Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

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unsam
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Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby unsam » 24 Mar 2010 10:45

I know that for this period
In total was lost 661 Lottas

64 Lottas were lost from actions of the opponent. 4 Lottas were missing.

And where to esteem in detail? Their names. How they were lost?

They Are killed from a bullet directly or from a shell splinter.

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Mangrove » 24 Mar 2010 11:26

unsam wrote:And where to esteem in detail? Their names. How they were lost? They Are killed from a bullet directly or from a shell splinter.


I suspect most of the combat casualties were from aerial bombs and only few from bullets. A while ago I listed all Lotta casualties from http://kronos.narc.fi/menehtyneet/ from 30.11.1939 to 21.2.1940 and I found 15 Lottas. All had died in bombings or in accidents.

For example AALTONEN, Lilja Pauliina died on January 29th 1940 at Turku in an aerial bombing.

unsam
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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby unsam » 24 Mar 2010 11:56

I do not understand anyway
Here an example.
lotta AHLHOLM VILMA HELENA 07.04.1944 menehtymisluokka - kuoli
How she died. From what was lost. Illness, accident, killed?
There is evidence of the kill Lottas directly?

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Mangrove » 24 Mar 2010 13:18

unsam wrote:lotta AHLHOLM VILMA HELENA 07.04.1944 menehtymisluokka - kuoli
How she died. From what was lost. Illness, accident, killed?


It's unknown. Her post was at Lin.RP 335 or Linnoitusrakennuspataljoona 335 but he died at 43.SotaS, 43rd Military Hospital. The unit diaries do no mention any unsual for the day or few days before. Could be an illness or a single accident. The complete records of the Lotta Svärd are preserved at the Finnish National Archive.

unsam wrote:There is evidence of the kill Lottas directly?


Well, let's say I'm not surprised if there were casualties from Soviet small arms but I'm surprised if these casualties were more than 5-10% of all Lotta casualties.

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Slava_M » 24 Mar 2010 13:38

MIA cases are interesting - such cases possibly from Soviet (more or less) small arms in the frontline. I suppose it is difficult to miss from the field hospital in rear areas.

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby unsam » 24 Mar 2010 13:43

So the movie "LUPAUS" 2005 - Fairy Tale (fiction)
There (in the film)1 Lotta killed bayonet, 1 Lotta killed bullet
1 Lotte was taken prisoner.
And really? Lottas were in captivity?

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Mangrove » 24 Mar 2010 15:07

unsam wrote:So the movie "LUPAUS" 2005 - Fairy Tale (fiction)


It's a [fictional] movie.

unsam wrote:1 Lotte was taken prisoner. And really? Lottas were in captivity?


Here's a translation of a Soviet document conserning Lotta Raisa Asela. She was captured by a group of partisans at village of Konda (Klimetski Island). The original can be (I think) found on the book "Rukiver! Suomalaiset sotavangit Neuvostoliitossa."

http://yle.fi/dokumentti/sotavangit/raisa_asela_poytakirja.htm

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Juha Tompuri » 24 Mar 2010 19:55

Martti Kujansuu wrote:
unsam wrote:1 Lotte was taken prisoner. And really? Lottas were in captivity?


Here's a translation of a Soviet document conserning Lotta Raisa Asela. She was captured by a group of partisans at village of Konda (Klimetski Island). The original can be (I think) found on the book "Rukiver! Suomalaiset sotavangit Neuvostoliitossa."

http://yle.fi/dokumentti/sotavangit/raisa_asela_poytakirja.htm
To be exact, Raisa Asela was not a Lotta, but a canteen worker, at coastal defences Soldiers’ Home Organisation (Sotilaskotiliitto)
She being not the only victim of the Soldiers’ Home Organisation:
viewtopic.php?f=59&t=70091&p=721575&hilit#p721575

unsam wrote:And really? Lottas were in captivity?

Liisa Uurasmaa being the first one (here by mistake mentioned as KIA) captured at Kalastajansaarento/Poluostrov Rybatši
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 63,00.html

unsam wrote:There is evidence of the kill Lottas directly?
Sirkka Korhonen is mentioned to have been bayonetted to death by a Soviet partisan 8th July 1942.
The photo here is from her funeral 17th July 1942.
Source: Suomen Lotat by Vilho Lukkarinen.
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unsam
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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby unsam » 27 Mar 2010 07:31

Thank you very much!
Do you have information about the captured Lottas?

