Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Discussions on all aspects of the German Colonies and Overseas Expeditions. Hosted by Chris Dale.
User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 507
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Tanzania » 25 Jun 2016 11:07

.

By the way: The S.M.S. GOETZEN as live-performance, in a theatre play!?!?!


“ . . . . . through touch, body-language, mimic interaction and spontaneous
emotional release, these traumata can be worked through and dissolved
. . . . .”


My resyme: >> Die haben doch wirklich einen an der Waffel <<


Image

Source: http://www.noz.de/lokales/papenburg/art ... -papenburg

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 507
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Tanzania » 29 Jun 2016 13:38

.

THE S.M.S. GOETZEN AND THE T.S.S. CECIL RHODES AS OPPONENTS ON LAKE TANGANYIKA? (Part V)




THE BRITISH T.S.S. (Tanganyika Steam Ship) CECIL RHODES (Part IV)

Below you find the exact location from where the `Goetzen´ supposed to towed the `Cecil Rhodes´ into deep water
in June / July 1915 and where remaining parts of the steam engine was found in the fishing village of Kasakalawe.

GPS Position: 08°47´11.1´´S – 31°04´45.8´´E



Image


Image


Image





During several days more than two dozen `local experts´ in the near surroundings have been asked about details
of the history, locations and other further informations of this Steamer, which also included people who deal with
diving in this part of Lake Tanganyika. All statements are nearly the same and sobering: They be aware definitely
about a wreckage of the First World War in Kasakalawe. The wreckage is located (`exactly´!) 10 meter, 30 meter,
100 meter away from the beach and in a depth of 9 meter, 20 meter, 38 meter, but nobody saw it with own eyes.

When the Great War started 1914 also in Africa, the `Cecil Rhodes´ laid abounded on the beach at Kasakalawe.
However the steam engine and other parts were removed in 1903 out of the hull. Even though parts of the steam
engine were found on the beach it´s therefore also feasible that the hull or parts of it are on the lake bottom, and
therefore it could be possible the `Goetzen´ pulled off the `Cecil Rhodes´ on the beach and towed into deep water.

The statement of Captain Zimmer, the German Naval Commander on Lake Tanganyika, leave the impression that
the new, in June 1915 commissioned `Goetzen´ was underpowered, because of the used firewood: “Engines too
weak to make headway against a strong wind, during the heavy storms and seas frequent on Lake Tanganyika.

Due to this it sounds a little strange that the `Goetzen´ would still be able to pull another steamer with a few tons
from the countryside. Nerveless it must take also into account that both Steamers have had significant differences
in the size and a feed rail was constructed before the `Goetzen´ towed the `Cecil Rhodes into deep water and sunk.

Below is shown a grossly size comparison of both Steamers which alleged situated west of Kasakalawe outpost.
S.M.S. GOETZEN . . . = 71,40 m with gross: 800 tons
T.S.S. CECIL RHODES = 22.55 m with gross: 60 tons

Image





The Director of the `Moto Moto Museum´ Mrs. Victoria Chitungu, in the nearby District-city Mbala (former Abercorn)
is a very cooperate and committed Lady who is also interested to add additional objects in their area of responsibility.
After transfer of the new aviable information and datas to her, she was also very interested to get further Informations
and planned to ask at the higher office in Lusaka during her next stay. She planned to search in the National Archives
of Zambia for background informations of this this wreckage near Kasakalawe and if this could be the `Cecil Rhodes´.

http://www.zambianmuseums.org . . http://www.museumszambia.org/#sthash.G5szocsE.dpbs . . http://www.nationalarchiveszambia.org/

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 507
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Tanzania » 13 Jul 2016 04:11

.

THE S.M.S. GOETZEN AND THE T.S.S. CECIL RHODES AS OPPONENTS ON LAKE TANGANYIKA? (Part VI)




THE BRITISH T.S.S. (Tanganyika Steam Ship) CECIL RHODES (Part V)

A.T.T.C. = African Transcontinental Telegraph Company
T.C.L. . . = Tanganyika Concessions, Limited
B.S.A.C. = British South African Company
A.L.C. . . = African Lakes Corporation
T.S.S. . . = Tanganyika Steam Ship




The flags under which the `Goetzen´ (1915) and `Cecil Rhodes´ (1901) were running during their first service period.

Image . . . Image

(The right Flag was designed by Robert Williams self and pictured the ensign of the Belgian-British mining company
`Union Miniere du Haut Katanga´ in Congo. For certain that the Union Jack have been also waived on the steamer.)

