Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

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Peter H
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 27 Jul 2009 23:33

A recent article in WW II Magazine about the battle:

Mongolia 1939 - Stalin’s Shrewd Opening Act
http://www.historynet.com/mongolia-1939 ... ng-act.htm



Officer below identified as Major Kanaizuka,commanded 3rd Battalion of the 64th Infantry Regiment.During the ceasefire he spoke with a Soviet officer and was farewelled with the words "see you here again next year".
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 27 Jul 2009 23:35

From WW2 in Color.

More Japanese captured.
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 27 Jul 2009 23:37

Soviet photos of knocked out Japanese tanks
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 27 Jul 2009 23:39

Captured Japanese equipment
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 28 Jul 2009 08:25

Re the Stuart Goldman article posted above:
In April 1939, Maj. Masanobu Tsuji, the notorious and sometimes brilliant senior officer of the army’s operations staff, drafted an inflammatory set of principles for dealing with the border skirmishes that had been troubling the desolate region since Japan seized Manchuria in 1931 and 1932 and renamed it Manchukuo. Worded to provoke rather than settle such disputes, Tsuji’s principles declared that “where boundaries are not clearly defined, area commanders will establish boundaries on their own”; that in the event of an armed clash the army will “fight until victory is won, regardless of…the location of boundaries”; and, finally, that “it is permissible to enter Soviet territory, or to trap or lure Soviet troops into Manchukuoan territory.”
In fact the offensive reaction directive was Outline for Dealing With Disputes Along the Manchuria-Soviet Border approved by Hirohito shortly before the incident happened.Tsuji was legitimately followed orders from above and was not acting like a renegade pushing his own agenda.

According to Hirohito's postwar comment on the matter as recorded in Herbert Bix's Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan:
..Because the Soviet-Manchukuo border in the Nomonhan area is not clearly demarcated,both sides made false accusations of illegal enroachment.Since an imperial command had been issued to Ueda Kenkichi,the Kwantung Army commander,to strictly defend the Manchukuo border,there was a reason why the Kwantung Army engaged the invading Soviet troops in battle..Later the orders were changed so that they did not have to rigorously defend the border in undefined or remote areas..
It appears that promoting Tsuji as a loose wheel,someone outside the chain of command,and magnifying his "notoriety" overpromotes the influence this relatively junior officer had.This was not Manchuria 1931,but 8 years later,where a greater Imperial and GHQ control was being utilised.

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Peter H
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 28 Jul 2009 23:24

From visualrian.ru

Soviet officers
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 28 Jul 2009 23:47

From: nbuv.gov.ua

Nomonhan or Lake Khasan?
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by cloudy-joe » 29 Jul 2009 10:55

Nomonhan or Lake Khasan?
Lake Khasan. Poster is devoted to the feat of the Hero of Soviet Union Ivan Davydovich Chernopiatko (1914-1947). During the battle he tooked command of the rifle company. He was woonded twice, but continued fighting.

Image

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Peter H
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 29 Jul 2009 23:56

Thanks Joe.

Another interesting article.

Japanese intelligence and the Soviet-Japanese border conflicts in the 1930s
http://www.nids.go.jp/dissemination/sen ... 803/09.pdf

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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 31 Jul 2009 12:09

Aviators:

Yoshiyama Bunji
20 victories.On the 20th August he forced a Soviet fighter to make an emergency landing.Yoshiyama landed next to him and shot the Soviet pilot dead,taking his Tokarev pistol and wristwatch as a souvenir.Disappeared on the 15th September 1939 while flying a bomber escort mission.


From: http://www.forosegundaguerra.com/viewto ... ?f=52&t=92

Yoshiyama holds the Tokarev pistol he captured
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 31 Jul 2009 12:15

Shinohara Hiromichi

Called the 'Richtofen of the Orient'.58 victories claimed Nomonhan.Claimed 11 shot down on a single day,27th June 1939.Killed on the 27th August 1939.
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 31 Jul 2009 12:28

Hitoshi Asano
22 victories.In 2006 he claimed in an interview he landed next to a downed Soviet fighter and killed the pilot with his sword.Survived the war and became a Buddhist priest.Still alive I think.
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 31 Jul 2009 13:32

The Soviet air threat
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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by cloudy-joe » 31 Jul 2009 15:42

I think, we must very critically treat of the numbers of Japanese aces «claimed» victories in the sky of Nomonhan.
If we sum up all of them, the total number of losses of USSR will be more, than 1000 (!) airplanes.

Official data from soviet archives: total losses of VVS RKKA in Nomonhan conflict – 209 airplanes (missing in action).
Including: May – 17, June – 45, July – 77, August – 56, September – 14
By types: I-15bis – 56, I-16 –78, I-16P – 12, I-153 – 16, SB - 46, R-5 - 1
May be, this data is not complete, but it`s close to the truth.

Number of victories of soviet pilots in Nomonhan conflict - about 250 japanese airplanes.

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Re: Nomonhan/Khalkhin Gol photos

Post by Peter H » 01 Aug 2009 12:44

According to here: http://forum.12oclockhigh.net/showthread.php?t=16090
...the losses during the Khalkin-Gol fighting in the summer of 1939, they were, AFAIK (these figures are most probably approximate only), the following :

- 164 Japanes airplanes (among them 93 Ki-27s and 3 Ki-10s), without breakdown between combat and non combat losses (Soviet claims were 645, including 590 in flight). But I have no detailed source.

- 145 Soviet planes in combat. And 60 more to other causes. (Japanese claims were 1260). Again, no detailed source for material losses, but what can be held for reasonably accurate is that 100 VVS personnel died, 59 went missing, and 102 were wounded.

Most (70%) Japanese losses were suffered in the last month of the conflict, while Soviet ones are apparently more equally distributed between June and September. One can already see that the high overclaiming rates which was later often seen in the Asian combat zone during WWII...

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