Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Discussions on the small arms used by the Axis forces.
Viktor.S
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Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by Viktor.S » 18 May 2020 14:42

Hello everyone,

I would like to learn more about how these weapons worked, but I can't read German so the original German manuals are off-limits to me. I have heard that the western Allies made some use of captured Panzerfausts in the later years of the war, so does anyone know if there are English-language manuals for these weapons available?

Thanks.

FiveStars
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by FiveStars » 19 May 2020 09:05

There are, if you are willing to pay up https://www.ebay.com/itm/German-WW2-Pan ... 2903958004.

Generally speaking, panzerfaust use during ww2 by countries other than germany had its own quirks, and was not always official. For example the Finnish and Hungarian armies had manuals on their use, while Soviet units were officially recommended by a directive. From the looks of it, they did not produce overly complicated manuals, and only had basic instructional documents such as seen here below. That being said, the Soviets utilized them generously, owing due to it's effectiveness in clearing houses and due to a lack of a better alternative in the soviet stocks.

Image

Use of captured panzerfausts by the western allies was more complicated, and usually was done on an adhoc basis without any official regulation. Usually the use of these weapons came from combat experience where allied soldiers became accustomed first hand to their effectiveness (in contrast to their own antitank weapons) and repurposed captured stocks for their own use as a supplement for their own arsenal due to a variety of factors such as availability (sometimes in lieu of their own stocks), effectiveness, and lack of a better alternative weapon.

I hope this helped clear up some confusion. Kind regards

-Max
Last edited by FiveStars on 19 May 2020 10:32, edited 1 time in total.

Viktor.S
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by Viktor.S » 19 May 2020 10:02

FiveStars wrote:
19 May 2020 09:05
-snip-
Thank you for the information, Max. I remember reading online that Finland was supplied with Panzerfaust manuals that included diagrams showing where to aim the weapon on different Soviet tanks for maximum effect, so I thought perhaps something similar might have been produced by the western Allies for their troops.

Thank you for the manual link. I was hoping there might be something freely available in public domain, given how long it's been and the obsolescence of these weapons, but I might pick that one up if nothing else shows up...

covenanter
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by covenanter » 07 Jan 2021 10:55

here is a link for an old panzerfaust and german weapons in english

https://www.oocities.org/augusta/8172/panzerfaust.htm

I hope it could help you I will check my library to see if I could find
a manual

Pierre Perrotton
Switzerland

covenanter
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by covenanter » 14 Jan 2021 21:31

here is panzerfaust info taken from

WWII "Tactical and Technical Trends" Series the US intelligence bulletin

https://www.lonesentry.com/articles/ttt ... faust.html

taken from an useful site Lone Sentry

https://www.lonesentry.com

searching for panzerfaust on the site you could find a lot of useful infos.

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Christian Ankerstjerne
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by Christian Ankerstjerne » 15 Jan 2021 23:54

Viktor.S wrote:
18 May 2020 14:42
Hello everyone,

I would like to learn more about how these weapons worked, but I can't read German so the original German manuals are off-limits to me. I have heard that the western Allies made some use of captured Panzerfausts in the later years of the war, so does anyone know if there are English-language manuals for these weapons available?

Thanks.
I translated the Panzerfaust manual I own. I hope this helps:
https://panzerworld.com/panzerfaust

Translating the rhyming mottos to maintain their meaning while still making them rhyme was a real pain, but I think I got away with it. The originals are:

Nicht nur nach vorne geht sie los,
Nach hinten gibts 'nen Feuerstoß.

Wie Du sie hältst, ist einerlei,
Die Panzerfaust schießt rückstoßfrei,
Doch merke stets: Rohrende frei!

Nicht das Schießen tut's alleine,
Auch Entfernung spricht für sich,
Willst Du Panzer treffen,
So verschätz' Dich nicht!

covenanter
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Location: switzerland

Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by covenanter » 20 Jan 2021 05:03

here are infos on the use of panzerfaust by soviet 4th Guards Tank Division in 1945.

https://awareness2367.rssing.com/chan-5 ... -live.html

G, Y?
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by G, Y? » 28 Dec 2021 02:55

There's a guy who has published how to make a working Panzerfaust launcher. For obvious reasons, he doesn't discuss how to make a warhead.

