Stalag VIII B

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Stalag VIII B

Post by kindzjal » 27 Dec 2007 22:56


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Post by kindzjal » 27 Dec 2007 23:00

I have forgotten about this picture:
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Post by kindzjal » 29 Dec 2007 11:37

Many of the men held in Stalag VIIIB were not in the main camp but in smaller work camps known as arbeits kommandos. The "E" prefix stands for English, but POW's from many Commonwealth countries worked in these camps.
Arbeits kommandos:

Schalkendorf in the Kreis (Area of) Opole.
Stauverder
E1 Laband
E3 Blechammer
E8 Krappitz. paper mill
E17 Opole. cement factory
E22 Gleiwitz-Ohringen (now Gliwice Sosnica)
E25 Rauschwalde, Kreis Falkenberg
E27 coal mine
E51 Klausberg
E62 Gleiwitz-Steigern
E72 Beuthen
E75 Knurow
E88 Hohrnlohehutte
E93 Sakrau limestone quarry
E94 Emilienhoff limestone quarry
E110 Stauwerder
E114 Gross Kunzendorf stone quarry and factory
E119 Mankendorf Saw Mill
E138 Ratibor Steel works
E131 Tiefbau Pollok. stone quarry
E149 Buchenlust forestry work
E162 Oderthal
E196 Opoleonoora cement factory
E203 Opole cement works
E209 Bobrek. coal mine
E211 Treibiz. railway
E218 Flossingen
E234 Tonhain.
E243 Breslau (gasworks)
E256 Zuckmantel,
E276 Ottmachau. sugar beet factory.
E283 Ratibor (sugar mill)
E324 Gross Dubrnsko
E332 Rudgershagen
E365 Gross Strelitz lime quarry
E373 Blaschke, Czechoslovakia, sawmill
E389 Rudgershagen
E393 Mittel-Lazisk
E399 Sudetenland Cardboard Factory
E411 Hohenzollerngrube Beuthen coal mine
E419 Opole
E446 Zuckmantel,
E456 Kalkau
E460 building railway bridge
E479 Tarnowitz
E484 Neisse. labouring
E486 Neisse labouring
E490 Beuthen railway building
E494 Gleiwitz Ost
E51 coal mine
E535 Sosnowitz West coal mine
E538 Sosnowice mine
E542 Fohrengrund ub Gleiwtz
E543 Drmbrowa
E552 Hindenberg Philipstr
E561 Tarnowtitz. railway depot loading and unloading trains
E562 Coal mine "Janina", near Libiaz
E563 Bory Jelen Jaworzno
E565 Sierza Wodna coal mine
E571 Gruden forestry department
E578 Peiskretscham, Kreis Gleiwitz
E579 Niwka
E580 Czelads
E586 Kazimierz
E587 Czelads Piarski
E593 Beuthen Schonberg
E594 Konigshutte Ost
E596 Jaworzno
E603 Hindenburg
E701 Tichau Czulow (paper factory)
E702 Klimontow coal mine [see http://www.infomag.com.pl/~klimontow/english.htm]
E706 Coal mine near Jaworzno, mostly Australians and New Zealanders
E707 Sosnowitz
E708 Laband
E711A Heydebreck
E714 Blechhammer, Upper Silesia
E715 IG Farben chemical factory in Monowice. Set up in September 1943, it housed about 1200 prisoners, mostly British
E719 Steigern
E724 Schwientochlowitz
E725 Konigshutte Bismark
E727 Mechtal Beuthen. power station
E728 Neu Oderberg
E732 Czciakowa
E734 Schoppintiz
E739 Dombrowa Grunkolonie
E740 Kobier
E742 Ober Lazisk
E744 Kazimierz
E746 Konigshutte
E748 Brorek
E749 Peiskretscham
E750 Kattowitz
E753 Graumanndorf
E754 Czelads
E755 Wojkowitz Komorne
E756 Radzionkau
E757 Morenrot
E758 Knurow
E759 Glewitz
E760 Bobrek
E761 Bobrek
E762 Bobrek
E794 Heydebreck
E902 coal mine
E902 Delbruckschachte-Hindenburg coal mine
E22050 gas works

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Post by kindzjal » 29 Dec 2007 11:56

The Trial of German Major War Criminals
Sitting at Nuremberg, Germany
14th February to 26th February, 1946
Sixty-Eighth Day: Tuesday, 26th February, 1946
(Part 2 of 7)

COLONEL SMIRNOV: Mr. President, I pass on to the next count of my statement, the "Discrimination against the Soviet people".

