Attempted assassination of Emperor 1932

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Peter H
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Attempted assassination of Emperor 1932

Post by Peter H » 22 Sep 2005 04:02

Seeking information on Lee Bong Chang and his attempt to assassinate the Emperor in Tokyo 1932.

Also in April 1932 at Shanghai the Korean" Yun Pong-Gil threw a bomb at a Japanese ceremony in Hingkew Park killing several Japanese officials and wounding scores of others, including the top military man in China, Gen. Shirakawa (who was to sign the surrender document in 1945, with one leg crippled by Yun's bomb)."

Yun Pong-Gil under arrest
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http://www.kimsoft.com/2000/kimgu428.jpg

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Lt.Amuro
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Post by Lt.Amuro » 22 Sep 2005 04:23

Gen.Yoshinori Shirakawa the commander of Shanghai Dispatched Army was dead several days later.
Who was to sign the surrender document in 1945 is Mamoru Shigemitsu(Diplomat). He was also there and lost one leg.
9th division commander Kenkichi Ueda was also injured at that time. He became the commander of Kwangtung Army later, and faced the Nomonham Incident.

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 22 Sep 2005 05:27

Thankyou for that---know I know why Mamoru Shigemitsu had a cane with him aboard USS Missouri.

Mamoru Shigemitsu with top hat,cane 1945.
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http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/imag ... c02719.jpg

Regards,
Peter

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 22 Sep 2005 05:33

Details on Lee Bong-chang:
Lee Bong-chang (1900~1932)A highly principled fighter of the national independence movement, he graduated from Yongsan Munchang General School. He went to Shanghai in 1931 to start out as a leader of the national independence movement. Recruited by Mr. Kim Ku as a member of the Korean Patriotic Society, he was the one who carried out the plan to assassinate the Hirohito. On January 8, 1932, when the Japanese emperor Hirohito was on his way back after a military parade at the Yoyoki Army Base, he threw a hand grenade at the Sakurata gate. The first hit the wrong carriage, but though the second was on target it was unfortunately a dud. Lee failed and was arrested on the spot.
He was executed on October 1932 at Ichigaya Prison. But his rise against the Japanese Empire lit up the nationwide independence movement. The Chinese Nationalist government organ reported, ‘Korean independence movement leader Lee Bongchang’s attempt to assassinate the Japanese Emperor unfortunately ended in failure’.
This strained the relationship between Japan and China and finally ignited the Shanghai Incident. His body is enshrined in the Three Righteous Men’s Grave inside Park Hyo-chang. (His birthplace is located at 118-1, Hyochang-dong).
And Yun Bong-gil:
Yun Bong-gil (1908~1932)
A patriot and a martyr, Yun Bong-gil was engaged in the reconstruction of rural communities, including campaigning for rural community enlightenment, rural community reconstruction and book-reading in 1926. Exiled to Manchuria in 1930, he went to Shanghai in 1931 to meet Kim Ku, the leader of the Korean Provisional Government, and participated in the national independence movement.
Joining the Korean Patriots Organization on April 26, 1932, Yun threw a bomb at the ceremonial place for the birthday of the Japanese Emperor, whereby no Chinese are allowed to attend, to kill Japanese soldiers, including the Commander of Japanese Forces in Shanghai. Yun was arrested at the site and taken to Japan to be executed by firing squad on December 19, 1932.
The Chinese in Shanghai were deeply appreciative of Yun’s heroic act and all ethnic Koreans in Shanghai were given free meals for a month.
His body was buried in the tomb at Hyochang Park for the three patriots. The epitaph for the tomb reads, ‘Here sleeps three martyrs who sacrificed their young lives for the national liberation. Their name, fidelity and spirit dedicated to the altar of the national independence will remain alive forever in every heart of Korean people.’
http://www.nowhere.per.sg/?cat=4

Disregarding the hyperbole they both appeared to have been recruited by Kim Ku.More on the trio here:

http://www.yongsan.seoul.kr/eng/culture/c_body.asp

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 22 Sep 2005 05:41

Herbert Bix indicates that the Chinese press response to the assassination attempt infuriated some sections of the Japanese military and the battle of Shanghai 1932 hence followed:
Tensions in Shanghai had begun after Japanese residents took umbrage at a Chinese newspaper article, on January 9, decrying the failure of the assassination attempt on the Showa emperor. Nine days later army Major Tanaka Ryukichi, hoping to divert foreign attention from the army's operations in northern Manchuria, instigated an attack by a Chinese mob on a group of Japanese Nichiren priests. The Imperial Navy found this incident a tempting chance to demonstrate its prowess to the army. The Shanghai fleet was quickly reinforced and on January 28, 1932, marines under Rear Adm. Shiozawa Koichi went ashore and that night challenged China's Nineteenth Route Army--a 33,500-man force stationed in the vicinity of the International Settlement, which ran along the waterfront. In the ensuing battle the Chinese gave the Japanese marines a good thrashing. Unable to retrieve the situation despite reinforcements from the fleet, the navy had to call on the army for help. But the Chinese army still held firm and again inflicted heavy losses. The high command in Tokyo then organized a full-fledged Shanghai Expeditionary Force under General Shirakawa and reinforced it with two full divisions. Intense fighting ensued; the Chinese finally fell back, and Japan was able to announce a face-saving cease-fire, followed by an armistice, negotiated with British participation on May 5, 1932, which also ended the Chinese boycott.

