German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

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German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 23 Jan 2016 06:36

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SURVIVORS OF THE GERMAN VESSEL HEDWIG VON WISSMANN AFTER NAVAL BATTLE ON LAKE TANGANYIKA ON 9. FEFRUARY 1916




" Prisoners from the German steamboat 'Hedwig von Wissmann' guarded by a British serviceman. German East Africa, February 1916."

Image

Source: Imperial War Museum: http://wwiafrica.ghost.io/prisoners-of-war/

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“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Chris Dale » 03 Feb 2016 11:11

Thanks very much for sharing that photo!

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 13 Feb 2016 18:59

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THE ATTEMPT TO IDENTIFY THE FOUR GERMAN SAILORS ON THE PHOTO




Image

(In my opinion the “The British serviceman” looks more like a Belgian officer.)




THE WHOLE CREW OF THE HEDWIG VON WISSMANN

The crew members of the German vessel Hedwig v. Wissmann comprised on their last
mission on 9th February 1916 of 28 men; 14 European-, and 14 Local German seamen.

Source: The Operations in East-Africa, World War 1914-1918, Ludwig Boell, page 133.




THE FOURTEEN EUREOPEAN GERMAN SAILORS

1. Leutnant zur See, Job Wilhelm Odebrecht (Captain on Hedwig v. Wissmann, formerly Adjutant on S.M.S. Möve)
was captured on 9.2.1916. Source: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_Odebrecht

2. Bootsmannsmaat / Boatswain`s mate, Hugo Hein , (from Marggrabowa / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

3. Ingenieurs-Maat / Eng.- Mate, Otto Mewes, (from Rosenthal /Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

4. Maat / Mate, Peter Schmitz, (from Dülken i. Rheinl./Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

5. Quartiermeister / Quartermaster, Hans Lengemann, (from Carrssen i. Hann./ Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

6. Seemann / Sailor, Paul Muntzinger, (from Metz / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

7. Seemann / Sailor, Otto Möhring, (from Drakenstedt / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

8. Seemann / Sailor, Dietrich Thirling, (from Waddens / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

9. Seemann / Sailor, Paul Reichert, (from Köpenick / Berlin / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

10. Seemann / Sailor, Emil Würger, (from Karlshöhe / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

11. Heizer / Heater, Emil Köster, (from Wülfringhausen / Germany) was captured on 9.2.1916

12. Heizer / Heater, Paul Käsemann, (from Oberdorla i. Thüring./ Germany) ) was captured on 9.2.1916

Source: Deutsches Kolonialblatt, Issued 1916, Fifth list of causalities of the Imperial `Schutztruppe´ for GEA, page 233.



13. Oberheizer / Upper-heater, Carl Gettmann, († fell during the fight on 9.2.1916 on Hedwig v. Wissmann)

14. Vermessungssteuermann / Surveying-helmsman, Paul Hölzer, († fell during the fight on 9.2.1916 on Hedwig v. Wissmann)
(Deckoffizier / Warrant officer on S.M.S. Möve, Source: http://www.traditionsverband.de/magazin/moewe.html )

Original source: Namensliste der gefallenen Kolonialhelden des 1. Weltkrieges von Dr. Justus Schottelius.
This source is now also online visible as a list:
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/2014/brem ... frika.html




THE FOURTEEN LOCAL GERMAN SAILORS

Unfortunately no real official German lists or documents with names of the German Askaris surveyed the War.
During the fight on the 9th February, one local sailors fell, four are drowned and nine survivors were taken prisoners.

Only one sentence mentioned later the names of two of the local machine personnel:
“. . . Samilani and Sultani Ihaja have very much proved during the accident (?), but sunk with the H.v.W. at beginning of 1916.”