Discrimination against the Soviet population was the usual method of the Hitlerite criminals. It was carried out by the criminals continuously and everywhere.

In this part of my statement I shall refer to the documents of the German

[Page 312]

criminals themselves, which have only now been obtained and placed at the disposal of the Soviet prosecution. They were seized by the Extraordinary State Commission in the Prisoner- of-War Camp at Lamsdorf.
I submit to the Tribunal as Exhibit USSR 415 a communication of the Extraordinary State Commission on "The Crimes committed by the German Government and the German High Command against Soviet Prisoners of War in the Camp of Lamsdorf". A number of original documents of the German fascist criminals, discovered in the camp archives, are attached to the report.

I shall be able to submit some of these reports to your Honours. Their value consists in the fact that they prove that even under the murderous regime established in one of the largest and most cruel of the German concentration camps, the criminals, true to the cannibalistic principles of their "theories," shamelessly discriminated against the Soviet nationals. I shall quote a few brief excerpts from the report in question of the Extraordinary State Commission. The passage, your Honours, to which I refer, you will find on Page 123 of the document book, paragraph 4. It sets forth the general characteristics of the camp:-

"As a result of investigations made, the Extraordinary State Commission found that in Lamsdorf, in the district of the town of Oppeln, there existed, from 1941 to May, 1945, a German stationary camp, No. 344.
In 1940-1941 this camp contained Polish prisoners of war; from the end of 1941 Soviet, English and French prisoners of war began to come in."

I omit the next two sentences and continue the quotation:-
"The prisoners of war were deprived of their outer clothing and boots. Even in winter they had to go barefoot. No fewer than 300,000 prisoners of war passed through the camp during the years of its existence, including 200,000 Soviet and 100,000 Polish, English, French, Belgian and Greek prisoners.
The usual method for the extermination of Soviet prisoners in Lamsdorf camp was the sale of the captives to German undertakings for work in the various German firms where they were mercilessly exploited until, their strength completely lost, they died of exhaustion.

In contrast to the numerous German labour exchanges, where Sauckel's representatives sold enslaved Soviet citizens singly to German housewives, a wholesale business in internees was organised in Lamsdorf camp where the captives were formed into working gangs. There were 1,011 such working gangs in the camp."

When presenting the subsequent documents, I should like to ask the Tribunal to understand correctly the statements in corroboration of which I am submitting evidence.
I do not in the least wish to say that the regime established by the Germans for British, French or other prisoners of war was at all distinguished for humanity or kindness and that it was only the Soviet prisoners of war who were exterminated by the camp administration by various criminal methods.

Not at all. Lamsdorf Camp definitely pursued its object, which was the extermination of prisoners of war, regardless of their nationality or citizenship. Nevertheless, even in this "Death Camp", where the conditions of prisoners of war of all nationalities were most terrible, the German fascists, committing Crimes Against Humanity and faithful to the principles of their theories, created particularly appalling conditions for the people of the Soviet.

