army to cover more territory as it moved steadily northward. His order of battle was comprised of the U.S. I Corps, consisting of the U.S. 24th Division, the British 27th Brigade, and the Republic of Korea (ROK) 1st Division; the U.S. IX Corps including the U.S. 2nd and 25th Divisions and the 1st Turkish Brigade; the ROK 6th, 7th, and 8th divisions; and the 1st Cavalry Division in Army reserve.
Walker was cautious about committing his troops. Intelligence tried to get some realistic estimates about the Chinese troop strength and their movements. Daily briefings in early November indicated a dramatic increase in Chinese and North Korean troop strength from 40,100 to 98,400 men. These estimates still were woefully inadequate.
Assembled in front of Walker's IX Corps in the west was the XIII Army Group of the Chinese Fourth Field Army, consisting of 18 infantry divisions totaling at least 180,000 men. Opposing the U.S. I Corps in the east was the IX Army Group of the Chinese Third Field Army with 12 infantry divisions of about 120,000 men. The total Chinese strength was about 300,000 men; 12 divisions of the North Korean Peoples Army added approximately 65,000 men to the enemy strength. The North Korean soldiers had recovered sufficiently from their earlier reverses at the hands of the Americans to be judged by their commanders to be battle worthy. Added to that array were about 40,000 guerrillas operating behind the U.N. lines. Enemy strength was more than slightly underestimated.
The Chinese army had managed to move a vast number of troops by the most primitive means. Using animals and their own backs to transport supplies, they were not restricted to the primitive roads. They moved overland without the benefit of trucks or other mechanized equipment and therefore had the advantage of greater mobility. The United Nations, on the other hand, stuck with basic roads and improving existing roads to move men and equipment. Engineering companies moved ahead, trying to make roads passable for tanks and trucks.
Another difference that was to count very highly against the United Nations and the United States was adherence to routine, World War II thinking and tactics. Chinese used soldiers were expected to carry on their backs all the food each soldier required for at least six days. The food was cooked rice and soybean curds in concentrated form as well as similar items that required no cooking or heating in order to be eaten. Recovered diaries of the Chinese soldiers recount their pangs of hunger from these severely restricted rations, but they achieved their objective in the same bitter cold and biting winds and over the same terrain that handicapped their U.N. opponents.
The Chinese generally marched at night and averaged at least 18 miles per day for approximately 18 days. In the daylight hours, they concealed themselves in the rough, mountainous terrain. The only daylight movement allowed was by scouting parties. Restrictions were so onerous that officers were authorized to shoot to kill any soldier who violated the order for concealment. Many of the Chinese movement tactics were similar to those used by Napoleon Bonaparte a century and a half earlier.
On November 19, the U.S. 25th Division left Kaesong at 6 a.m. and bedded down at the mining town of Kunu-ri around 2 o'clock that night. The next day, the Turkish Brigade, which was largely an infantry unit without trucks for troop transport, was detached and reassigned to the IX Corps reserve at Kunu-ri. Walker's Eighth Army command was split down the middle by the Chongchon River.
As part of the IX Corps' general northward advance, the Turks were ordered on November 21 to move north with the 25th Division. By November 22, 1950, the Turks had completed their assignment of neutralizing North Korean patrols in their assigned area. The steady movement to Kunu-ri had begun in earnest. Kunu-ri, much like all the other small villages in the northern sector, was mainly mud-and-stick houses. It was a totally unremarkable place, little different from any of the other villages perched on the mountainsides and in the deep valleys cut by swift-moving mountain rivers and streams.
Advancing along with their American counterparts, the Turks were ordered to establish contact with the U.S. 2nd Division on the right flank of the IX Corps and also to cover the right flank and rear of their division. The brigade had received information concerning a Chinese regiment known to be northwest of Tokchon. General Yazici described the situation that confronted him in these words:
"This was what the order was. Further intelligence was asked about the enemy and the ROK Corps, but none was available or more information was not supplied lest it lower the morale of the Turkish Brigade....The situation was serious, and demanded prompt action."
On November 26, the Chinese Communist Forces (CCF) launched strong counterattacks against the U.S. I Corps and IX Corps. The main Chinese force moved down the central mountain ranges against the ROK II Corps at Tokchon. The South Koreans could not withstand the attack and their defenses collapsed.
