Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Discussions on all aspects of the Japanese Empire, from the capture of Taiwan until the end of the Second World War.
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Takao
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Takao » 03 Mar 2010 03:17

The USS Stewart is probably the most well known of captured WWII vessels put back into use under the Japanese flag.

British:
HMS Thracian - destroyer

Dutch:
HNLMS Valk
HNLMS Banckert
HNLMS Arend
HNLMS Fazant

United States:
USS Stewart
USS Finch
USS Genesse
Arayat
SS President Harrison

-Not sure if this is all of them, but the ones that I remember.

stulev
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by stulev » 03 Mar 2010 15:37

I think that some captured Chinese ships were used by the Japanese navy along with captured merchant ships

Rick the Librarian
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Rick the Librarian » 23 Apr 2010 23:34

The Japanese captured large amounts of American equipment. Here is a table of that captured to about mid-Febraury 1942.

The 31 tanks mentioned were captured all at one time when an American tank unit was trapped by a premature destruction of a critical bridge and the tanks had to be abandoned. Supposedly, at least one (as was mentioned earlier) was used on the attack on Corregidor. The table is taken from Lous Morton's The Fall of the Philippines book.

Image

As for the thousands of M1917 rifles (as many has 220,000 were sold to the Philippines by the U.S. in the late 1930s - interestingly, the money that came from the sale was invested in the M1 Garand program), at least some were supposedly used by the Japanese 16th Division, on garrison duty in the Philippines. Some reports have them using them against U.S. forces in 1944 on Leyte.

Here is another picture taken from a Japanese "yearbook" type publication, showing a huge stack of M1917 rifles, probably taken from a surrendering Filipino unit at Mariveles in April, 1942. If you look carefully, you can also see a couple of M1 Garands, a number of M1917 Browning HMGs, some 50. caliber guns on anti-aircraft mounts and row of captured artiullery, probably 18-pounder guns.

Image

"For the record", (this being my first post on this website), I've had a lifelong interest in Bataan and Corregidor and have published several articles.

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Peter H
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Peter H » 24 Apr 2010 09:15

Welcome to the forum Rick.Thanks for the information.

Peter

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Zaf1
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Zaf1 » 24 Apr 2010 12:18

Hi Rick

That's a useful information Thanks for adding more valuable knowledge.

Regards

Zaf

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Sewer King
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Sewer King » 24 Apr 2010 13:46

Welcome to the Forum, Rick! We hope you will continue to join in. Other published authors about Bataan are here on this forum too. If you haven't already, you might look up their contributions here, as well as list your own works together with theirs.

My father was a Death March survivor, at age 88 now one of the last, who had fought with one of those M1917 Enfield rifles in the Philippine Commonwealth Army.

==============================

A while ago there was some discussion of early M1 Garand use in the fall of the Philippines. In it we had wondered about this photo of the captured US ordnance. Thanks for the wider-angle view.
  • I would think that the Japanese had a good opinion of the Garand, and not simply in that their Navy made the Type 5 copy of it. The Germans felt similarly after capturing Soviet Tokarev rifles, and issued their Kar 43, though with more success than the Type 5.

    It was not only the disadvantages of Japan's industry, compared to those of her enemies and allies. The ordnance offices of many leading armies have often fought against good new rifle designs that threaten their set ways, economies, and politics.
Peter H wrote:US defeat in the Philippines (pictorial magazine cover)
Image
This victory tableau with an M1 Garand is interesting for showing a US flag tied to it in the manner of the Japanese yosegaki.

It is the only close-up photo I have seen of an M1 captured by the Japanese. Does anyone know of photos showing Japanese troops actually holding Garands, like our earlier ones of Australian or British rifles?

-- Alan

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Zaf1
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Zaf1 » 24 Apr 2010 18:29

Rick,

It would be a good thing if you could publish a book on this. It seems that the Philippines campaign 1941-42 is one of the "forgotten battles" of WW2.

Regards

Zaf

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Ron Sundby
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Ron Sundby » 25 Apr 2010 02:49

Two of the American Yangtze river gunboats were captured and pressed into service by the IJN. Two others, USS Oahu and USS Mindanao, were successfully scuttled in the Philippines in May '42.