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Lotvonen » 20 Feb 2017 08:35

Translation of the text above (it will be referenced to in another topic one of these days)

Extract from the letter of Ms. Siiri Lehtimäki, the liaison Lotta of 14.D. to Lotta Svärd organization:
On 8. July 1942 the war took the first victim among the Lottas in our sector. The catering Lotta for an air surveillance post subjected to an Air Force Squadron was killed during an attack by an enemy patrol. I have received the following official communique:
" For the information of the recipients it is hereby stated that Lotta Sirkka Korhonen, born 23.June 1919 in Paltamo was killed in action at Muujärvi on 8. Julu 1942. Lotta Korhonen was on her way to a 12 day furlough in Jyväskylä and Mieslahti. The furlough transport was attacked by an enemy patrol and Lotta Korhonen was killed by them."
A soldier who survived in the lorry by feigning dead has told:
"The first lorry of the column, where Lotta Korhonen was riding, hit a mine and she was wounded but likely not very severely as she was able to speak. An enemy dressed in Finnish uniform had pulled her out of the lorry cabin and bayoneted to death."
I had met Lotta Korhonen just a couple of times so I did not know her very well.
-She had reported as her next of kin her sister. Lotta Korhonen had been an adoptive child in Paltamo, and her adoptive family sister, also a Lotta in this sector, was also in the same column, also on furlough."

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Re: Losses of Lotta Svärd in Winter War & Continuation War

Postby Lotvonen » 08 Mar 2017 06:40

Found by chance here is a description of the partisan attack mentioned above.

Hemmi Alasaukko-oja
Partisan attack at a road
Journal “Kansa Taisteli” vol. 6/7, 1959

Our front sector at Rukajärvi, the Ontajoki river line was a typical wilderness front. The road used tor the transports of 14.D. Passed through a wide area of forest and swamp. This wide wilderness area was impossible to secure with the troops available. So even strong enemy patrols were able to move almost like “at home” deep behind the fornt line and make nasty surprises for the road users.

It was July 7 (1942) as I received my furlough certificate at the HQ of I/JR10 and headed for the small town of Rukajärvi to head for Lieksa on a lorry the next night. The Lotta canteens of the town were teeming with lads of other outfits to join the same trip that everyone had been eagerly expecting. Nobody had even an idea that their journey was to be interrupted by a treacherous enemy attack, a journey that a front line man considered quite safe.

The furlough transport set out at 24.00hrs and it was a beautiful summer night. The distance to the rail head at Lieksa was about 240km. The train to North was to leave at 06.00hrs and we wanted to be there in time.

There were three vehicles for the happy furloughers. One bus and two lorries. I boarded the first lorry and the other vehicles followed us at a short distance. We kept going at a fair rate for about 10km until we arrived at the small village of Muujärvi. Here our lorry stopped because a Lotta, (Sirkka Korhonen, tr.rem.) also on furlough, wanted a ride. She was given a seat in the cab. As it had started drizzling us on the lorry bed suggested that the tarp should be spread over us because it would be easy to string on. (This later turned out to be a fateful thing to do.)

We set out again and told the driver to “step on it” so that we should make it for the morning train from Lieksa. Our next stop was to be Repola where our documents were to be verified.

Our driver paid heed to our wishes and the distance to the vehicles behind us increased. We went on for another 20 to 30 km as there was a sudden explosion and auto weapons fire was opened at our lorry from ahead and from the right.

The explosive planted in the road had broken the right front wheel and the lorry, due to the speed, kept sliding another 30 to 40 m at a slight descent of the road until it hit the shallow ditch on the right side, and the engine stopped.

I was sitting on the lorry bed leaning against the cab. There were five of us sitting abreast and I was sitting on the side. Taking a look at the pal on my right I saw that he had a large hole in his forehead, so he was dead. Our lorry was being fired at very intensely and it was not possible to get off because the tarp was covering us and hampering our movements.

