Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Discussions on the Holocaust and 20th Century War Crimes. Note that Holocaust denial is not allowed. Hosted by David Thompson.
allspray01
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: 20 Oct 2009 18:57

Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by allspray01 » 03 Nov 2009 20:00

because the gaurds had to kill so many and some didnt like what they did, were they ever threatened to do what they had to??

mycroftson
Member
Posts: 5
Joined: 13 Jan 2007 04:38
Location: Blighty

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by mycroftson » 02 Mar 2010 02:05

the guards didn't do the killing, but aside from that those fit enough for the front line had the choice to ask for a transfer to the front which some took. This of course worked out worse for the prisoners.

albert88
Member
Posts: 5
Joined: 28 Feb 2010 15:44

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by albert88 » 02 Mar 2010 02:55

Why were 17 guards executed for violence brought on the prison population?

David Thompson
Forum Staff
Posts: 23283
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by David Thompson » 02 Mar 2010 04:37

albert88 -- You asked:
Why were 17 guards executed for violence brought on the prison population?
When asking a question, please give enough background information for it to be answered, starting with who, what, where and when. That way, readers and posters will know what you're talking about. It also helps if you tell the readers and posters what you've already done to find an answer to your question. That way, no one wastes any time duplicating what you've already done.

Rob - wssob2
Member
Posts: 2387
Joined: 15 Apr 2002 20:29
Location: MA, USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by Rob - wssob2 » 02 Mar 2010 05:21

Allspray01, you wrote:
Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to...
In software development there is a term - GIGO - which stands for "garbage in, garbage out." If you want an informative answer, you need to ask an informed, articulate question. What guards? Where? When? To do what?
because the gaurds had to kill so many and some didnt like what they did,
Again - what guards? Killing who? Where? When? If you don't write what guards you're referring to, how can we possibly know what they felt?
were they ever threatened to do what they had to??
Threatened by who?

Here's an example of a better formulation of your question:

"When concentration camp inmates were forced marched through the rapidly-shrinking Reich during the spring of 1945, is there any evidence that SS senior commanders threatened guards with punishment if they showed leniency towards their prisoners?"

I hope that you will reformulate your question.

JamesL
Member
Posts: 1647
Joined: 28 Oct 2004 00:03
Location: NJ USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by JamesL » 03 Mar 2010 04:16

Here is an excerpt from a book which may provide a partial answer to the question "Were the guards ever threatened"....?

A young officer now in Munich received an order to shoot 350 civilians, allegedly partisans, among them women and children, who had been herded together into a big barn. He hesitated at first, but was then warned that the penalty for disobedience is death. He begged for ten minutes time to think it over, and finally carried out the order with machine-gun fire. He was so shaken by this episode that he was determined ... not to go back to the front.

Source: German Rule in Russia 1941-1945 by Alexander Dallin, London, 1957, page 79, as quoted from The Von Hassel Diaries, Stuttgart, 1947.

albert88
Member
Posts: 5
Joined: 28 Feb 2010 15:44

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by albert88 » 04 Mar 2010 16:14

I think before you start accusing others of crimes we have to look into our own "back yard" and examine some of our own sins. Google this site and see what an American soldier had to say about various abuses.

'Eisenhower's Death Camps': A U.S. Prison Guard Remembers

David Thompson
Forum Staff
Posts: 23283
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by David Thompson » 04 Mar 2010 16:20

albert88 -- Please stay on the thread topic we're discussing here, which is the possible coercion of German concentration camp guards to commit criminal acts. If you want to discuss allegations of US mistreatment of German POWs, we already have a number of open threads on that subject.
Although there are occasionally exceptions, the forum management tries to keep a thread on a single topic. This makes it easier for readers to follow, and for researchers to subsequently locate, the discussions. If a poster would like to see further discussion of off-topic matters, please raise the subject in a pre-existing thread on that topic or, if there are no pre-existing threads, on a separate thread.

Non-complying posts are subject to deletion after warning
.
H&WC section rules
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=53962

You also have some pending questions in this thread you haven't answered. See http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 4#p1437464

Jonathan Harrison
Member
Posts: 173
Joined: 24 Sep 2007 14:29
Location: USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by Jonathan Harrison » 04 Mar 2010 16:42

The Germans who served at Belzec, Treblinka and Sobibor had previously served in 'euthanasia' killing centres so it was already known that they would participate in extermination.