I shall submit to the Tribunal, in a few brief excerpts, a series of documents taken from the archives of this camp and presented to the Tribunal in the original version. All these documents point to the manifest discrimination against Soviet

[Page 313]

prisoners of war carried out by the camp administration, pursuant to orders of the Reich Government and of the High Command.
I submit to the Tribunal as Exhibit USSR 421 a memoranda on the "Utilisation of the Labour of Soviet Prisoners of War", addressed by the Chief of the Prisoner of War Department for the 8th Military District to the Administration of Industrial Concerns to which the prisoners of war were sent. I request the Tribunal to accept this document as evidence. It is submitted in the original. I quote point 10 of this memoranda, and your Honours will find the passage quoted in the last paragraph of Page 150 of the document book:-

"The following directives have been issued for the treatment of Russian prisoners of war.
The Russian prisoners of war have passed through the school of Bolshevism, they must be looked upon as Bolsheviks and treated as Bolsheviks. According to Soviet instructions they must, even in captivity, resist actively the State which has captured them. Therefore, we must from the very beginning treat all Russian prisoners of war with merciless severity, if they give us the slightest pretext for so doing.

Civilians attempting, by any means, to approach the Russian prisoners of war, to exchange ideas with them, to hand them money, food, etc., will be arrested, questioned, and handed over to the Police."

In addition, I quote the introduction to this memoranda. Your Honours will find it on Page 149 of the document book, paragraph 2.
"The General Staff of the Armed Forces has issued an order regulating the utilisation of Soviet prisoner-of- war labour. According to this order the utilisation of Russian prisoners of war could be tolerated only if carried out under far harsher conditions than those applied to prisoners of war of other nationalities."
Thus the instructions for a specially cruel regime, to be applied to Soviet prisoners of war merely because they were Soviet prisoners, were not the result of any arbitrary action on the part of the Lamsdorf Camp Administration. They were dictated by the General Staff of the Armed Forces. In drafting this memorandum, the Lamsdorf Camp Administration was only carrying out direct orders from the Supreme Command.
I quote two more rather characteristic points from the memorandum. First, sub-paragraph 4, which your Honours will find on Page 149 of the document book, last paragraph. It is very brief:-

"Requirements for the Russian billets - from the viewpoint of comfort - must be reduced to the lowest possible level."
I shall attempt to explain later on what this means.
The second characteristic point is found in sub-paragraph 7, which your Honours will find on Page 170 of the document book, paragraph 3. I quote as follows:-

"The food rations for Russian prisoners of war at work will differ from the rations allocated to prisoners of other nationalities. More detailed information on this subject will be given later."
Such was the memorandum addressed to the industrialists to whose concern the Russian prisoners of war were sent to work as slaves.
I submit to the Tribunal Exhibit USSR 431, which is another memorandum, addressed this time to the soldiers guarding the Soviet prisoners of war. The document is submitted in the original and I request the Tribunal to accept it as evidence into the records. I ask the permission of the Tribunal to quote a few brief excerpts from this document. The first page of the text states that it is

[Page 314]

an appendix to a "Directive from the General Staff of the Wehrmacht". Next follow number and document, which are not so important.
I now read the introduction to this memorandum, which is on Page 152 of the document book:-

"For the first time in this war the German soldier is faced with an adversary who is educated both in a military and in a political sense, whose ideal is Communism and who sees in National Socialism his very worst enemy.
" I omit the next paragraph and continue:-
"Even in captivity, the Soviet soldier - however harmless he may appear outwardly - will seize every opportunity to show his hatred for all that is German. We must reckon with the fact that the prisoners will have received special instructions on their behaviour if captured and interned."
My colleague, Colonel Pokrovsky, has already denounced the absurdity of these so-called "special instructions" and I therefore do not consider it necessary to dwell on this passage. I continue:-
"It is therefore absolutely essential, when dealing with them, to exercise the greatest caution and prudence, and to nourish the deepest suspicions."
The following directives were issued to the guard over the Soviet prisoners :-
Firstly, ruthless action at the slightest sign of resistance or disobedience. Merciless use of firearms to break any resistance. Escaping soldiers to be shot immediately, without challenge, with firm intent to hit. "Without challenge", is characteristic.