The Chinese onslaught assumed alarming proportions, and the Turks were ordered to protect the U.N. right flank. Trucks were assigned to transport the Turks' 1st Battalion to Wawon, 15 miles east of Kunu-ri, about halfway to Takchon, unload and return for the 2nd Battalion. After insufficient trucks arrived, some of the brigade set out on foot. Orders, counterorders and garbled transmissions made the situation an unintelligible mess. The Turks were ordered to close the road and secure Unsong-ni. Trying later to explain the confusion of that time, General Yazici wrote:
"There was no time to move the brigade to Unsong-ni and deploy it there before dark. Besides, the enemy, which was supposed to be at Chongsong-ni, was in fact too close to the line which the Corps wanted us to hold. That the Brigade might be subjected to a surprise attack before reaching its position was highly probable. Even more important was the fact that the civilian population had not been moved out of the area. If the peasants and the guerrillas that might have been infiltrated among them attempted to block the mountain crossing or the Wawon Pass in the rear, the Brigade might suffer heavily. As a matter of fact, the 2nd Division, of which we were supposed to defend the right flank, was withdrawing. It was impossible to fulfill the task from Karil L'yong, where the Brigade was, because the terrain was very rugged and thickly wooded. In order to protect the Kunu-riTokchon road and the other roads to the north and the south, a 12-mile-wide front had to be held. This was impossible against a numerically superior enemy who knew the region well. Further, the terrain restricted the effective use of artillery and heavy infantry weapons."
As Yazici clearly outlined, the Turks were in an unenviable situation. They had to withdraw to the southeast. That withdrawal compounded the exposure of the Turks' own east flank as well as the 2nd Division's east flank. Yazici ordered his men to move in the direction of Wawon northeast of Kunu-ri. The brigade had lost contact with corps. Therefore, Yazici assumed responsibility and ordered his men to position themselves at Wawon. When they reached Wawon, they attacked toward Tokchon, on foot and without tank support. The terrain was upstream along the Tongjukkyo River into the mountain divide that separated the Chongchon River from the Taedong drainage. Here, the headwaters of the Tongjukkyo River fan out into numerous small streams.
When he received intelligence that air observers had seen hundreds of Chinese moving toward Tokchon, Maj. Gen. Laurence Kaiser, commanding the U.S. 2nd Division, remarked, "That's where they are going to hit." The Chinese counteroffensive actually struck all along the front. Two platoons of the Turkish Brigade assigned reconnaissance duty were now given rear-guard duty. The Chinese followed the brigade closely. The reconnaissance unit engaged the oncoming Chinese at the Karil L'yong Pass, was unable to break contact. Only a few men survived.
The Turks had achieved one objective--they had tied down the enemy. The Chinese suffered heavy casualties trying repeatedly to take the Turkish position, and all their attacks were repelled. Finally, Yazici, understanding that the brigade was being encircled by the numerically superior Chinese, ordered withdrawal. The Turks were isolated in the subzero temperatures, their orders not fully understood. And during the night, the Chinese kept up a steady barrage of sudden noises using drums, bugles, whistles, flutes, shepherds' pipes and cymbals, along with the shouting, laughing and chattering of human voices.
The offensive had changed and now became a rout of the U.N. forces. The engulfing enemy constantly changed tactics and directions.. Communications resumed with the Turkish Brigade. Some orders were understood, but most were not. The brigade was ordered to merge with the U.S. 38th Regiment, cover the 38th's flank and secure a retreat route westward. In the confusion of the retreat and the garbled, misdirected and delayed messages, that crucial directive was two hours late in delivery. The column got turned about in the mass confusion and congestion of the road.
Once again, as the Turks approached Wawon, they encountered heavy enemy fire. The CCF had arrived before the Turks were able to reassemble and assume defensive positions. The Chinese ripped into the ragged column and the soldiers were ordered to turn about once again. The Turkish 9th Company took the brunt of the attack as it covered for the retreating main body. The 10th Company of the brigade's 3rd Battalion received orders to form the brigade's general outpost line.
Major Lutfu Bilgin, commander of the 3rd Battalion, sent his 9th Company to defend the 10th and 11th companies' flank. The Chinese eased off on the 10th but continued to besiege the 9th and the 11th. Midmorning on November 28, the Chinese broke through and attacked the 9th's position in force. The company was overrun, and Major Bilgin and many of his men were killed.