The Ukrainian guards were trained at Trawniki so any unwilling accomplice would have been weeded out there.

So the short answer is that the planning ensured that disobedience would not arise.

User avatar
Bernaschek
Member
Posts: 129
Joined: 16 Nov 2008 11:51
Location: New Delhi

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by Bernaschek » 04 Mar 2010 17:41

I remember a newspaper Interview with a Camp survivor, where he also stated, that (in a new camp, after some time): the guards where changed to Ukrainians, who would behave correctly and shoot only on orders.

not really on topic and no better reference unfortunately.

there where a lot of media discussions in connection with the "Wehrmachtsausstellung" some years ago, and the outcome was by and large that "normal" Wehrmacht personell mostly could get away with refusing to participate in crimes, though maybe not for example in carrying out a "standgericht" sentence.

A German Concentration Camp guard not wanting to risk to participate in cruelties would have to volunteer for the front and would maybe considered politically a bit unreliable.
"nuts"

Jonathan Harrison
Member
Posts: 173
Joined: 24 Sep 2007 14:29
Location: USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by Jonathan Harrison » 04 Mar 2010 18:01

The Treblinka 1965 trial judgment cites 13 cases where individuals did not obey criminal orders. Apologies for the length of the quote:
In der Hauptverhandlung sind ausserdem noch mehrere Fälle erörtert worden, in denen Vorgesetzte gegen SS-Männer unter anderem wegen Eigentumsdelikten und wegen Verstosses gegen die Geheimhaltungsvorschriften harte Bestrafungen ausgesprochen haben. Keiner der vernommenen Zeugen hat jedoch etwas darüber bekundet, dass in einem Vernichtungslager oder Konzentrationslager tätig gewesene SS-Männer deshalb Nachteile für Leib oder Leben erlitten, weil sie sich geweigert hatten, an der Massenvernichtung unschuldiger Menschen teilzunehmen. Auch der als Zeuge gehörte Staatssekretär a.D. Glo. hat hierzu nichts Bestimmtes sagen können. Er will lediglich gesprächsweise von Urlaubern in Berlin gehört haben, dass SS-Männer wegen ihrer Weigerung, Juden zu erschiessen, selbst getötet worden sein sollen. Einen auch nur annähernd konkreten Fall hat er aber nicht nennen können.

Viel zahlreicher sind dagegen die durch die Beweisaufnahme erwiesenen Fälle, bei denen Befehlsverweigerern gar nichts geschehen ist oder bei denen sie nur mit Degradierung beziehungsweise Pensionierung disziplinarisch gemassregelt worden sind. Es handelt sich unter anderem um folgende Fälle:

a. Fall Korsemann
Der Generalleutnant der Polizei und SS-Gruppenführer Korsemann weigerte sich 1942/1943, eine grössere Anzahl von Juden befehlsgemäss in das Vernichtungslager Maidanek bringen zu lassen. Er wurde dafür zum Oberstleutnant degradiert und in den Ruhestand versetzt.

b. Fall Jungklaus
Im Herbst 1944 liess der Generalleutnant der Polizei und SS-Gruppenführer Jungklaus bei der Räumung Brüssels belgische Widerstandskämpfer frei, anstatt sie nach einem Befehl Himmlers weiterhin in Gewahrsam zu halten. Er wurde zum Major degradiert.

c. Fall Zech
Im Jahre 1941 weigerte sich der damalige Polizeipräsident von Krakau, der SS-Gruppenführer Zech, jüdische Frauen und Kinder durch die ihm unterstellte Ordnungspolizei in ein Lager an der Lysa Gora bringen zu lassen. Er wurde abgelöst, nach Altenburg in Thüringen versetzt und fortan nur noch als Abwehrbeauftragter in einem Betrieb beschäftigt.

