Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

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Komi
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Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by Komi » 28 Jan 2021 21:38

Aside from the Japanese Type 99, were there any other light-machineguns around during the interwar or WWII era that were equipped with telescopic sights? If so, I'd like to learn any details about the sights themselves, such as magnification, field of view, number of these sights produced, how they were issued, so on.

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Poot
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Re: Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by Poot » 29 Jan 2021 00:42

This is a fairly well known Bundesarchiv photo of a German soldier in the east shouldering a scoped MG-34. It appears to be a Soviet scope if I recall correctly, and was likely a 'one-off' configuration. Being mounted on the receiver cover as it was, I'd be concerned about repeatability of zero.

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Komi
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Re: Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by Komi » 29 Jan 2021 10:36

Poot wrote:
29 Jan 2021 00:42
Interesting, thank you for sharing that.

One-off field modifications are definitely not outside the scope (no pun intended) of my question here, so if anyone knows of other examples of this sort of thing happening, please feel free to post.

andrewwillson
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Re: Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by andrewwillson » 20 Apr 2021 13:38

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LineDoggie
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Re: Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by LineDoggie » 20 Apr 2021 17:21

Poot wrote:
29 Jan 2021 00:42
This is a fairly well known Bundesarchiv photo of a German soldier in the east shouldering a scoped MG-34. It appears to be a Soviet scope if I recall correctly, and was likely a 'one-off' configuration. Being mounted on the receiver cover as it was, I'd be concerned about repeatability of zero.

Pat

cbc4c02f7661ce1e2d86e02f205031c9.jpg
Is the MG34 top cover stamped or machined? does the top cover fit sloppily or tight

those will affect its ability to hold zero

as an example today optical sights are mounted on the top covers of the M249 SAW and the M240
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jbaum
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Re: Telescopic sights on light-machineguns

Post by jbaum » 16 May 2021 02:25

For the Germans, a "light" machinegun is not mounted on a lafette, it is hand carried, and may be shot while moving. Mounting the MG34 or MG42 on a lafette converted it to a "heavy" MG, so that leaves the FG42 and MP43 series as being the only light MGs that commonly had a telescopic sight.

Most of the MG34s and all of the MG42s had top covers that were stamped. While the fitting could be snug, they weren't held immovable. They both used the same telescopic sights (the MG34 and the MGz) which were mounted on the lafette (ground mount), not on the gun itself. MG34 and MGz scope magnification was 3x, field of view was about 240m at 1,000m distance. The reticle was an inverted V shape. The MG34 and MGz scopes were very similar in specs, but the MGz was redesigned to allow the head of the shooter to be lower to prevent incoming hits. There was also a small periscope that could be retrofitted on the MG34 scope to perform the same function.
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