I omit the two following paragraphs and quote the second part, sub-paragraph 3 of the memorandum, which your Honours will find on Page 153, paragraph 2 of the document book. From this sub-paragraph I quote 3 lines:-

"Kindness is out of place, even when dealing with assiduous and obedient prisoners of war. They will ascribe it to weakness and draw their own conclusions."
I omit sub-paragraph 4 and end my quotation from this document on sub-paragraph 5 of the memorandum. Your Honours will find this passage on Page 153, last paragraph of the document book.
"5. Never must the apparent inoffensiveness of the Bolshevik prisoner of war tempt you to deviate from the above-mentioned instructions."
A very short time ago, I quoted sub-paragraph 4 of the memorandum, regarding the utilisation of the labour of Soviet prisoners allotted to the industries. It stated that the requirements respecting billets for the Soviet prisoners should, from the viewpoint of comfort, be of "the lowest possible level". The meaning of this will be clear to your Honours from a report of the Chief of Supplies and Equipment of the Army, dated 17th October, 1941, addressed to the Acting Corps Commanders and to the Administrative Authorities of Military Districts.
I submit this document as Exhibit USSR 422. This, too, is presented in the original and I beg that it be entered as documentary evidence into the records. It was issued in Berlin and dated as far back as 17th October, 1941. I quote one paragraph of the text. Your Honours will find this paragraph on Page 154 of the document book. I quote:-

"Subject: Quarters for Soviet Prisoners of War.
At a conference held on 19 September, 1941, at the office of the Chief of Supplies and Equipment of the Army, it was decided that by the construction of several tiers of wooden bunks, in lieu of bedsteads, an R.A.D. (Reich Labour Service) barracks for 150 prisoners, could be converted according to specifications for Soviet Prisoners' mass-barracks, to hold 840 prisoners."

[Page 315]

I shall not quote the remainder of this document, since I consider this paragraph sufficiently clear in itself.
I request the Tribunal to accept in evidence two documents which are also presented in the original. They testify to the fact that the extermination, in the camp, of Soviet prisoners of war was practised for political reasons.

I shall first submit, as Exhibit USSR 462, an order addressed to Camp No. 60. The document is in the original and I request that it be added to the records as evidence. Your Honours will find the paragraph which I wish to quote on Page 155 of the document book.

THE PRESIDENT: The Tribunal will adjourn now.

(A recess was taken.)

COLONEL SMIRNOV: I shall quote one passage only of the document already submitted. The passage which I ask the permission of the Tribunal to read is on Page 155, sub- paragraph 4 of the order:-

"Routine Procedure at the Shooting or Serious Wounding of a Prisoner of War.
Every case of shooting or serious wounding of a prisoner of war should be reported as a special casualty. If you are dealing with English, French, Belgian or American prisoners of war you should also act in accordance with instructions of the Supreme Command, Code No. " f "-24."

This order was dated 2nd August, 1943.
On 5 November, 1943, however, another order followed which changed even this procedure where the Soviet prisoners of war were concerned. I request the Tribunal to accept in evidence the document which I am submitting as No. 433, pertaining to Camp No. 86. From this document I quote one paragraph only, i.e., paragraph 12:-

"The Shooting of Soviet Prisoners of War (Judicial Investigator.)
The shooting of Soviet prisoners of war and other fatal accidents need no longer be reported to Prisoner of War Commander as an 'Unusual Casualty'."

In certain cases, the High Command of the German Armed Forces agreed to the payment of a miserably small sum for the work done by the prisoners of war, but here, too, the Soviet prisoners of war were treated twice as badly as the prisoners of other nationalities. To confirm this, I request the Tribunal to accept in evidence the directive of the High Command of the German Armed Forces dated 1 March, 1944. The document will be submitted as Exhibit USSR 4271 request that the Tribunal attach it to the documentation of the case as evidence. From this document I shall quote two sentences only. These sentences, your Honours will find on Page 274 of the document book:-
"Prisoners of war, working all day, will receive for one full working day the following basic pay:-
Non-Soviet Prisoners of War - RM 0,70.

Soviet Prisoners of War - RM 0,35."

(The second sentence is at the end of the document, on Page 275 of the document book, last paragraph):-
"The minimum daily pay, for non-Soviet prisoners, will be RM 0,20, and for Soviet prisoners of war RM 0,10."
Here I end my quotation from this document.
If other prisoners received from the German fascist murderers the right to a few breaths of fresh air per day, the Soviet people were deprived of even this privilege.