Enemy reinforcements tried to encircle the entire brigade. General Yazici, however, assessed the situation and took steps to protect his flank and avoid encirclement. The CCF poured forward, and the Turks were caught in the trap that the Chinese were laying. Suddenly, the Chinese broke off after encountering strong resistance of the 3rd Battalion.
During the withdrawal, the Chinese had attacked the Turks with overwhelming force and the brigade took such high casualties that by November 30 it was destroyed as a battleworthy unit. The only support the Turks received from IX Corps was a tank platoon and truck transportation. That was added to the brigade's artillery and enabled some of the brigade to survive.
The flow of messages and changed orders to the Turks on the road to Tokchon on November 27 reflected the lack of precise information and the high level of uncertainty that IX Corps and the Eighth Army experienced as they struggled to interpret the rapidly enfolding events. One certainty was that, during the day, the Chinese attacked the leading 1st Battalion at Wawon and this ambush inflicted the devastating blow to the Turks. The battalion was surrounded, and a hand-to-hand battle between Chinese bayonets and Turkish long knives took place. It was reported that the two companies of Turks were still fighting east of Wawaon and had about 400 men wounded. General Yazici was at his headquarters in Taechon, a larger village southeast of Kunu-ri. The Turks held out at Wawon until the afternoon and then withdrew to another position southwest of Wawon. Again, the Chinese outflanked those Turks, who then withdrew toward Kunu-ri. The Turkish battalion lost most of its vehicles. The survivors scrambled into the hills when all other means of escape was denied them. By that time, the Chinese held all the roads. The Turks continued to fight delaying actions to gain time for the rest of their troops to re-form and establish some semblance of an orderly defense, but they were not successful in any of those efforts
At the 2nd Division Headquarters, information about the Turks and their actual movements was more and more difficult to obtain. The tanks sent toward the Turks' position were repeatedly turned back. Confusion led to startling events, such as American soldiers simply abandoning their positions and equipment, including their weapons.
The Chinese appeared to be everywhere and nowhere at the same time. Confirmation of Chinese movements was sparse and often erroneous. The Chinese, reported to be just ahead, turned out to be advancing on the soldiers from behind. The Turks decided to evacuate the command post. A new and yet ancient style of warfare had begun.
The Chinese and North Koreans used a multiple of tactics in a mountainous terrain that left little, if any, mobility. The weather had become an enemy as cruel as the terrain. The Turks and Americans, unable to communicate and coordinate, fought valiantly, but without much direction and without knowing what their fellow soldiers and units were doing.
The U.N. response to the Chinese offensive in November 1950 has been described as a "bugout," a massive retreat that should not have happened. Very little has been written about the conditions that contributed to the failure of MacArthur's November offensive, an offensive that began with high expectations of bringing the soldiers home for Christmas. Afterward, the words "home for Christmas" rang hollow in the ears of both the military and the politicians. The terrain, the weather, the lack of adequate language skills by the Americans and the Turks, and the lack of options for that massive an operation preordained the bloody, tragic outcome.
In the course of the U.N. offensive and the Chinese counteroffensive, the 1st Turkish Brigade suffered 3,514 casualties, of which 741 were killed in action, 2,068 wounded, 163 missing and 244 taken prisoner, as well as 298 noncombatant casualties.
The Turks, armed and trained by American military advisers, did better than even they had hoped or expected in this, their first real combat since World War I. The American units to which they were attached respected their skills and tenacity in combat. Some comments by American officers give insight into the Turks and their abilities. "They really prefer to be on the offensive and handle it quite well," went one appraisal. "They are not as good at defensive positions, and certainly never retreat." Another report told of their patrol skills: "Certain Turkish patrols always reported high body counts when they returned from patrols. Headquarters always scoffed at the high numbers, much higher in fact than any other unit, until the Turks decided to bring the enemy bodies back and dump them at headquarters for the body count."
The Turks acquitted themselves in a brave and noble fashion in some of the worst conditions experienced in the Korean War. Very little else could have been required or expected of them. Their heavy casualties speak of their honor and commitment. Their bravery requires no embellishment. It stands on its own.
This article was written by A.K. Starbuck and originally published in the December 1997 issue of Military History magazine.