Simon Trew 1
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by Simon Trew 1 » 31 Dec 2021 11:22

Here's the stuff from my Germans-in-Normandy source guide about infantry anti-tank weapons. There are some English-language general sources, references to original German-language material and some interesting intelligence material about how the Germans used such weapons during summer 1944. Hopefully, it adds to some of the excellent recommendations made above:

1.2.1.2c. Man-portable anti-tank devices (equipment and tactics):

The Germans made widespread use of man-portable anti-tank devices during the Normandy fighting, although there appears to have been a serious lack of these weapons among coastal-defence formations and other units at the start of the campaign. Useful sources are described below.

A German doctrinal leaflet from 1944, which deals with the use of man-portable anti-tank weapons in close combat, can be found in the Bundesarchiv-Militärarchiv, reference RL 2-II/4396.

‘Die Panzerfaust: Pzf (Klein) – 30 m’ (4pp.). This German-language pamphlet provides instructions on the correct use of the ‘Panzerfaust Klein’, which had a maximum effective range of 30 metres. The booklet was issued in July 1944. A copy is accessible at https://wwii.germandocsinrussia.org/de/ ... ect/zoom/4.

‘German “Bazooka” (Faustpatrone).’ This is a translation of a captured German document that provides instructions about how to use the ‘Faustpatrone’ (also known as the Panzerfaust) in combat. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.20, issued 25 June 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/220).

‘Allotment of close-combat anti-tank weapons.’ This intelligence report reproduces information obtained from a captured German directive dated March 1944. The order laid down the scale of issue of anti-tank grenade launchers (panzerfäuste) and rocket launchers (Panzerschrecke) in formations of various types. Infantry divisions were each to receive 130 panzerschrecke (with ten rockets apiece) and 2000 panzerfäuste. See SHAEF Intelligence Notes Number 23 (17 August 1944), UK National Archives, WO 219/5234.

Berger, Hagen: Panzerknacker: Grenadiere im Nahkampf gegen Kolosse aus Stahl (Verlag für Wehrwissenschaften, no place of publication, 2013; 228pp., illustrations). This German-language book describes the characteristics of German man-portable anti-tank weapons, and their use in combat during World War II. Unfortunately, although the technical section (pp.37-50) is informative, none of the numerous case studies are from the Normandy campaign.

Fleischer, Wolfgang (trans. Force, Edward): Panzerfaust and other German Infantry Anti-tank Weapons (Schiffer Publishing Ltd., Atglen 1994; 50pp., illustrations). This is the English-language edition of the author’s Waffen Arsenal: Deutsche Panzernahbekämpfungsmittel 1917-1945 (Podzun-Pallas Verlag, Friedberg 1993). The author describes various types of anti-tank rifles, hand-carried anti-tank mines, hollow charges, grenade and rocket launchers used by the Germans during the Second World War. Many weapons of these types were employed in Normandy.

Handbook of Enemy Ammunition, Pamphlet No. 13: German Rockets, Gun and Mortar Ammunition (The War Office, London, 17 October 1944; 64pp., illustrations). This official British publication provides detailed technical descriptions of the Panzerfaust 30 (pp.25-30) and the projectile used by the Panzerschreck rocket launcher (pp.34-9). The text is illustrated by several excellent cut-away drawings.

‘Hollow Charge Anti-tank Hand Grenades.’ This Allied intelligence report describes the contents of a box of these weapons that was captured in Normandy. It is accompanied by a sketch (Appendix C). See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.57, issued 1 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/221).

Johnson, Robert; Rieger, Kurt; and Feist, Uwe: Die Wehrmacht, Volume 2 (Ryton Publications, Bellingham 2008; 192pp., illustrations). Pages 113-29 and 153-7 of this book include well-captioned photographs of man-portable anti-tank weapons of various types used by the Germans in Normandy.

‘Miscellaneous – Ordnance.’ This short report is based on information provided by a prisoner. It describes techniques used in attacking Allied tanks with hand-carried T-mines. See First U.S. Army’s G-2 Periodic Report No.31, issued 11 July 1944 (NARA II, RG 407, Box 1392, 101-2.1 FUSA G-2 periodic reports, 11 June – 1 August 1944).