[Page 316]

I request the Tribunal to accept in evidence an original order, Exhibit USSR 424, referring to Camp No. 44. 1 request the permission of the Tribunal to quote one sentence from paragraph 7, entitled "Walks for Prisoners of War".
"In special cases, when prisoners of war, engaged on work, have their living quarters at the same place where they work and therefore have no access to the open air, they should be allowed out into the fresh air in order to maintain their working strength."
I further request the Tribunal to accept as evidence the original order addressed to Camp No. 46. This document is submitted as Exhibit USSR 425. I would remind the Tribunal that the preceding order "Walks for Prisoners of War" was listed under sub-paragraph 7. I cite one sentence from sub- paragraph 10 of Order No. 46. This sub-paragraph 10 is also entitled "Walks for Prisoners of War" and the basis for this sub-paragraph is order No. 1259, Part 5 of the Chief of the Section for Prisoner of War Affairs, dated 2 June, 1943. I quote one sentence:-
"Supplementary to sub-paragraph 7 of the order addressed to Camp No. 44, dated 8 June, 1943, it is pointed out that the order does not apply to Soviet Prisoners of War."
I further request the Tribunal to accept in evidence the original announcement of the Labour Administrator Marisch Schonberg. This announcement concerns prisoners of war in regard to their employment on agricultural work. I quote two sentences from this document. The passage which I have asked permission to quote is on Page 160 of the document book. I begin the quotation:-
"The replacement of 104 English prisoners of war from Labour Brigade for Prisoners of War E 351, currently employed in the Heinrichsthal Paper Mills, by 160 Soviet prisoners of war, has been rendered necessary by the recently arisen labour shortage. An additional allocation of English prisoners, to raise the number to the required figure of 160, is impossible, since after the last check- up on camp conditions, undertaken a few months ago by competent Wehrmacht authorities, it was decided that billets in the camp were only sufficient for 104 English prisoners of war, whereas the same space would accommodate 160 Russian prisoners of war without any difficulties whatsoever."
I request your Honour's permission to quote one more document, namely: "Directive No. 8 regarding this camp", dated 7 May, 1942. It is entitled "The Utilisation of Soviet Prisoners of War for Work".
I submit this document in the original as Exhibit USSR 126, and I request that it be added as evidence to the records of the Tribunal.

I quote the section entitled "Measures for the restoration of full working capacity:-

"The Soviet prisoners of war are, almost without exception, in a state of acute malnutrition, which currently renders them unfit for a normal output of work."
The General Staff of the German Armed Forces was particularly concerned with two questions: (1) blankets for Soviet prisoners of war and (2) in what form should the mercilessly murdered Soviet victims of the concentration camps be buried. Both questions found their solution in one document. I submit it to the Tribunal as Exhibit USSR 429 and request that it be added as evidence to the
[Page 317]

records. Your Honours will find it on Page 162 of the document book. This is a directive of the 8th Military District, dated 28 October, 1941. I begin the quotation:-
"Re: Soviet-Russian Prisoners of War. The following arrangements were decided on during a conference of the O.K.W.:-
First - Blankets. The Soviet-Russians will receive paper blankets, which they will have to manufacture themselves, in the form of quilts, from paper tissue, fitted with light-weight paper and similar material. The material will be placed at the disposal of the O.K.W."

The second part, as your Honours already know, is as follows:-
The heading reads: "Burial of Soviet-Russians.
Soviet prisoners of war are to be buried naked, without a coffin, wrapped in packing paper. Coffins will only be used for transports. In the working gangs the burial will be attended to by the competent authorities. Burial expenses will be met by the competent Stalag for prisoners of war. The stripping of the bodies will be done by the camp guards. Signed by order of Grossekettler."