Sources: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... 18.svg.png . . . http://www.africafederation.net/Republic_Katanga.gif




The results of the data analysis which are currently known about the `Cecil Rhodes´ can be summarised briefly
as follows: The Steamer `Cecil Rhodes´ was ordered in 1897 to the small British Shipyard Forrestt & Son Ltd.
at Wvenhoe Essex at the River Colne. Forrestt’s company was specialized to: “bolt a vessel together but then
dismantle her and send it, in small parcels, to her destination where it would be reassembled and riveted up.

The `Cecil Rhodes´ was also designed and constructed as such a “do-it-yourself kit”, (likewise the `Goetzen´ 15
years later in Germany) and completed in 1898. Subsequently she was assembled and on 18. November 1899
presented to the public, christened and for the first time launched on River Colne. It can be also expected that
probable even in the presence of the eponym, Cecil J. Rhodes self who was at this time in the United Kingdom.

The steamer was now again disassembled and packed in one-man-load boxes. Shipped by a freighter through
the Suez Channel and followed the, at this time classical getaway into the South-Eastern part of Central-Africa,
Chinde, on the river mouth of the Zambezi. Paddle Steamer took over the further transportation North-Western
up to the Murchison Cataracts of the Shire River to Lake Nyasa. Up until that time some British steamers were
already running on Lake Nyasa by A.L.C. and shipped the `Cecil Rhodes´ pieces to the North end of this Lake,
Karonga. This B.S.A.C. founded station was also the start point of for the Stevenson Road to Lake Tanganyika.

Customer of this small steamer was the T.C.L. which had been founded 1899 by Robert Williams (1860 - 1938)
He got the concession of B.S.A.C. with condition to build a Steamer and put into service on Lake Tanganyika.
Under the leadership of the B.S.A.C. agent, explorer and adventurer, Mr. Michael James Holland (1870 - 1956)
the parts of the `Cecil Rhodes´ were transported from Karonga northwest on the Stephenson Road, assembled
and successful launched on Lake Tanganyika at 26. October 1901 but commenced running the first time four
weeks later, end of November 1901; almost two years after the first launch on River Colne in the United Kingdom.

Online sources:
The African Lakes Corporation Limited: http://www.wikiwand.com/en/African_Lakes
Scramble for Katanga: http://www.africafederation.net/SCRAMBLE_KATANGA.htm
Michael James Holland: http://www.jjhc.info/hollandmichaeljames1956.htm
Sir Robert Williams: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Rober ... t,_of_Park
Correspondence of Cecil John Rhodes: http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/ ... s-cj1.html
African Transcontinental Telegraph Company: http://www.ub.bildarchiv-dkg.uni-frankf ... ph_Company




The following map showed Cecil J. Rhodes whole project of `The Cape to Cairo Telegraph´ line in which this the
`Cecil Rhodes´ should be undertake the service for the transportation of telegraph material along Lake Tanganyika.

Image

Original Source: https://www.jstor.org/stable/29545698?s ... b_contents
“The Telegraph in British Central Africa“, The Nyasaland Journal, Vol. 6, No. 2, July 1953, pp. 52-55, By Twynam.




Image

Original Source: https://ia800501.us.archive.org/5/items ... 19newy.pdf
“The Engineering Magazine”, An International review, Volume XIX, April to September 1900, J. Dunlap. Chapter I. page 17




Due to the remaining parts of the `Cecil Rhodes´ on the beach at Kasakalawe it can be accepted as established,
that this location have been also the same place where the `Hedwig v. Wissmann´ & `Kingani´ try to destroy the
`Cecil Rhodes´ on 19th November 1914 and furthermore the `Goetzen´ repeated this again on the 4th July 1915.
To complete the story about this harmless opponent of the `Goetzen´ on Lake Tanganyika during the Great War
we come now to the point and the location at Lake Tanganyika where the `Cecil Rhodes´ have been assembled
and launched for the second time. I must admit that I haven´t found any place-name in the current aviable sources.
Even Authors who published special works about Steamers and Vessels on all Great Lakes in East / Central Africa
refer only few or even no indications. L.G. Bill Dennis mentioned in his Book oddly enough this Steamer not at all.
and David Reynolds carried also only two subordinate clauses within his statement about the S. S. `Good News´:
“In 1914 the Germans, who had heard that the British were preparing vessels to combat the German flotilla on the
lake, sent an expedition south to Kasakalawe Bay, where they sought the Cecil Rhodes, an old British steamer
placed on the lake by the chartered company. It lay on a beach without engines and was blown to pieces. For
good measure they `destroyed´ the Good News, which was likewise stranded and `blasted its rusty Hull to scrap´.”
Both Authors listed from Lake Nyassa, Lake Tanganyika, Lake Kivu, Lake Albert, Lake Kyoga and Lake Victoria
and also the Nile all Vessels, from smallest steam Tug to the biggest Motor ship after 1945 and described every
complete life cycle several pages long. Even the descriptions from really unknown German sailing ships on Lake
Victoria
and Lake Nyassa are pictured. So, why are this gap with the `Cecil Rhodes´ and not any description about
this biggest British Steamer on Lake Tanganyika before the Great War? What could be the reason for the absence
of reports and further informations? There is a growing perception that this Steamer never operated on this Lake!?
One of the reasons that this steamer probable never got in real service on Lake Tanganyika could be the fact, that
the `Cecil Rhodes´ was running only at the end of November 1901 and the initiator of the whole plan, Cecil Rhodes
self past away already 4 months later on 26. March 1902. After his dead the further works of the A.T.T.C. in German
East Africa
moving forward only at a very slow pace and have been 1903 finally discontinued after the arrival in Ujiji.
Because of the financial problems of the A.T.T.C. there was also no further resources aviable for a costly, additional
steamer at the British part on Lake Tanganyika. Rhodes Cape to Cairo Railway plan collapsed also shortly thereafter.

