Your Favorite Surface Raider of WWI??

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David C. Clarke
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Your Favorite Surface Raider of WWI??

Post by David C. Clarke » 03 Feb 2004 03:41

I'm torn between Wolf and Mowe, but there's always Emden. What do you think?

Cheers, David

alf
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Post by alf » 03 Feb 2004 06:04

I have always favoured the Emden and not because she was hunted down and destroyed by an Australian Cruiser HMAS Sydney but because she fought a lonely campagian so far from home with great daring and always with chivalry and honour

http://www.lib.byu.edu/~rdh/wwi/1914/emden.html has both a German and Australlian report on her destruction. The chivlary on both sides, seems quaint these days I guess, a reminder of a forgone era.

Returning to the Emden, she still had her colors up at mainmast head. I inquired by signal, international code, "Will you surrender?" and received a reply in Morse "What signal?" "No signal books." then made in Morse, "Do you surrender?" and subsequently, "Have you received my signal?" to neither of which did I get an answer. The German officers on board gave me to understand that the captain would never surrender, and therefore, though very reluctantly, I again fired at her at 4.30 p.m., ceasing at 4.35 p.m., as she showed white flags and hauled down her ensign by sending a man aloft....

I lay on and off all night and communicated with Direction Island at 8 a.m., November 10, to find that the Emden's party, which had landed on Keeling Island, consisting of 3 officers and 40 men, 1 launch and 2 cutters, had seized and provisioned a 70-ton schooner, the Ayesha, having 4 Maxims with 2 belts to each. They left the previous night at six o'clock. The wireless station was entirely destroyed, 1 cable cut, 1 damaged, and 1 intact. I borrowed a doctor and two assistants and proceeded as fast as possible to the Emden's assistance.

I sent an officer on board to see the captain, and in view of the large number of prisoners and wounded and lack of accommodation, etc., in his ship, and the absolute impossibility of leaving them where they were, he agreed that if I would receive his officers and men and all wounded, then as for such time as they remained in the Sydney they would cause no interference with ship or fittings, and would be amenable to the ship's discipline. I, therefore, set to work at once to tranship them -- a most difficult operation, the ship being on the weather side of the island and the sand alongside very heavy. The condition in the Emden was indescribable. I received the last word from her at 5 p.m., then had to go round to the lee side to pickup 30 more men who had managed to get ashore from the ship....





http://www.booksmags.com/books/search/res/r345717.html

Plus the sheer audicity of some of the crews attempt to escape

What followed was a six-month voyage that took the Emden and its crew halfway around the world, fighting heroic battles both on land and at sea, culminating in a dramatic journey across the Arabian desert, which saw the crew survive attacks of malaria, typhus, dysentery, and the murderous onslaught of Lawrence of Arabia's bedouin tribesmen

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John W
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Post by John W » 03 Feb 2004 07:24

Thank you alf, for priving a nice link to a ship that has become not only a legend but a part of history and folklore (and language!) to my people :)

Gwynn Compton
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Post by Gwynn Compton » 03 Feb 2004 22:42

I'd go for the Emden as well.

Gwynn

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Post by Abdul Hadi Pasha » 04 Feb 2004 01:38

I don't see how there can be any doubt that it is Emden.

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Post by Gwynn Compton » 04 Feb 2004 01:46

I believe the Commissar is going to have to explain why he is not in favour of the Emden :P

Gwynn

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adrian
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Post by adrian » 04 Feb 2004 01:59

Emden.

The daring, the chivalry,the glorious defeat even. Its just such a great story. And no political or nasty overtones!

adrian

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 04 Feb 2004 14:32

Oh gee, guys, you know I'd never say anything bad about "The Swan of the East"!! Emden bagged fifteen merchant ship and 2 warships in about three month's time.
But little Mowe, operated for nearly 2 years and sank 38 merchant ships. Wolf undertook the longest cruise of any raider and even used a seaplane for scouting. While Emden had a spectacular, but brief career, Moweand Wolf kept the pot bubbling and must have driven the English Navy into spasms trying to figure out how to bring them to heel.
But, it's all a matter of opinion and probably revolves around the question of which was better for Commerce Raiding, converted merchantmen or warships?

Best Regards, David

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Prit
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Post by Prit » 04 Feb 2004 15:14

It has to be the Emden.

Nice looking ship, immortal career.

Prit

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 04 Feb 2004 17:12

Well, I have to say that I believe a lot of the attraction Emden has for our British contributors was her eventual destruction at the hands of HMAS Sydney.

Mowe, on the other hand, was never caught and didn't have to go out in a blaze of glory in an unequal battle with a superior force. So, I tend to favor Mowe.

Best Regards,
~D

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 04 Feb 2004 17:56

Oh yes, basic information on Mowe:


Launched: 9 May, 1914
Commissioned:1 November, 1915 (as H D 10)
Crew: 16 Officers and 219 men

Registered Tonnage: 4,788 (grt.)
Overall Length: 124.5 meters
Waterline Length: 117.8 meters
Beam: 14.4 meters
Speed: 14 knots
Range: 8,700 nautical miles at 12 knots

Armament:
four 15cm SK L/45
one 10.5cm SK C/88 L/40
two torpedo tubes
600 15cm shells, 200 10.5cm shells, 500 mines and 12 50cm C/08 torpedoes

Merchantmen sunk:
38 (165,340 grt + 1 of unknown displacement)
Cruises-5
First Cruise: December 1915–March 1916
Last Oceanic Cruise: 22 November 1916–March 22, 1917

Incidently, it should be noted that one of the ships sunk by her mines was the British Battleship H.M.S. King Edward VII. She survived the war, serving first as a British merchantman and then as a German merchantman, only to be sunk by Allied air attack on April 7, 1945 in the Second World War!!!
(Information from The Kaiser's Pirates by John Walter, N.I.P., 1994 pages 140-154)

Best Regards, David

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 04 Feb 2004 18:21

And, by way of comparison, basic information on S.M.S. Emden:


Launched: 26 May, 1906
Commissioned:10 July, 1909
Crew: 18 Officers and 343 men

Full-Load Displacement: 4,268 Tonnes
Overall Length: 118.3 meters
Waterline Length: 117.9 meters
Beam: 13.5 meters
Speed (Service Maximum): 23.5 knots
Range: 3,600 nautical miles at 12 knots

Armament:
ten 10.5cm SK C/88 L/40
eight 5.2 SK L/55
one Short-barreled 6 cm landing gun
four 8mm Maxim machine guns
two torpedo tubes
1,500 10.5cm shells, five 45cm C/03 torpedoes
Armor:
Deck–20-30mm
Conning Tower–100mm
Gun Shields–50mm

Ships sunk:
15 merchantmen and 2 warships (66,023 grt + 3,491 L td.)
Cruises-1
4 August 1914–9 November 1914

(Same Source)


Best Regards, David

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dead-cat
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Post by dead-cat » 04 Feb 2004 18:29

the Emden had a triple expansion engine and not a turbine, right?

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David C. Clarke
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Post by David C. Clarke » 04 Feb 2004 19:00

Yes D-C, two three-cylinder triple expansion steam engines, supplied by twelve boilers. Two propeller shafts (unlike Dresden, which had four shafts).

Best Regards, David

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Snoopy
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Post by Snoopy » 05 Feb 2004 16:30

My favorite:

The SEEADLER (Sea Eagle) under command of Lt.Cmdr. Felix Graf von Luckner.

The former Pass of Balmaha had a short but distinguished career and Lt.Cmdr.v.Luckner was credited with capturing 16 ships without the loss of a single allied sailor.

just my 2 cents worth -

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