The Shanghai Incident should have awakened Hirohito to the recklessness and aggressiveness of his senior admirals--the very officers he and the court group regarded as sophisticated, cosmopolitan men of the world. Driven by service rivalry, they had deliberately sought a confrontation with Chinese forces in the heartland of China, knowing that problems with the United States and Britain were sure to result. Equally important, this incident was an unlearned lesson for both military services. Neither army nor navy drew any new conclusions from the heavy losses they incurred in this first large battle with a modern Chinese army.
Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan,page 250.

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Post by Kim Sung » 23 Sep 2005 14:54

I personally know Patriot Yoon Bong Gil 윤봉길's nephew(actually, a son of Yoon's cousin who is still alive and 93 years old now). He was a professor of Communications Department, Korea University and is the head of the most famous civic organization in Korea now.

I made a telephone call to him about this post and he said that he would post something in this post soon. He has been already a member of this forum. He and I are close friends. The only son of Patriot Yoon's only son(the only grandson of Yoon) is living in Seoul now and he works for Hyundai Automobile.

Yoon Bong Gil is being admired as a great Patriot in Korea.

http://www.yunbonggil.or.kr

http://www.chunghyo.net/choong

http://sca.visitseoul.net/korean/antiqu ... s02012.htm

http://book.naver.com/bookdb/book_detail.php?bid=172850

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 01 Aug 2006 10:00

Photo of the assassination attempt January 1932:
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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 01 Aug 2006 16:46

A photo of patriot Lee Bong-Chang (이봉창)

http://blog.naver.com/kf15c1.do?Redirec ... 0020871399

His last photo

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His will

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Van
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Post by Van » 02 Aug 2006 06:37

I believe I've seen a grave on Kanazawa city's Notayama cemetry with the kanji 尹 for surname and some inscribtions about a korean independance activist. Unfortunately I don't remember the latter two kanji of the name and the story written there. Could it be Yoon Bong Gil?

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Kim Sung
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Post by Kim Sung » 02 Aug 2006 06:46

Van wrote:I believe I've seen a grave on Kanazawa city's Notayama cemetry with the kanji 尹 for surname and some inscribtions about a korean independance activist. Unfortunately I don't remember the latter two kanji of the name and the story written there. Could it be Yoon Bong Gil?
Right. He was executed at a military training site of Migouyama(三小牛山), Kanazawa.

http://japanese.chosun.com/photo/specia ... 40511.html

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The homepage of a civic organization led by his nephew

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Post by Van » 02 Aug 2006 12:41

Tried to recall the inscribtion on the grave, i think it was as follows:
Yoon Bong Gil was gunshot secretly and buried without a mark near a pathway on the cemetary not far from russian soldiers of 1905 graves.
His grave was found after war with help of oral pointings of witnesses, his remnaints exhumated and sent to Korea. NOw there is a symbolic grave left with a photograph of him and a sign in japanese and korean, relating the story.
The grave is kept neet now and it is awkward that it turned out to be standing right next to a memorial complex of Great Asian War victims and victims of Manchuria and Mongolia exploration.
Here is a short note about the location, in japanese.

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 02 Aug 2006 13:01

Hirohito as Crown Prince also escaped another assassination attempt in December 1923.An anarchist Namba Daisuke fired a bird gun at his carriage as he was enroute to the Diet.The bullet shattered the glass and cut a chamberlain.

This was called the Toranomon Incident and lead to the resignation of PM Yamamoto and the national police chief.

Namba was executed in November 1924.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Namba_Daisuke

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Post by Kim Sung » 02 Aug 2006 13:19

Peter H wrote:This was called the Toranomon Incident and lead to the resignation of PM Yamamoto and the national police chief.
His father was a member of the Japanese paliament then. His father (難波作之進) resigned and refused to eat anything at home, starving to death at the end. His sister escaped to Java due to ostrazation of her family.

Toranomon Incident

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Post by Kim Sung » 02 Aug 2006 13:26

We should not forget the assassination attempt by Park Yol (박열) and his Japanese wife Kaneko Fumiko (金子文子) in 1923.

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic. ... 70&start=0

Park Yol and Kaneko Fumiko

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Peter H
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Post by Peter H » 02 Aug 2006 14:06

Yes planned but never carried out.

The Anarchists in Japan:

http://www.spunk.org/texts/places/japan ... chap1.html

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