Die Feststellungen zu den Fällen a. bis c. beruhen auf der eidlichen Bekundung des kaufmännischen Angestellten und früheren SS-Obergruppenführers Ber.

d. Der Fall zweier Kriminalsekretäre
Im Winter 1941/42 hatten sich zwei aus Mitteldeutschland stammende Kriminalsekretäre, die zu dieser Zeit in Lettland Dienst taten, geweigert, jüdische Frauen und Kinder zu erschiessen. Der Befehlshaber der Sicherheitspolizei in Riga Dr. Stahlecker liess die beiden Kriminalbeamten in Haft nehmen. Nach einiger Zeit wurden sie von Riga nach Tilsit gebracht. Eine Anklage gegen sie wurde nicht erhoben. Dr. Stahlecker erklärte dem Zeugen Dr. Fi., der damals als SS-Untersuchungsführer die Ermittlungen gegen die zwei Kriminalbeamten führte, er solle noch einige Nachforschungen anstellen, damit die Sache im Sande verlaufen könne. Die Akten wurden deshalb an die Heimatdienststellen der beiden Beschuldigten nach Mitteldeutschland geschickt, gingen aber unterwegs durch Feindeinwirkung verloren. Gegen die beiden Inhaftierten wurde daraufhin nichts mehr unternommen. Wahrscheinlich wurden sie alsbald aus der Haft entlassen.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Bekundung des Rechtsanwalts und damaligen SS-Richters Dr. Fi.

e. Fall Rieger
Im Jahre 1941 weigerte sich der damalige Befehlshaber der Ordnungspolizei in Krakau, der General der Polizei Rieger, eine Kompanie seiner Polizei zur Erschiessung von Juden abzustellen. Sechs Wochen später wurde Rieger als Befehlshaber der Ordnungspolizei nach Prag versetzt. Kurze Zeit später wurde er ohne Angabe von Gründen pensioniert. Er erhielt seine vollen Pensionsbezüge.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Bekundung des Generalmajors der Ordnungspolizei a.D. Mü.

f. Fall En.
Im Herbst 1943 erteilte der SS- und Polizeiführer für Wolhynien/Podolien, der SS-Oberführer oder SS-Brigadeführer Günther, dem Zeugen En. den Befehl, etwa 400 bis 450 jüdische Arbeiter in Wladimir Wolynski zu liquidieren. En. lehnte das aus ethischen Gründen ab. Er erlitt hierdurch keine Nachteile.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Aussage des Polizeioberkommissars En.

g. Fall Hof.
Im Jahre 1941 befand sich der Zeuge Hof. als Polizist im Einsatz in Podolien. In Kamenez-Podolski gab der Kompaniechef bei einer Ansprache an seine Leute bekannt, dass die Kompanie in diesem Gebiet Juden zu erschiessen habe. Der Zeuge Hof. suchte kurz darauf seinen Hauptmann auf und erklärte ihm, er könne aus religiösen Gründen an dieser Erschiessungsaktion nicht teilnehmen. Der Hauptmann zeigte hierfür Verständnis und teilte Hof. einer Gruppe von 20 bis 30 Kameraden zu, die zurückbleiben konnten, während die übrigen etwa 100 bis 120 Mann zu Judenaktionen ausrücken mussten.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Bekundung des Metallarbeiters und ehemaligen Polizeioberwachtmeisters Hof., der betont hat, dass ihm nichts weiter geschehen sei, dass er aber in Zukunft bei Beförderungen hinter seinen Kameraden habe zurückstehen müssen.

h. Fall Herr.
Während des 2.Weltkrieges war der Zeuge Herr. als Angehöriger einer Polizeieinheit einmal in einem Ort bei Minsk stationiert. Sein Hauptmann teilte ihn zu einem aus 20 Mann bestehenden Exekutionskommando ein, das Juden zu liquidieren hatte. Herr. weigerte sich, an der Judenerschiessung teilzunehmen. Der Hauptmann beschimpfte ihn als "Memme und feigen Hund", nahm ihn jedoch aus dem Exekutionskommando heraus und teilte ihn einem anderen Kommando zu, ohne ihn zu bestrafen.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Aussage des Buchhalters Herr.

i. Fall Die.
Im Jahre 1942 sollte der Zeuge Die. als Angehöriger einer SS-Panzeraufklärungsabteilung, die damals im Raume Riga eingesetzt war, an einer Erschiessung von drei Juden mitwirken. Er wandte sich an seinen Bataillonskommandeur und bat darum, aus menschlichen Gründen von diesem Befehl entbunden zu werden. Diesem Wunsch entsprach der Kommandeur, ohne dass Die. irgendwelche Nachteile erlitt.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Aussage des Kellners Die.