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 26 Aug 2006 03:05

Above topic mentioned Turk Long Knives were Turco&Russo war veteran US Provencial Tools made<< Martini Peabody breach loader riffle>> Yatagan type special Ottoman contract bayonets< much later the Republic early years Turks modified<< Turked or Turkified>> those bayonets among other Ottoman issued -used or captured almost any type of Allied firearms and edge weapons

M 1871 US Martini Peabody bayonet modified as dismounted outer leaf spring and barrel fetcher knobs ,newlt made wooden grips instead of prety checkered pressed leather hilts and uniqe historical leather ceremonial scabbards replaced with WWI captured French Chassepot type Yatagan sabres whole metal sheat.

Belive or not still todays Modern Turk Army main boot camp 4 months basic training esential is Bayoneting!!!and they do not call this Hand to Hand combat but Chest to Chest

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Post by Tosun Saral » 26 Aug 2006 08:38

Turkish Infantry afixed bayonets in trenches ready to attack the Greeks during the War of Independance in 1919-22.
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Post by Andy H » 26 Aug 2006 15:50

Thank you all for the gamut of information that has been provided within this thread.

Just a polite reminder that this thread will stay focused on the Turkish Brigades involvement in the Korean War

Regards to all

Andy H

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Post by Kim Sung » 26 Aug 2006 17:56

Chavusch wrote:Ignoring the evidence on the theory that telling the same lie often enough will make most people believe it, the communists continually attempted to portray the "People's Republic" as a paradise. Among the lesser known communist propaganda efforts was an attempt to use the POWs in an "Olympics" (November 15-27, 1952) to pretend that these pathetic, vulnerable, defenseless human beings were actually well treated, living and enjoying healthy activities in a communist wonderland.
POW Inter-Camp Olympics booklet of 1952
This is entirely a new information. Thank you. [/quote]

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Post by Chavusch » 31 Aug 2006 08:56

blackley wrote:Tosun Saral
Would you know the address or email contact for the Turkish Armed Forces General Staff in Ankara? I will be visiting Turkey and North Cyprus to launch and promote the Turkish version my 440-page novel "Love and Death in Cyprus" in September. I have not been able to find any English version books about the Turkish Brigade in Korea. I look forward to meeting you and others in Istanbul on my visit.
Regards
Harry Blackley
http://www.lovedeathcyprus.com
The real good one from prof doc. Mim Kemal Oke`s << chronology of forgottan war korea and Turkish brigade < publisher is Tekfen yayincilik> best old books and in Eng ofcourse u can dig and could found in Istanbul , Beyoglu section , Denizler kitapevi< Kitapevi means book store.



Good luck

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 31 Aug 2006 09:22

Andy H wrote:Thank you all for the gamut of information that has been provided within this thread.