As our lorry had stopped the enemy shifted their LMG at the bank of the ditch where our lorry was and fired at the lorry bed that was well exposed on the slight downhill. I threw myself down on the lorry bed with the rest of us believing my last moments were at hand. The noise on the lorry bed was undescribable. Wounded men moaned until new bursts finished each one's suffering in turn. I felt how my tunic was vibrating as the jets of bullets passed me at a short distance. Yet I was aware I had not been hit seriously.

This went on for a few minutes, then the shooting ended. Tensely I was waiting what would happen next. Most of all I feared that the enemy would round off their act of destruction by throwing a hand grenade among us, but fortunately for me they did not.

I heard people approaching the lorry, and the first words that I heard were Finnish. There was the weak hope that they would be our men, from the lorries following us. Alas, my hopes were quashed because soon I detected Russian gibberish among the banter. The language they used made me think that they were a brutal gang, because they called us (Finns) by many kinds of contemptuous names and used a lot of crude swear words.

I was able to deduce that there will be no quarter for us survivours. I heard how their leader egged on his men to open the knots of the tarp ropes :
-We are in a hurry now! We are not going to set up camp here!
The tarp was pulled off and a man got on the lorry bed and started pushing down the dead men. Soon it was my turn. The enemy soldier grabbed the strap of my map case and said at once:
-Here is one bastared alive still!
He made an earnest effort to throw me down from the lorry, but I did not let him do it. I got up and got carefully off the lorry . My uniform was red all over with drenched blood, from top to toe, and I think they believed I was at least a little wounded .

The aforementioned enemy soldier took my map case at once. Although it contained my private belongings, cigarettes etc., I could not even think of resisting but handed everything over voluntarily, although it was a bitter thing to do. So I had “landed” sucessfully and had an opportunity to glance around a little. The enemy patrol, many of which were wearing Finnish summer tunics, were busy looting our dead. I, too, had my pockets turned and I lost my mirror, my comb, a box of matches and my wallet containing 1000FIM. Finally they took my belt with the obligatory Finnish tool, a sheath knife hanging on it. Now they seemed to consider me quite harmless.

At this stage I started watching out for a chance to escape. I was aware that it was my only chance of surviving. I saw their CO, a tall, raw-looking bearded man with a Finnish Captain's rosettes on the lapels of his summer tunic. This drama was going on like a film in front of my eyes, the enemies were still busy robbing our dead, the ones showing any signs of life were mercilessly killed. The dead men were being stripped of clothing and the enemies swapped their wadded jackets for summer tunics. The Lotta who had been in the cabin was dragged in the forest. There were about one platoon of enemies and they were heavily armed with auto weapons and autoloading rifles

This activity had been going on for a while until the patrol leader uttered a few words in Russian and then to a very bearded tall man in Finnish while pointing at me:
-Aleksejeff, guard that man!
The said Aleksejeff started pushing me at my neck, demanding me to proceed to the forest ahead of him. I may have been too slow as he had to push me in the back several times as I sat down at a pine about a dozen meters from the road and said:
-This may be far enough .
Aleksejeff, set as my guard, was standing a few meters from me. I saw he was armed with a Finnish SMG . I was looking at him with one eye and with the other one I tried to get an idea of the surrounding forest.

The enemy weapon was cocked and the gunner's finger was on the trigger, so it was hopeless to try to escape. Also I could see that my guard was not pleased with his task as he kept glancing at his comrades who were collecting loot and he was missing the chance.

A brief pull of the trigger and I would not be here writing this. I resolved to keep my mind clear and decided that soon I had to act, quickly but not foolhardily.

I was aware that I was running out of time, the first opportunity had to be used. It did not make sense to resist, escaping was the only means out.

Finally I noticed that my guard used his left hand to pull out a bag of tobacco from his pocket while keeping his right hand on the weapon. The strap was over his neck and the weapon hanging over his chest for quick use. I observed how he tried to fill the bowl of his pipe with one hand but as it did not succeed he had to take his right hand off the weapon to fill his pipe. His finger was away from the trigger, the gun muzzle pointing at the ground - I spotted my chance.