j. Fall Will.
Im Jahre 1943 leitete der Zeuge Will., der damals aktiver Schutzpolizist war, einen in Nowogrudok stationierten Zug ukrainischer Schutzpolizei. Eines Tages verlangte sein Bataillonskommandeur die Gestellung eines Kommandos zur Erschiessung von Häftlingen. Der Zeuge lehnte das ab. Der Kommandeur gab sich damit zufrieden und liess das Exekutionskommando aus einem anderen Zug seiner Einheit zusammenstellen. Der Zeuge erlitt durch seine Weigerung keinerlei Nachteile.

Diese Feststellungen beruhen auf der eidlichen Aussage des Schreinermeisters Will.

k. Fall Dr. Ratzelsberger
Der aus Wien stammende Kriminalrat Dr. Ratzelsberger suchte während des 2.Weltkrieges den Chef der Einsatzgruppe C Dr. Max Thomas auf und erklärte ihm, er könne in dieser Einsatzgruppe nicht mehr mitmachen. Dr. Thomas hielt den "weichen" Dr. Ratzelsberger für den Einsatz im Osten nicht geeignet und schickte ihn nach Wien zurück.

l. Der Fall eines SS-Unterscharführers
Ausserdem sprach ein SS-Unterscharführer bei Dr. Thomas vor und erklärte ihm, er könne den harten Dienst bei der Einsatzgruppe nicht mehr mitmachen. Auch ihn schickte Dr. Thomas in die Heimat zurück.

m. Der Fall eines jungen SS-Obersturmführers
Schliesslich bat ein junger SS-Obersturmführer seinen Chef Dr. Thomas mit erregter Stimme um seine Ablösung, da er die Erschiessungsaktionen einfach nicht mehr mitmachen könne. Bei diesem Manne wurde Dr. Thomas zunächst sehr wütend und erwog, ihn vor das Kriegsgericht zu bringen. Dann überlegte er es sich anders und schickte den jungen SS-Offizier nach Berlin zurück. Die weitere Regelung der Angelegenheit oblag dem damaligen Personalchef im Reichssicherheitshauptamt SS-Brigadeführer Schu., der selbst mit Hilfe seines Freundes Str. gerade die Leitung eines Einsatzkommandos innerhalb der Einsatzgruppe C abgegeben hatte, weil er die schrecklichen Dinge im Osten nicht mehr mitmachen konnte. Der junge SS-Offizier wurde von Schu. wahrscheinlich anderweitig eingesetzt, ohne dass ihm besondere Nachteile erwuchsen. Die Feststellungen zu den Fällen k., 1. und m. beruhen auf der eidlichen Bekundung des Schriftstellers, ehemaligen katholischen Geistlichen und SS-Sturmbannführers Hart., zum Fall m. ausserdem noch auf der eidlichen Bekundung des Angestellten und früheren SS-Brigadeführers Schu. und auf der uneidlichen Aussage des Angestellten und ehemaligen SS-Gruppenführers Str.

Alle diese Feststellungen darüber, wie Befehlsverweigerungen von SS-Männern und Polizeiangehörigen, die im Zusammenhang mit der Erschiessung von Zivilpersonen stehen, disziplinarisch geahndet oder auch nicht geahndet wurden, lassen sich jedoch nur in stark eingeschränktem Masse auf die Verhältnisse der Angeklagten Franz, Matthes, Miete, Mentz, Münzberger, Suchomel, Stadie, Lambert und Ru. übertragen; denn die einzelnen Befehlsverweigerungen ereigneten sich nicht in einem Vernichtungslager und nicht im Raume Lublin, sondern in ganz anderen Gebieten und unter ganz anderen Gegebenheiten. Zudem waren sie den Angeklagten zur Tatzeit nicht bekannt, so dass sie ihr Verhalten keineswegs danach ausrichten konnten. Für die Angeklagten selbst kommt es deshalb in der Hauptsache darauf an, ob für sie in Treblinka objektiv eine Zwangs- und Notstandslage bestanden hat. Das Schwurgericht hat deshalb seine besondere Aufmerksamkeit der Persönlichkeit des Inspekteurs Christian Wirth zugewandt, von dem diese Zwangs- und Notstandslage nach der Darstellung der Angeklagten allein ausgegangen sein soll.

