A question of Artillery calibre

Discussions on the fortifications, artillery, & rockets used by the Axis forces.
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Radar
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Artillery

Post by Radar » 08 Jun 2004 20:03

Here are some pictures from a retractable turret in "Fort Battice" near Liege (Belgium)
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Radar
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Artillery

Post by Radar » 08 Jun 2004 20:05

There was one picture missing

Radar
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mietek
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Re: The Calibre Djungle

Post by mietek » 08 Jun 2004 20:39

varjag wrote:It also pertains to light weapons where we are back to the 1/10 of the
inch which gives for instance the .30cal and .303 of US and Britain and
Russia, though in Russia the 1/10 was called a 'Line' and resulted in
'3-line boring machines for barrels' - so the Moisin-Nagant was a 3-Line
Rifle, likewise the Nagant revolver and subsequent automatics and SMG's.


The first proposal by minister of defence P.S. Wanowski for Mosin rifle official name was "Russian 3-line rifle mark 1891", than tsar removed word "russian" so was "3-line rifle mk 1891", of course it was to long to pronounce so was caled shortly "triechliniejka" somothing like "threelined".
Finally was caled Mosin mk. 1891.
BTW. In East/Central Europe we call rifle only Mosin, not Mosin-Nagant. Russian offical name also was only Mosin.

Other caliber origins :lol:

Mortars standard caliber is still 81 mm, simply because sir Willam Stockes, who build one of the first mortairs in 1915 was also the manager of machinery company and had large stock of availabe 3,2 inch (81mm) pipes.
However Russian WW2 mortairs are 82mm - it gives possiblity to use 81mm captured ammo (was less acurate, but acceptable). Germans couldn't use russian 82mm!!!

In some cases were also political reasons. About 20? years ago were set country limits for artilery bigger than 100mm, shortly after that was designed 99 mm artilery.

Zygmunt
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Re: The Calibre Djungle

Post by Zygmunt » 08 Jun 2004 21:08

mietek wrote:In some cases were also political reasons. About 20? years ago were set country limits for artilery bigger than 100mm, shortly after that was designed 99 mm artilery.
I have some recollection that the 37mm shell came about because of an international convention (such as Geneva): It was agreed that exploding bullets with a mass of less than one pound (454g) were banned, and it the smallest shell that resulted was 37mm, so Maxims were chambered for this (and used effectively by the Boers against British forces).

Zygmunt

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