Storm Troopers of WWI

Discussions on all aspects of Imperial Germany not covered in the other sections.
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T.R.Searle
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Storm Troopers of WWI

Post by T.R.Searle » 30 Jun 2002 22:26

Does anyone have any information about the German Storm Troopers of WWI? like pictures,information about there uniforms,weapons,battles etc...

T.R.Searle :)

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Phil V
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Post by Phil V » 09 Jul 2002 12:43

Unlike the Stormtroopers (Sturmabteilung) of the twenties and thirties the Stormtroopers of WW1 (Strosstrupps) were considered to be an elite fighting force. They started out in 1916 at Verdun as a detatchment within the normal regiment that specialised in assaulting the enemy (hence the name Strosstrupps). They were highly successful at Verdun and the German High Command formed a Sturmcompanie for each of it's Regiments. Further successes saw the developing of the Sturmcompanie into a Sturmbattalione. At the end of the war in 1918 the Sturmbattalione consisted of four assault companies, a gun battery, motar detatchment and machine gun company.

The Strosstrupps are regarded as the intitial "special forces" units of modern warfare.

I have some extracts from "German Stormtrooper 1914-18" by Ian Drury. It is very informative re. this topic. Good pictures too.

There is also an old book (published 1920) by WW1 Storm Trooper Ernst Jünger called "Storm of Steel: From the Diary of a German Storm-Troop Officer on the Western Front". I have read extracts from this and it is fascinating.

Both of these books contain any info. desired on this subject.

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USAF1986
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Post by USAF1986 » 10 Jul 2002 03:13

You are right, "The Storm of Steel" is excellent...one of my absolute favorite personal accounts of any war. An outstanding book on the evolution of WWI German storm troop tactics and the development and employment of Germany's first tanks is "The German A7V Tank and the Captured British Mark IV Tanks of World War I" by Maxwell Hundleby & Rainer Strasheim. This book is a highly detailed accounting of all German WWI tank actions replete with battle maps showing the advances (and knock out points) of individual German tanks in many cases! The book is PACKED with photos, line drawings, color schemes, all distinctive features of the A7Vs described (tank names, number of tow shackles[!], chassis numbers, etc., etc.) as well as the captured British "booty" tanks. Outstanding book...highly recommended!

Regards,
Shawn

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T.R.Searle
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Post by T.R.Searle » 10 Jul 2002 12:35

Thanx both of you :D

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RCR_Raider
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Post by RCR_Raider » 05 Aug 2002 17:36

During World War 1, Canadian troops were under British command.

Canadians were used as the Stormtroopers of the Empire. The attack troops.Australian corps were also used in such a manner.

Any movement of Canadian regiments meant imminant attack for the Germans.

Maybe this was because the British didnt want to sacrifice their own men, and that "lesser colonials" would be a less valuable sacrifice.

Mike R
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Post by Mike R » 06 Aug 2002 03:36

THis past weekend I was helping an uncle clean out his apartment and I came across a lot of ww1 items that belonged to my great-grandfather who served in the 94th Aero. One of these is a book, "Collier's Photographic History of the European War", that was published in 1916. The photographs are truly unbelievable. These photographs are nothing at all like the pictures you find today from ww1. There are amazing pictures of infantry charges and naval actions, as they were happening. This book has something like 200+ pictures. If the extremely worn condition of this book permits, I will try to scan some. Email me if you would like some for now (rogersmb@notes.udayton.edu) I will try to post a few later. In addition to this book there is also a small photo album that contains many un-published pictures taken by my great-grandfather as the Americans advanced(as well as a few of Rickenbacker). Lots of pictures of battlefields only a few hours old....truly remarkable and sobering.

-Mike

Gwynn Compton
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Post by Gwynn Compton » 06 Aug 2002 08:08

Canadians were used as the Stormtroopers of the Empire. The attack troops.Australian corps were also used in such a manner.


Stormtroopers of the Empire or cannon fodder? The Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders were all very formidiable fighting formations in both wars, but always in World War I, my impression has been that they were used more as cannon fodder than applied in a "stormtrooper" fashion...