Just a polite reminder that this thread will stay focused on the Turkish Brigades involvement in the Korean War

Regards to all

Andy H
Dear Andy ,,oops sir permisson to speak sir :roll:

Tosun abi right, he just attached pics. that topic mentioned Brigades fierce long knives those pictured Turkish bayonets from WWI Mauser 98/05 butcher blade know types , but Turkish brigades long knives was US made much older type Martini Peabody Yatagan types and it was imposibel to attach the barrel of the M1 garands and /or Turk type Mausers, it was just modified to side arm use.

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Post by Chavusch » 31 Aug 2006 09:31

Anybody knows that in Kunuri battles Turkish major order to shoot from behind as COWARDS whom trying to escape << deserted >>their defencive valued posted w/o any command or order , Turkish 2nd Recon battalions 3rd company killed 13 of them this cowards..inluding one captain!!

After this georgous incident Comander Gen Tahsin Yazici never gave his brave mans to UN marshal court and defend them .

In Turkish unwritten code of battle ...who runs away they can be shoot only behind!

So be careful if u r once in Turk section and u r fighting side by side with them , never try to runn off!!

Q....... who r they?

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Post by Chavusch » 31 Aug 2006 10:03

Kim Sung wrote:
Chavusch wrote:Ignoring the evidence on the theory that telling the same lie often enough will make most people believe it, the communists continually attempted to portray the "People's Republic" as a paradise. Among the lesser known communist propaganda efforts was an attempt to use the POWs in an "Olympics" (November 15-27, 1952) to pretend that these pathetic, vulnerable, defenseless human beings were actually well treated, living and enjoying healthy activities in a communist wonderland.
POW Inter-Camp Olympics booklet of 1952
This is entirely a new information. Thank you.
[/quote]

Dear Kardesh< we called Brave Koreans as Brother>

In hard combat Turks always wish their flanks rather than other units..so Korean worriers, and called them kardesh < brother>

Wrestling is Turkish -Turkic Mongolian < white Mongols> national sport as all we can read that POW Olimpic listing, Turks were mostly in the ring.

*****************************************************************************************************************
The Wrestling Turks and American Military Morale in the Korean War



by Don Miller




The summer of 1996 found me for the first time in Turkey. My destination was Edirne, a city near the Bulgarian border which served as the capital of the Ottoman Empire until Christian Constantinople fell to the Turks in 1453.Edirne is the site of the oldest continuing athletic event in the world. Almost annually since 1640 hordes of Turkey's finest athletes have gathered there for the Kirkpinar, the world series of Turkish oil wrestling. Hardly any tourists attend the tournament, and almost no Americans. Why did I go? Because of a book I read in 1957.

My status as a college student, from 1950 to 1954, kept me deferred from the draft thruout the Korean War, and I have always felt some shame that I was spared when so many young men my age died in Korea. In 1957 I completed graduate school, the year that Eugene Kinkead published his deeply disturbing account of the mortality rate of American prisoners-of-war who were incarcerated by the North Koreans. The Russians, having developed the science of brain-washing, had taught it to the Chinese, who passed it on to the North Koreans, who found that American prisoners were ideal targets for psychological manipulation. Never before - or since - were American soldiers shown to be so widely susceptible to demoralization.

A study conducted by the U.S. Army Medical Corps after the war found that one-third of American POWs were guilty to some degree of collaboration with the enemy. In the three years of warfare, not a single one escaped from captivity. Most alarming of all, out of 7,190 captives, the death rate was 38%, or 2,730. One out of three never came home. These statistics far exceeded the rate for any other American war. Nine enlisted men and three officers were later convicted by courts martial. The most notorious was a Sgt. James Gallagher, who murdered three barracks-mates, helpless with dysentery, by kicking them out into the snow to freeze in the dead of winter.

The study revealed that neither physical torture nor lack of food or medical care had caused the general collapse in morale. Once captured, many of our men lost all sense of allegiance to their country or to one another. They refused to obey their own officers, cursing and even striking them, buying into their captors propaganda that capitalistic rank no longer existed. On forced marches from one prison camp to another, able-bodied men would refuse to lift the stretchers of the wounded. The strong regularly took food from the weak, and the sick were ignored . . . or worse. Many prisoners simply withdrew into a state of isolation and inactivity.