It was not only the administration of the military district that was concerned with the methods for burying Soviet prisoners of war; the Ministry of the Interior was also concerned with this question, and an urgent letter was addressed to the camp specially marked "Not for publication in the Press even in excerpts". I request the Tribunal to accept this document in evidence as Exhibit USSR 430. The members of the Tribunal can find this passage on Page 276 of the document book. I quote five sentences from this fairly voluminous document:-
"As regards the transport of the bodies and the provision of vehicles, the Wehrmacht should be contacted. For transport and burial a coffin is not necessary. The bodies should be completely wrapped up in paper, preferably in oiled paper, tarpaulin, corrugated paper or some other suitable material. Both transportation and burial should be done unostentatiously. When many corpses come in at the same time, burial should take place in a common grave. The corpses should be laid at the usual depth, side by side, not overlaying each other. As a site for the burial, a remote part of the cemetery should be chosen. Any burial service and any decoration of the graves should be disallowed."
Omitting the next sentence:-
"It is necessary to keep expenses as low as possible."
But even in the special organisations of German fascism, specially created for the extermination of human life, the criminals still continued in their policy of racial and political discrimination. Actually, this discrimination could mean one thing only, namely, that one part of the camp prisoners came to their inevitable end - death - more rapidly than the other part. The criminals even tried to make the inevitable end more terrible for those of their victims whom they - following the Nazi man-hating "theories" - called "sub-humans", or whom they considered to be capable of active resistance.
I request the permission of the Tribunal to read into the record one paragraph from a document already submitted as Exhibit USSR 415. This is a report of the Extraordinary State Commission on the "Crimes at Lamsdorf Camp" and the quotation will testify to the extent of the criminal Hitlerite activities. It concludes the presentation of evidence regarding this camp. Your Honours will find the passage in question on Page 146 of the document book, paragraph 5.

"According to the findings of the Special Commission, during the existence of the Lamsdorf camp the Germans tortured to death more than 100,000 Soviet prisoners of war. Most of these died in the mines, in the various,
industrial enterprises, or during transportation back to the camp. Some were crushed to death in the dugouts, many were killed en route during the evacuation of the camp. Forty thousand prisoners of war died in the Lamsdorf Camp proper."
Last edited by kindzjal on 30 Dec 2007 20:34, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by kindzjal » 29 Dec 2007 12:03

Some pictures made during the reburial of the thousends of the prissoners, after the war :
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Post by kindzjal » 29 Dec 2007 13:51

Some pictures from the Stalag VIIIB :
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Post by kindzjal » 29 Dec 2007 17:56

Just found this :
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Post by kindzjal » 30 Dec 2007 16:11

Some new pictures:
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Post by kindzjal » 30 Dec 2007 16:14

The main gate :
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Post by kindzjal » 30 Dec 2007 17:01

Just found an very interesting article in ukrainian :

http://news2000.org.ua/print?a=%2Fpaper%2F12182

It says that the father of the president Yuschenko (Ukraine) was a POW in this Stalag. In february 1944 he has been arrested by the Gestapo (Oppeln) and taken away from Lamsdorf. After his arrest he has been sent to Auschwitz....

The picture below shows us the treatment of Soviet POW's by the Germans:
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Post by kindzjal » 30 Dec 2007 20:50

The Soviet POW's weren't put in barrac's, like the other allied prisoners.
They were left in the open air and tried to dug holes in the ground, etc.
Please watch the photo's, just one word I can say : terrible !
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Post by kindzjal » 30 Dec 2007 20:53

Some more :
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Stalag VIIB Lamsdorf

Post by Philip Baker » 03 Jan 2008 12:25

Have you seen my website http://www.freewebs.com/lamsdorf ?

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Post by kindzjal » 03 Jan 2008 19:16

Yes thank You a very nice and interrestig site.

Here w have a few photos showing how the stalag looks now :
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Post by kindzjal » 07 Jan 2008 21:27

We also might not forget about the first POWs in the Lamsdorf Stalags : the Poles. The first group of Polish prisoners were brought in on the 5th of september 1939. It were 18 officers, 940 soldiers and 7 civilians.
Here we have a picture of a few of those men:
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