‘Panzerfaust and Panzerschreck.’ This is a translation of an order issued by 363rd Infantry Division on 13 July 1944. The document draws attention to the increasing number of accidents among personnel handling these anti-tank weapons, and stresses the need for training in their correct use. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.75, issued 19 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/222).

Rottman, Gordon: Weapon 36: Panzerfaust and Panzerschreck (Osprey Publishing Ltd., Oxford 2014; 80pp., illustrations). This is a nicely illustrated technical study of man-portable AT weapons developed by the Germans during the second half of World War II. Although the author says little about their employment during summer 1944, the book contains detailed information regarding principles for their use in combat.

‘SS Handmine.’ This interrogation report provides information about a new hand-thrown anti-tank grenade that was allegedly being used by German troops in Normandy. The writer of the report observes that no examples of its use had been encountered on British Second Army’s front. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.78, issued 22 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/222).

‘Tactical signs.’ This report reproduces drawings found in a captured document. The illustrations show how the positions of panzerfauste and panzerschrecke were marked on German situation maps. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.23, issued 28 June 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/220).

‘Tank Busters.’ This intelligence report summarises the contents of ‘Der Panzerknacker’, a German tank-destruction training manual. The report notes that particular emphasis is placed by the manual on the psychological dimension of the task and the rewards that successful personnel can expect in terms of decorations and additional leave. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.70, issued 14 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/222).

‘Tank Destruction Secs.’ This intelligence report is based on information provided by a member of Engineer School Angers (see section 4.3.2.7. below). It describes how German tank-hunting teams used Tellermines to destroy enemy AFVs. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.37, issued 12 July 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/221).

‘Tank Destruction Section Kit.’ This intelligence report describes the contents of a captured ‘Pz Nahkampf Trupp Kiste Nr.1’ that was found by Canadian troops south of Caen in late July. The kit included mines, Molotov cocktails, igniters and many other devices. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.60, issued 4 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/222).

‘The “Ofenrohr” (Bazooka).’ This British intelligence report is based on the interrogation of a prisoner from 990th Grenadier Regiment’s anti-tank company (277th Infantry Division). It describes the use of the ‘Ofenrohr’ (another name for the Panzerschreck) in combat. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.41, issued 16 July 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/221).

‘The “Panzerschreck” (“Ofenrohr”).’ This report describes the tactical employment of Panzerschreck sections, as described by a member of 959th Grenadier Regiment’s anti-tank company (363rd Infantry Division) captured in Normandy in August 1944. See Part II of British Second Army’s Intelligence Summary No.78, issued 22 August 1944 (UK National Archives, WO 171/222).

Zaloga, Steven: Panzerfaust vs Sherman: European Theater 1944-45 (Osprey Publishing Ltd., Oxford 2019; 80pp., maps, illustrations). This book describes the use of German man-portable anti-tank grenade and rocket launchers in north-west Europe during 1944-5. Technical specifications and methods of use are covered, along with U.S. counter-measures. A case study of how this type of weapon was used in combat in Normandy is included on pp.64-70.

‘8.8 cm anti-tank rocket launcher 54 Panzerschreck.’ This report is based on a captured document. It describes how on Hitler’s orders, the official title of this weapon (R. Pz.B.54) was to be replaced with the term ‘Panzerschreck’ (meaning ‘tank terror’). It also describes modifications to the launcher’s design. See Annex 2 to First U.S. Army’s G-2 Periodic Report No.4, issued 14 June 1944 (NARA II, RG 407, Box 1392, 101-2.1 FUSA G-2 periodic reports, 11 June – 1 August 1944).

G, Y?
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Re: Panzerfaust manuals in English (?)

Post by G, Y? » 01 Jan 2022 04:13

Here's a link to the book on the launcher. He doesn't discuss the warhead.

https://www.amazon.com/Expedient-Recoil ... 443&sr=8-1

In this thread, he discusses making the fliegerfaust (personal AA weapon):

https://www.ar15.com/forums/General/Man ... 5-2452924/

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