Further Sources:
“Afrikanische Binnenschiffahrt”, Arthur Dix, (1908), Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics, Band. 64, pp. 108 -124.
“Steam and Quinine on African Great Lakes, bygone Ships, Trains and Planes”, David Reynolds, Pretoria, South Africa, 1997.
“The Lake Steamers of East Africa”. A history of the vessels of the East African lakes, L.G. Dennis, Runnymede Malthouse 1996.
“The British Annexation of Northern Zambezia (1884 - 1924) Anatomy of a Conquest”, F. MacPherson, Edinburg University, 1976.
“The Robert Williams Company in Lubemba, 1901-1911”, T. R. M. Mvusi, Trans African Journal of History, Vol. 23 (1994) pp. 43-68.
“Robert Williams, 1860-1938. A Personal Appreciation” R. Wingate, Journal of the African Society, Vol. 37, No. (1938), pp. 339-343.
“From Cape to Cairo. The First Traverse of Africa from South to North”, E.S.Grogan & A.H.Sharp, London, Hurst and Blackett, 1900.
“The Story of Rhodesia, Told in a series of Historical Pictures”, (And B.S.A.C), The Empire Exhibition Johannesburg 1936-1937.
“The Great Plateau of Northern Rhodesia, Being some impressions of the Tanganyika Plateau”, Cullen Gouldsbury, London 1911.
“A Handbook of Nyasaland”, S.S. Murray, Nyasaland Government, 1922. The Government Printer, Zomba, Nyasaland Protectorate.
“Cecil Rhodes, The man and his works”, by his private and confidential secretaries, Gordon Le Sueur, John Murray, London 1913.
“Further Correspondence respective the Independent State of Congo, Africa No.1” (1908) presented to His Majesty’s Government.


.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 507
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Tanzania » 11 Sep 2016 18:45

.

Before we continue with the investigation of the S.M.S. `Goetzen´ and the T.S.S. `Cecil Rhodes´ occasionally a question.



The photo on the right is known, but the left additions photo is mysteriously for me. Seems to be both are cut from the rest?

Any idea which uniform the most left soldier use?


The title mentioned only:
Kigoma, 6 octobre 1915, Adroite, le lieutenant de Vaisseau Brocks, officier de tir du “Graf von Götzen” (Collection Cuvelier)

Image

Source: Mémoires du Congo, et du Ruanda-Urundi, n°34 – Juin 2015, La guerre au Congo belge (3) page 10
http://memoiresducongo.be/wp-content/up ... MDC-34.pdf

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Tanzania
Member
Posts: 507
Joined: 04 Jun 2009 13:59
Location: Germany

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Tanzania » 16 Sep 2016 18:34

.
The photo on the right is known, but the left additions photo is mysteriously for me. Seems to be both are cut from the rest?
Any idea which uniform the most left soldier use?

I think I have to explain my question. Because of the different looking badges, respective `Coat of arms´ on
the peaked caps, I expected at first the left person shows a captured Belgian officer. But now I am be aware
that the Imperial German Navy used these badges with cockade for navy officers in different designs and sizes.


Image


But it would be still interesting to know who this German Navy officer was?
.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

User avatar
Chris Dale
Host - German Colonies
Posts: 1918
Joined: 21 Apr 2004 14:48
Location: UK

Re: Hope yet for the Graf Götzen on Lake Tanganyika

Post by Chris Dale » 27 Nov 2016 23:40

More great work, Holger...

Cheers
Chris

Return to “German Colonies and Overseas Expeditions”