USS Wake
Shallow-draft River Gunboat: Laid down by the Kiangnan Dock and Engineering Works, Shanghai, China; Launched, 28 May 1927; Commissioned USS Guam (PG-43), 28 December 1927; Reclassified as a River Gunboat, PR-3, 15 June 1928; Renamed Wake in January 1941; Surrendered to Japanese forces at Shanghai, 8 December 1941; Struck from the Naval Register, 25 March 1942; Renamed HIJNS Tatara by Japan; Recovered by U.S. forces in August 1945; Transferred to Nationalist China in 1946 and renamed RCS Tai Yuan; Captured by Communist Chinese forces in 1949. Fate unknown.
Specifications: Displacement 350 t; Length 159' 5"; Beam 27' 1"; Draft 5' 3"(mean); Speed 14.5 kts; Complement 59; Armament two 3" gun mounts, eight .30 cal. Lewis machine guns; Propulsion two 950hp triple expansion steam engines, two shafts.

USS Luzon
Shallow-draft River Gunboat: Laid down 20 November 1926 by Kiangnan Docking and Engineering Works, Shanghai China; Launched 12 September 1927; Commissioned 1 June 1928; Reclassified as a River Gunboat, PR-7, 15 June 1928; Scuttled in Manila Bay to prevent capture 6 May 1942; Struck from the Naval Register 8 May 1942; Salvaged by Japan and renamed IJNS Karatzu (sometimes Karatsu); Sunk 3 March 1944 by USS Narwhal (SS-167).
Specifications: Displacement 500 t; Length 210' 9"; Beam 31'; Draft 6' (mean); Speed 16 kts; Complement 80; Armament two 3"/50 gun mounts, ten .30-cal Lewis Machine Guns; Propulsion two 950hp triple expansion steam engines, two shafts.

Merchant shipping in the Philippines Put into use by the Japanese during WWII.
The inter-island fleet as of 1940:

Code: Select all

Type               Number  Average Tonnage  Total Tonnage
Steamers              62         580               36,000
Sailboats          1,515          18               27,000
Small boats*       1,970          46               91,613       
Total              3,547                          154,613
*(scows, lighters, and launches w/ steam, diesel, or gasoline engines)
The steamers were scuttled by USAFFE, but raised and refitted by September ‘43. An estimated 40 of the 62 pre-war steamers were salvaged and put back into service for military/naval service in war zones outside of the Philippines. The rest were broken up for scrap metal. Older wooden vessels of less than 60 tons capacity became the standard for inter-island shipping.
(Sicat Gerardo P., The Philippine Economy During the Japanese Occupation 1941-1945, Quezon City, University of the Philippines 2003)
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john whitman
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by john whitman » 25 Apr 2010 10:48

The Bataan campaign is forgotten no longer.
See Bataan: Our Last Ditch, Hippocrene 1990, now regarded as the definitive history of the Bataan campaign. Full disclosure, author is John W. Whitman.

John

Rick the Librarian
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by Rick the Librarian » 26 Apr 2010 14:57

Are you the same "John Whitman"?? The book mentioned (in my opinion) is the "defining" book on the Bataan/Corregidor campaign. An absolutely fabulous book, which I have recommended to numerous friends and associates.

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nuyt
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by nuyt » 27 Dec 2010 15:44

Peter H wrote:M1919 Browning in use
Are we sure this is a Browning? I think it may be a Japanese Navy Type 97 7,7mm Vickers mg
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nuyt
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by nuyt » 27 Dec 2010 15:45

Rick the Librarian wrote:
Here is another picture taken from a Japanese "yearbook" type publication, showing a huge stack of M1917 rifles, probably taken from a surrendering Filipino unit at Mariveles in April, 1942. If you look carefully, you can also see a couple of M1 Garands, a number of M1917 Browning HMGs, some 50. caliber guns on anti-aircraft mounts and row of captured artiullery, probably 18-pounder guns.

Image
Not 18pdrs but 75mm

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nuyt
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by nuyt » 27 Dec 2010 15:53

Some weaponry, a lot can be found on the AWM site.
A 25dr, 3.7 inchs AA guns, a 2 pdrs (all Borneo recovered), Bofors 40mm on Kaimana (NNG)
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nuyt
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by nuyt » 27 Dec 2010 15:54

the rest
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nuyt
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Re: Japanese Use of Captured Equipment

Post by nuyt » 30 Dec 2010 19:23

pictures of Japanese equipment found on New Britain
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