Regards

Gwynn

Durand
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Post by Durand » 30 Aug 2002 01:08

If you are still looking for information on die Stosstruppen, you might also try the following books:

Copse 125 by Ernst Jünger (a sequel to Storm of Steel)

and

Stormtroop Tactics: Innovation in the Germany Army, 1914-1918 by Bruce I. Gudmundsson.

J.D.

Gwynn Compton
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Post by Gwynn Compton » 30 Aug 2002 01:21

John Keegan's The First World War also contains an interesting discussion about the development and use of Stormtroopers.

The Stormtroopers provided very useful in German Operations from 21st March till 17th July in 1918, however, the German armies simply no longer had the manpower to carry on at this stage in the war. Had the Stormtroopers been developed earlier in the war, the Germans could have had a shot at winning, but by 1918, all was already lost, especially when the exhausted German divisions ran into the American Divisions, which were roughly twice the size of their German counterparts.

One way in which to view the Stormtroopers, is that they were the German's equivilent of the tank, a new weapon developed to try and break the gridlock of the Western Front. Germany, due to the allied blockade, did not have the resources avaliable to persue a tank program like the British, and thus logic dictaited that they find a tactical way around the trench warfare problem, to which the Stormtroopers were a fairly effective answer.

Gwynn

Anthony EJW
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Post by Anthony EJW » 01 Sep 2002 18:14

Gwynn Compton wrote:
Canadians were used as the Stormtroopers of the Empire. The attack troops.Australian corps were also used in such a manner.


Stormtroopers of the Empire or cannon fodder? The Canadians, Australians and New Zealanders were all very formidiable fighting formations in both wars, but always in World War I, my impression has been that they were used more as cannon fodder than applied in a "stormtrooper" fashion...

Regards

Gwynn


Of the divisions in the BEF in France 1917, 21 had over a 100% casualty rate. 16 of these were UK manned, while 5 were dominion manned.

Paddy Griffith notes that the BEF's platoon training manual SS 143 of February 1917 is, in essence, a stormtrooper's handbook. It includes instructions for a miniture all-arms battle in which every section played a distinct part. This was applied to the whole BEF rather than just a proportion of it and was infact routinely applied in practice from 1917 onwards.

Krag
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Post by Krag » 27 Dec 2002 21:53

I am trying to locate some photos of WW1 German Storm Troopers for an article I am preparing. Can anyone suggest a source (website, book, etc.) where I might find some I could get permission to use?

Many thanks.

Geheime Feldpolizei
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"Special Leave" Reward for Capturing German Stormt

Post by Geheime Feldpolizei » 04 Feb 2003 12:35

I was recently reading a post-WW I German book dealing with WW I soldiers. In the book, there was a description of an attempt by several British soldiers to capture an Unteroffizier of a storm troop unit. The author went on to say that the British soldiers were very keen to capture the German since capturing a member of the German stormtroops would translate into tangible rewards such as special home leave, etc. Does anyone have information that would confirm this assertion? If so, I would appreciate hearing from you! Source information would be particularly appreciated.

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Greg K.
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site

Post by Greg K. » 04 Feb 2003 18:32

this is a site that i've gone to to look things up now and then, take a look and see if this helps..


http://www.austro-hungarian-army.co.uk/ ... uppen.html

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Dennis Redler
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Storm Troopers of WW1

Post by Dennis Redler » 05 Feb 2003 12:22

Here's a book I like because of the photos and color plates. It's frem the Osprey Men At Arms Series called German Army 1914-18 by D.S.V.Fosten andR.J.Marrion, color plates by G.A.Embleton.
Here's the cover and a photo from the book.
Dennis Redler :)
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Greg K.
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Post by Greg K. » 06 Feb 2003 00:33

if you haven't read the great book called "EYE-DEEP IN HELL" Trench Warfare in World War I, By john ellis

you must, has super photos thru out and great read...


also check out this site, it has a photos of and information on "The Storm Of Steel"

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/FWWjunger.htm

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