Our commissioned officers had been segregated out by the North Koreans, but each compound still had senior non-coms who, had they established order, would have prevented the tragedy. Instead, the men - chiefly the young - were left free to become easy prey to their captors. Death came most often from what Army psychiatrists simply termed "give-up-itis." First the sufferer became despondent, later he lay down and covered his head with a blanket, then he wanted ice water with his food, next only ice water, and if noone managed to break thru, he was dead in three weeks.

The greatest number of North Korea's prisoners was, of course, American. Of the twelve nations represented, however, the third most numerous were the Turks, with 229. The U.S. Army study found them to have been just as exemplary in prison as they were in battle. The Turks' secret weapons were discipline, great pride in their brigade, and an unbroken chain of command. The final official report contains this Turkish officer's account of his prison experience:
"I told the Chinese commander of the camp that I was in charge of my group. If he wanted anything done, he was to come to me, and I would see that it was done. If he removed me, the responsibility would fall not on him but on the man next below me, and after that on the man below him. And so on, down thru the ranks, until there were only two privates left. Then the senior private would be in charge. They could kill us, I told him, but they couldn't make us do what we didn't want to do. Discipline was our salvation, and we all knew it. If a Turk had questioned an order from his superior to share his food or lift a [stretcher], the way I understand some of your men did, he would literally have had his teeth knocked in. Not by his superior, either, but by the Turk nearest to him. The Communists made attempts to indoctrinate [us]. . .but they failed completely, and eventually gave up."

The crowning consequence of this discipline was that, although half of the 229 were wounded when captured, not one died in prison. When a Turk got sick, the rest nursed him to health. If he was ordered to the hospital, two well Turks went along to minister to him hand and foot and to carry him back to the compound when he was discharged. At mealtime two Turks were dispatched to carry the food back, and it was divided equally down to the last morsel. There was no hogging, no rule of dog eat dog, not ever. Death by "give-up-itis" was impossible. While an American might curl up alone at night and die in the bitter cold, the Turks all piled together in one corner of their cell, and every hour the two on the outside would rotate to the center of the pile. The Chinese guards actually grew to fear their Turkish prisoners, as they watched the interminable wrestling matches which kept them so tough - and, paradoxically, so loyal to one another. As a consequence of this study President Eisenhower issued the now-famous Uniform Code of Military Conduct, and the Korean experience, thank God, has not repeated itself.

That was how, forty years ago, a book on the Korean War "hooked" me on Turkey. My admiration was not then easy to admit, for I was a newly-minted Anglican priest and these Turks were all misguided Moslems. I had emerged from seminary equipped with my own fix on all the non-Christian religions, and Moslems were fanatics who just wanted to kill everybody else. Here I was, faced with evidence of Moslems who really lived the Golden Rule, and of Christians whose self-absorption had produced despair and death. I kept chewing on that paradox - and those stereotypes - until finally a chance came to do some observation for myself.

Four times now I have visited Turkey, to see what kind of wrestlers the Turks are and, more importantly, what kind of people they are. So impressed was I by the Kirkpinar Festival, and the hundreds of athletes, officials and dignitaries with whom I had my halting conversations, that I kept coming back. These are guileless, friendly, physically awesome men who come from every province of a big country just to wrestle, forty at a time, in a great grassy field, barefoot and barechested, covered with olive oil, in 92-degree summer heat. These fighters range in age from twelve to forty, and each contest may last from a few minutes to an hour. I find it hard to imagine many of our own wrestlers matching their stamina, or to be competing in such a gruelling sport at the age of forty. The Turkish style with its dearth of rules could not easily be introduced into our country, because the brotherly trust which exists between the combatants is unknown in rule-rich American sports. There are referees, but their involvement is minimal. Turks oiled bodies are so difficult to grasp that, in seeking to secure leverage for a throw, a wrestler is permitted to thrust his hand or his entire forearm down into his opponent's leather trousers, something which would freak out any Western athlete. Intentional fouls are almost non-existent. There is no such thing as a draw, the match continuing until one wins and the other loses.

