Chinese troops in Japanese service

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asiaticus
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Chinese troops in Japanese service

Post by asiaticus » 27 Jan 2005 23:03

From my reading of the Osprey bookon the Chinese Civil War Armies 1911-49 it seems that Chinese troops in Japanese service belonged to one of three puppet states, Provisional Government in Peking from 1937 (41,000men), Reformed Nationalists in Nanjing from 1938 (30,000men). and Inner Mongolia from 1937(18,000men). Later all were consolidated under Wang Jin Wei's Government in 1940 and eventually reached the strength of 900,000 men between the regular forces and militia. Apparently they were poorly armed and equipped. Artillery being withheld and ammo supplies kept low so they could not be taken to the guerillas if a unit deserted.

Does anyone know the size and type of units the regular forces were organized into? Did they acheive the status of Corps, Divisions. Brigades, etc

Any idea how they and / or the militias were organized and equipped?

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Post by Goldfish » 28 Jan 2005 15:57

The author of that Osprey title, Philip Jowett, has written another book called "Rays of the Rising Sun" that should provide the insignia and uniform details you are looking for. As for organization, I think that it varied greatly based on a variety of factors. From things I have read, it seems that the main job of the puppet armies was internal pacification, especially in areas under Communist influence. The Japanese Army in China, although large, was not big enough to defend what if had won and still launch fresh attacks. Consequently, the Japanese would leave pacification, crop confiscation, and a lot of the other "dirty work" to puppet troops, leaving the Japanese with a mass of maneuver with which to launch fresh attacks or shift troops to defend vital areas. After the Pacific War started, Japan was steadily forced to drain China of troops and came to rely more and more on puppet troops to fill the gap. However, as the tide of war turned against Japan, puppet troops were more reluctant to follow Japanese instructions.

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Post by asiaticus » 28 Jan 2005 18:29

You say organization varied widely. Do you have some sample organizations for these units? I know how the Japanese, Manchukuo and KMT were set up. Were these the models or were there others?

Thanks for that lead on the other book.

George.

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