Like a tiger I jumped up and started running for the forest. The first 50m were open ground, just some trees pushed over by wind, providing no cover. I was bouncing over the fallen trees running as fast as only a man whose life depends on it is able to. Ducking was not an option, I just had to reach the cover of the forest provided by the dense firs ahead of me. My guard was not tarrying. Of course he saw what I was doing and started firing at me. However, he had not been prepared and his shooting was aimless and hurried. He spent the entire magazine.

The other enemies joined the shooting which was in fact mindless. By then I was already near the dense trees and a little later I found myself in good cover. I ducked and the wild shooting went on. As it decreased I moved on deeper in the forest. Again tremendous firing started accompanied by wild screaming. By now I felt safe. I proceeded some distance toward Repola and approached the road. I had no idea about the hour except it was past midnight. I sought a dense fir tree and got under its branches to get in cover from the rain.

I stayed there because I knew that at some time next morning a column will be coming from Repola, and I had to stop them. I have no idea how long I stayed there. As my tension was relieved I found myself totally worn out and in a state of shock, I cannot tell if I slept or not. I was totally wet and my teeth were chattering. I had to get up and get warm by moving.

Finally I heard a sound of automobile engine and got ready to stop it. As I saw the first lorry I stepped in the middle of the road in order not to give rise to suspicion. The lorry stopped near me, and the others after it, and it was a column made up of several dozens of lorries. They had been aware of some misfortune having taken place as the furlough transport never arrived at Repola, although they should have arrived before the column to Rukajärvi started.

The column was prepared for the worst. The first lorry was armed with auto weapons and the entire column was fit for fighting if necessary.
-As far as I remember the column CO was a Lieutenant and I had a talk with him about the incident.

However, soon men came from vehicles farther down the column. They were wearing buttoned up raincoats and I could not see their insignias. I recognised the first one: our Divisional CO Gen. Maj. E. Raappana. He was accompanied by men who could have been colonels or majors judging by their apparent advanced age.

Gen. Raappana honoured me by asking what kind of a man I was, where was my belt? I answered him that I have lost much more than a belt, and I was not able to pine for it. I said I, too, was a Finnish soldier. I described him what had happened and also mentioned that I had been on my way to furlough but apparently it was ended here as I did not have any certificate.

The General enquired if my furlough was an urgent one, he said he could help me so that I would not have to get back to my outfit to get the documents. As I told him it was the ordinary 14 day furlough, he told me to join the column and get back to my outfit. Finally he remarked:
A bloodied fellow like that cannot be let to go home, you would scare people.
Do you know how to use a SMG ? He asked.

I thought his question was rather offending, not only to me but my outfit that had carried out several missions which should have removed all doubts as to ability to use weapons.
I answered somewhat accordingly.

I was told to get a SMG from the first lorry and climb on a load of hay while the column would head for the location of attack. I would have preferred to go on foot but it was an order.

Soon enough we found ourselves on the location, sappers from Muujärvi were already there, removing the mines the enemies had planted in the road. It was not a delightful sight we saw. The enemies had done a thorough job. There were as far as I remember eleven half undressed dead men and one Lotta lying on the ground; their furlough had ended there.

There was a lot of activity there with several kinds of “experts” and “advisers” who I ignored. But I do remember the Division CO who started talking with his staff officers having watched the scene for a while. I heard him say that something must be done to prevent this kind of incidents.

The road was soon demined and I could continue my journey back to my outfit. I had to walk the final leg of the journey as lorries were not allowed so close to the front line. Arriving at the Battalion HQ I spotted to my joy my Company CO, capt. G.R.Renvall. Immediately he enquired about the incident which I described him. With his favourable assistance new furlough documents were drawn up and I was ready to leave again.

I could see that the words of our General had had results. The column was supported by armoured cars, one leading and two more among the column. Also some lorries had been reinforced by sandbags on the sides of the bed and men with auto weapons were riding on them. I was sure a small enemy patrol would not have nerve to engage such a column and if they tried they would not get away with it without casualties.

The transports were fairly left alone by the enemy patrol attacks since.

One amusing fact that I found out as I I was in Lieksa on my way from my furlough. There I met friends who had read in enemy leaflets that I had been taken prisoner and I should have told every Finnish soldier to surrender. Well, that was another piece of war propaganda, familiar to every veteran.
Also I learned that the lorry driver had survived the attack, but how he made it I do not know.

(snip)

(2564 words)


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