Japan court rejects germ warfare case

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Marcus
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Japan court rejects germ warfare case

Post by Marcus » 27 Aug 2002 17:45

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A Japanese court has rejected claims for compensation brought by 180 Chinese people who claim they were victims of Japan's biological warfare unit in China in the 1940s.
The group had sued the Japanese Government, demanding an apology for its use of germ warfare against Chinese citizens and ten million yen ($84,000) each in compensation.
But the three judges did acknowledge the facts of the case, the first time a Japanese court has admitted Japan conducted biological warfare during World War II.
The court ruled that under international law, individuals had no right to seek compensation from a state.
...
Evidence was given at the trial that 3,000 people were killed by plague and cholera cultivated by Japanese military scientists during World War II.
For five years, the Tokyo district court heard harrowing testimony about Japan's Unit 731, which developed biological weapons for use against Chinese civilians and carried out experiments and vivisections on them.
Witnesses told how Japanese aircraft sprayed a mixture of fleas and wheat grain over villagers in eastern China in 1940 and 1941.
Shortly afterwards there were outbreaks of bubonic plague in which hundreds died.
A former member of Unit 731 told how he had worked to cultivate plague, cholera and anthrax.
He said he had helped infect Chinese prisoners with the germs and had assisted surgeons who then cut them up alive.
The plaintiffs wanted the Japanese Government to acknowledge the existence of the unit and to give details of its activities.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/asia-p ... 218266.stm

/Marcus

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The Desert Fox
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Japans war crimes.

Post by The Desert Fox » 31 Aug 2002 06:57

Yes a pretty pathetic outcome.

Its a very sad reality that in the interest of cold war politics Japan recieved far too much protection for its war crimes from the USA government. The same could not be said of Germany.

Many crimes against commonwealth Pow's went unpunished due to USA interference with post war trials of Japenese military.

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Marcus
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Re: Japans war crimes.

Post by Marcus » 31 Aug 2002 08:10

The Desert Fox wrote:Yes a pretty pathetic outcome.


Yes and no, at least a Japanese court has admitted Japan conducted biological warfare during the war.

/Marcus

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Limited merit is warrented

Post by The Desert Fox » 01 Sep 2002 02:46

Yes I suppose their is some limited merit in that. The Japenese rarely own up to past misdeeds due to the Bushido principle of keeping face. That the Court actually admited that it took place is a step forward. However it doesnt help the misfortuate fools who surived it.

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Post by kobold » 01 Sep 2002 07:03

What was the outcome of the "Comfort Women" trials from a few years ago?



Dave

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Comfort women compensation

Post by The Desert Fox » 01 Sep 2002 12:40

I am not definitely sure but I think some actually where awarded some compensation.

I recall seeing a documentary about a Dutch women from former Dutch East Indies (present day Indonesia) and her court battle with the Japenese government. I think she won her case. It was about 18 months ago.

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Thanks Marcus for good post

Post by wildboar » 10 Sep 2002 16:53

Marcus,
thanks for good post.
indeed japanese warcrimes are shielded by allies due to coldwar politics as compared to nazi crimes.

Marcus when I asked Indian veterans of wwii about treatment of pows by opponents the all of them said that the japanese tretment of pows was worst and cruel as compared to german one.
in fact according to them german treatment of pows was far superior than japanese one.


cheers

wildboar

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Roberto
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Re: Thanks Marcus for good post

Post by Roberto » 10 Sep 2002 17:19

wildboar wrote:Marcus,
thanks for good post.
indeed japanese warcrimes are shielded by allies due to coldwar politics as compared to nazi crimes.

Marcus when I asked Indian veterans of wwii about treatment of pows by opponents the all of them said that the japanese tretment of pows was worst and cruel as compared to german one.
in fact according to them german treatment of pows was far superior than japanese one.


cheers

wildboar


That's not exactly surprising as those Indians served in the British Army and were thus entitled to the treatment given British prisoners of war. It would have been very different if they had served in the Soviet army.

The figures speak for themselves:

What happened to the Soviet prisoners of war in the years between 1941 and 1945 has been largely ignored. A total of approximately 5.7 million Red Army soldiers were taken prisoner between June 22, 1941, and the end of the war. In January 1945, there were some 930,000 Soviet POWs left in the prison camps of the Wehrmacht. About 1 million more had been released from captivity, most of them as so-called “Hilfswillige”, that is, helpers of the Wehrmacht. According to estimates from the German Army staff, another 500,000 of the prisoners either had escaped or were eventually liberated by the Red Army.
The remaining 3,300,000 or about 57 percent of the total number, had perished by 1945. To make these figures more meaningful, they should be compared with statistics on the British and American prisoners of war. Of the total of 231,000 such prisoners in German hands, 8,348 or 3.6 percent, died before the end of the war.


Source of quote:

Christian Streit, The Fate of Soviet Prisoners of War, published in: A Mosaic of Victims. Non-Jews Persecuted and Murdered by the Nazis. Edited by Michael Berenbaum. New York University Press, 1990.

P.O.Ws. 7,310 British prisoners of war died while in German captivity and 12,443 British prisoners of war died while in Japanese captivity. Of an estimated 350,000 prisoners captured by the Japanese in WW11, 35,756 died, a death rate of 27%. Of the 235,473 prisoners interned by Germany and Italy, 9,348 died, a death rate of 4%.


Source of quote:

http://members.iinet.net.au/~gduncan/Facts-2.html

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wildboar
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Roberto,some clarifications

Post by wildboar » 10 Sep 2002 17:36

Roberto wrote,

That's not exactly surprising as those Indians served in the British Army and were thus entitled to the treatment given British prisoners of war. It would have been very different if they had served in the Soviet army
.


Roberto here i would like to clarify that indian army itself was a different organisation and not part of british army as said, it was paid by taxes paid by indians to colonial government and not by any taxes paid by british citizens also at that time it was called as ROYAL INDIAN ARMY and covered by INDIAN ARMY ACT so technically all the indians were comrades of britishers being member of commonwealth and they were technically not part of british army.

considering that indian army was completely different organisation the treatment given to indian pows was much better as compared to japanese and roberto above all it was german civilians especially during closing phases of war who treated indian pows well and it was indian pows who built foundation indo-german trade links after war but thats different story[/b]

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Roberto
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Re: Roberto,some clarifications

Post by Roberto » 10 Sep 2002 18:30

wildboar wrote:Roberto wrote,

That's not exactly surprising as those Indians served in the British Army and were thus entitled to the treatment given British prisoners of war. It would have been very different if they had served in the Soviet army
.


Roberto here i would like to clarify that indian army itself was a different organisation and not part of british army as said, it was paid by taxes paid by indians to colonial government and not by any taxes paid by british citizens also at that time it was called as ROYAL INDIAN ARMY and covered by INDIAN ARMY ACT so technically all the indians were comrades of britishers being member of commonwealth and they were technically not part of british army.

considering that indian army was completely different organisation the treatment given to indian pows was much better as compared to japanese and roberto above all it was german civilians especially during closing phases of war who treated indian pows well and it was indian pows who built foundation indo-german trade links after war but thats different story[/b]


I stand corrected on the legal status of the Royal Indian Army, thanks.

I also expect the Germans to have given prisoners from countries belonging to the British Commonwealth the same treatment that they gave British prisoners.

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