Photos from the Russo-Japanese War

Discussions on all aspects of the Japanese Empire, from the capture of Taiwan until the end of the Second World War.

User avatar
Peter H
Member
Posts: 28628
Joined: 30 Dec 2002 13:18
Location: Australia

Post by Peter H » 20 Jul 2006 09:09


Eugen Pinak
Member
Posts: 872
Joined: 16 Jun 2004 16:09
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Post by Eugen Pinak » 20 Jul 2006 11:20

Great photos!

User avatar
spiro
Financial supporter
Posts: 188
Joined: 16 Jul 2005 15:48
Location: Greece

Post by spiro » 20 Jul 2006 23:14

Excuse my ignorance but are the people on the 2nd photo Japanese officers?

Eugen Pinak
Member
Posts: 872
Joined: 16 Jun 2004 16:09
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Post by Eugen Pinak » 21 Jul 2006 07:20

Yes, they are all officers.

User avatar
spiro
Financial supporter
Posts: 188
Joined: 16 Jul 2005 15:48
Location: Greece

Post by spiro » 21 Jul 2006 23:00

Thanks Eugen

The reason I asked was the swords they are carrying.
They look like "western" swords wile I thought the all carried the katana-or did this happened sometime later?

User avatar
Lawrence
Member
Posts: 715
Joined: 02 Apr 2002 02:12

Post by Lawrence » 21 Jul 2006 23:10

spiro wrote:Thanks Eugen

The reason I asked was the swords they are carrying.
They look like "western" swords wile I thought the all carried the katana-or did this happened sometime later?


As far as I know, early swords resembled European sabers, as Japan was emulating the West heavily. The kyu-gunto or 'First Military Sword' was introduced in 1875 for officers and 1886 for warrant officers. The blade was slightly curved with a handguard.

Some traditional Samurai swords, normally family heirlooms, were worn during the Meiji and Taisho eras. During the rise of nationalism in the early Showa era, a demand for a 'Japanese' style sword increased and in 1934 the Type 94 shin-gunto or 'New Military Sword' was introduced. It was a copy of old Samurai katanas.

User avatar
Fallschirmjäger
Member
Posts: 2261
Joined: 02 Sep 2005 04:12
Location: New Zealand

Ex samuri warriors

Post by Fallschirmjäger » 22 Jul 2006 04:39

I wonder how many where ex samuri warriors,or was that to far back realy,but this was the 1900's and they where still fighting like that not to long before?.

User avatar
Lawrence
Member
Posts: 715
Joined: 02 Apr 2002 02:12

Re: Ex samuri warriors

Post by Lawrence » 22 Jul 2006 04:45

Fallschirmjäger: wrote:I wonder how many where ex samuri warriors,or was that to far back realy,but this was the 1900's and they where still fighting like that not to long before?.


I don't understand your question.

User avatar
Fallschirmjäger
Member
Posts: 2261
Joined: 02 Sep 2005 04:12
Location: New Zealand

?

Post by Fallschirmjäger » 22 Jul 2006 05:33

Why?,are they ex samuri warriors i said,why do people not get what i wright sometimes and mainly from the usa,i think its my broken english style of writing and grammar?.
:?

User avatar
13thredarmy
Member
Posts: 63
Joined: 28 Sep 2003 15:08
Location: Picton, New Zealand

Post by 13thredarmy » 22 Jul 2006 08:54

People shouldn't get too hung up on the idea of being 'samurai'.

It is and was a social class nothing more. Some were soldiers but they could just as easily be policemen, lawyers, farmers, merchants, pimps or beggars.

Theidea that they some warrior caste is a pretty recent bit of propaganda.

User avatar
Fallschirmjäger
Member
Posts: 2261
Joined: 02 Sep 2005 04:12
Location: New Zealand

Im not

Post by Fallschirmjäger » 22 Jul 2006 09:48

Im not to hung up on it at all,just curious at the time.

User avatar
spiro
Financial supporter
Posts: 188
Joined: 16 Jul 2005 15:48
Location: Greece

Post by spiro » 22 Jul 2006 22:34

Kingsley wrote:As far as I know, early swords resembled European sabers, as Japan was emulating the West heavily. The kyu-gunto or 'First Military Sword' was introduced in 1875 for officers and 1886 for warrant officers. The blade was slightly curved with a handguard.

Some traditional Samurai swords, normally family heirlooms, were worn during the Meiji and Taisho eras. During the rise of nationalism in the early Showa era, a demand for a 'Japanese' style sword increased and in 1934 the Type 94 shin-gunto or 'New Military Sword' was introduced. It was a copy of old Samurai katanas.


Thanks for your very informative post.

User avatar
Lawrence
Member
Posts: 715
Joined: 02 Apr 2002 02:12

Post by Lawrence » 23 Jul 2006 03:43

Here's a few others.

General Nogi and staff officers.

Image

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... nogilg.jpg

Landing at Chemulpo (Inchon)

Image

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... chonlg.jpg

Japanese Infantry

Image

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... armylg.jpg

Caricatures of the major figures

Image

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... 1649Lg.jpg

Japanese soldiers helping a wounded Russian

Image

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... RussLg.jpg

There is more from this following website, loaded with tons of pictures and great information.

http://process.portsmouthpeacetreaty.or ... index.html

Eugen Pinak
Member
Posts: 872
Joined: 16 Jun 2004 16:09
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Re: Ex samuri warriors

Post by Eugen Pinak » 24 Jul 2006 07:28

Fallschirmjäger: wrote:I wonder how many where ex samuri warriors,or was that to far back realy,but this was the 1900's and they where still fighting like that not to long before?.

Well, most of the older officers (that is, age 50 and older) were from samurai families.

Return to “Japan at War 1895-1945”