A most impressive aspect of the tournament is the participants almost universal comradeliness. Opponents will kibitz and joke with one another while waiting for their line to be sent onto the field. Before tying up for this fight to the finish each pair engages in elaborate Islamic rituals of respect for one another. If during the match one wrestler should get something in his eye the struggle simply pauses, his opponent usually fetches cloth and water to wash it away, then they face off, and the fight is resumed. Once the match is decided they rise to embrace, touch foreheads together and leave the field. A foreign observer must ask how much these deeply-ingrained wrestling traditions contribute to the fact that Turks historically stick together in tough situations, while we Americans seem often inclined to "look out for Number One.

When the three-day tournament draws to a close, and the champions have been cheered by a packed stadium, the President of Turkey crowns the Bash Pehlivan of all Turkey, a national hero frequently honored by his home town with a statue. The current Turkish champion, whom I am privileged to consider a friend, is also a champion Sumo wrestler in Japan. Almost forty, but in extraordinary shape, he confesses to a longing to take up American football.

Fellow Americans, we have a lot to learn from the Turks and the way their wrestlers treat one another even when they are fighting. We must go on struggling to love and care for one another despite the immense racial, ethnic and religious differences which characterize American culture. If we fail, then the individualism of which we proudly boast will be our undoing at the hand of some other power whose people have learned to stick together for the common good. Jesus, as always, hit the mark when he said, "Greater love hath no man, than that he lay down his life for his friends." It is simply not enough that we be cajoled to celebrate our diversity, which is no more than a glib piece of contemporary sloganeering. Americans will either become genuine brothers, bound together by a compassion which transcends mere tolerance, or this first great world experiment in democracy is destined to fade and crumble.

Turkish Wrestling.



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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 31 Aug 2006 10:50

Tolga Alkan wrote:I'm going to post some photographs of the Turkish Brigade here.All photographs coming from the photo album of Turkish Defence Magazine.
Sory Tolga but 3rd Platoon, 15th company...this pics show much later date of Korean conflict ,in my opinion the p[ic. taken by circa late 50`s< 57-59 or 60`s. that was Turkish troops was Battalion size.

Regards

Tosun Saral
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Post by Tosun Saral » 31 Aug 2006 16:52

The page of Ahmet Gokceli, A Turkish Korean War veteran. He was borned in old Turkish town of Provadi in Bulgaria in 1928. His family imigrate to Turkey in 1938. He enlisted to the army and sended to Korea with the 1st Turkish Brigade in 1950. He got 3 madals for his bravery.
http://images.google.com.tr/imgres?imgu ... tr%26lr%3D

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Mehmet Fatih
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Post by Mehmet Fatih » 01 Sep 2006 22:30

Initially, Turkey sent the 1st Turkish Brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. Tahsin Yazici. The brigade consisted of three battalions commanded by Major Imadettin Kuranel, Major Mithat Ulunu, and Major Lutfu Bilgon.
Just a few spelling corrections of the names of those two heroes who were fallen in Korea.

They are Miktat Uluünlü and Lütfü Bilgin.

Both of them may rest in peace...

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 01 Sep 2006 23:07

About Birigades traning and deport to Pusan days , from rare English written source Prof. Dr. Mim Kemal Oke.

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 454#947454


http://forum.axishistory.com/posting.ph ... e&p=947454

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Chavusch
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Post by Chavusch » 01 Sep 2006 23:28

Tolga Alkan wrote:I'm going to post some photographs of the Turkish Brigade here.All photographs coming from the photo album of Turkish Defence Magazine.
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 517#772517

Uper posed is not Turk soldier bu Turk fan American GI < check his patch..> , pic taken by other guy while he was visiting nearbay Turkish MP company in late 50s I do not remember yet but he got his own web page , I`ll try to fetch to sent here

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