David Thompson
Forum Staff
Posts: 23283
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: Were the guards ever threatened to do what they had to??

Post by David Thompson » 04 Mar 2010 22:01

So far, in multiple discussions extending over the past seven years here, no poster has been able to give any examples of German officers or men who were executed for refusing to obey criminal orders. Officers who refused to carry out such orders were only reassigned, and in some cases, their disobedience was simply ignored. Justice Musmanno gives a number of examples in the "Duress" section of the judgment in the "Einsatzgruppen case" at http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 8#p1102078

See also the discussions in judgments from other trials in:

The defense of Superior Orders
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=126214

There are certainly a large number of examples of German generals (von Manstein, Guderian, etc.) who refused to obey lawful (but ill-conceived) military orders from the Fuehrer, but these officers were usually dismissed, not shot.

The same is true of enlisted men. A number of concentration camp guards and staff members weren't prosecuted, or were acquitted by allied war crimes tribunals because the witnesses -- former inmates -- gave statements that the defendant was a decent man who didn't mistreat, and often helped, the prisoners.

Similarly, in the trial of former members of Reserve Police Battalion 101 there were statements that members of the unit who did not participate in mass executions of Jewish civilians were assigned other duties, not punished. See Christopher R. Browning, Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland (1992), pp. 56-57, 62-63, for example.

JamesL
Member
Posts: 1647
Joined: 28 Oct 2004 00:03
Location: NJ USA

Re: War crimes of the 14th SS Division

Post by JamesL » 22 Mar 2010 19:36

If a Ukrainian private was "ordered" to shoot someone by his senoir GERMAN commander, what should he do? refuse and be shot for disobeying orders or shoot as ordered to?

I think 7 German judges in Munich are trying to come up with an answer for that question.

David Thompson
Forum Staff
Posts: 23283
Joined: 20 Jul 2002 19:52
Location: USA

Re: War crimes of the 14th SS Division

Post by David Thompson » 22 Mar 2010 21:53

JamesL -- You wrote, quoting Melnyk:
If a Ukrainian private was "ordered" to shoot someone by his senoir GERMAN commander, what should he do? refuse and be shot for disobeying orders or shoot as ordered to?
I think 7 German judges in Munich are trying to come up with an answer for that question.
For more than seven years as a moderator here, whenever this claim has been raised, I've asked the posters for specific examples. In that 7+ years, no one has been able to come up with an example where German (or foreign) soldiers were shot for refusing to obey illegal orders to kill or mistreat civilians. There are a number of documented instances where reluctant troops or equally reluctant officers were given other assignments, but none in which the soldiers were executed.

The real question is, how accurate is this hypothetical situation? If it's accurate, it needs documentation. If it's inaccurate, it needs abandonment. See the discussion at http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=159649 and the links available there, among many other threads in the H&WC section. If either you or Mike Melnyk have any documented examples of German (or foreign) soldiers being executed for refusing to obey illegal orders to kill or mistreat civilians, our readers and I would be interested in seeing them.

Ypenburg
Member
Posts: 535
Joined: 28 Jul 2006 20:45

Re: War crimes of the 14th SS Division

Post by Ypenburg » 23 Mar 2010 01:11

David Thompson wrote: For more than seven years as a moderator here, whenever this claim has been raised, I've asked the posters for specific examples. In that 7+ years, no one has been able to come up with an example where German (or foreign) soldiers were shot for refusing to obey illegal orders to kill or mistreat civilians. There are a number of documented instances where reluctant troops or equally reluctant officers were given other assignments, but none in which the soldiers were executed.
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 3&t=137305
Had forgotten about another Luftwaffe hero, but found it again today:

Sanitäts-Feldwebel Ernst Gräwe : http://www.wehrmacht-awards.com/forums/ ... p?t=217506

Gräwe's name mentioned on the monument:
http://www.4en5mei.nl/content/241364/de ... olmonument

This eye-withness mentions Gräwe being shot in the head by his Co":
http://www.destentor.nl/regio/deventer/ ... 1&sort=asc

Return to “Holocaust & 20th Century War Crimes”