Source: Personal records (3 handwritten pages) of Kapitänleutnant a. D. Oskar Kendrick († fell on 9.10.1916) as part
of the unpublished raw manuscript of Ludwig Boell for the book: The Operations in East-Africa, World War 1914-1918





The first photo of the Hedwig v. Wissmann on 20th September 1900 at about 06:30 a.m.at Kassanga (Wissmanhafen / Bismarckburg)

Image




. . . and fifteen years later, one of the last photos of the Hedwig v. Wissmann in the harbour of Kigoma.

Image




Finally a Modell of the Hedwig v. Wissmann:
http://www.modellbau-club-mainspitze.de ... /index.php

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 22 Feb 2016 11:44

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IDENTIFICATION OF THE CREW OF THE GERMAN VESSEL `KINGANI´




Six weeks before the Hedwig v. Wissmann sank, the German have had lost the Kingani on 26. December 1915.


SOME SOURCES
“ As the British launches moved to cut the Kingani off from retreating, things became interesting. According to
Farwell, Leutnant zur See d. R. Junge shouted when he saw the British boats, "Die Englander sind hier!" and
swung to port. At this moment accounts diverge. According to Farwell, the Kingani’ s armament consisted of a
6pdr mounted on the fore-deck that was heavier than the 3pdrs on the Mimi and Toutou. According to Zimmer,
who should have known, the Kingani was armed with a 3.7 cm gun while the British were armed with 76mm guns.
Regarding the battle, Farwell provides a stirring account of the Kingani firing at the Mimi before it was close
enough to reply. Then, somehow, according to Farwell, the two British launches "came within 2,000 yards of the
Kingani and were able to return the German fire, [although] this brought the British within rifle and machinegun
range." Suddenly the Kingani’ s fore-deck "exploded in flames," her colours were hauled down and "someone
was seen waving a white cloth." Then, the Mimi rammed the crippled Kingani.

Zimmer provides a different account of the battle. The Kingani was too slow to escape the British launches, and
she was too lightly armed to reply to the rounds that were sent into her. According to Zimmer "the British stayed
outside of the range of the Kingani's gun (2400 meters) and could direct their fire carefully and without haste."
The first hit on the Kingani killed Leutnant zur See d.R. Junge (commanding the Kingani) and a German NCO.
The second hit killed Vizesteuermann d.R. Penning, and the third hit killed two men of the crew. This left
only two crewmen alive who were captured
before they could blow the Kingani up.

Regardless of which story, or combination of stories, one might prefer, the Kingani was ambushed successfully
by the British and towed to shallow water where Horndern states she sank. Farwell provides a graphic account
of the carnage aboard the Kingani, indicating that the war had taken on a "Heart of Darkness" attribute, but more
importantly he lists three Germans and eight African deck hands and servants. Only one of the Germans is
identified as part of the crew. One can hypothesize that the other two were part of the Schönfeld detachment.
The failure of this raider contingent prompted the withdrawal of the unit on December 27.”

Source: http://www.oocities.org/cdferree/tangan ... angan.html


“Die >>Kingani<< bot ein bequemes Ziel, da sie mit ihrer 3,7-cm-Revolverkanone nicht so weit schießen konnte
als die englischen Kanonenboote. Nachdem Leutnant z.S. Junge, 2 weitere Europäer und 3 Farbige gefallen
waren, heißte der Rest der Besatzung, 3 Europäer und 8 Farbige, die weiße Flagge.“

Source: The Operations in East-Africa, World War 1914-1918, Ludwig Boell, page 132.


“Kingani is captured
Mimi and Toutou set out of the harbour after Kingani had passed by. Unexpectedly finding himself pursued by
two motor boats flying the white ensign, Junge ordered that the speed be increased. Kingani′ s six-pounder gun
could only fire forward, however, and the faster and more nimble motor boats were able to close the range and
open fire with their three-pounder guns, while avoiding the German′s fire. After a short action lasting 11 minutes,
Kingani was hit on her gun, the shell passing through the gun shield and killing Junge and two petty officers,
Penne and Schwarz. After several more hits, her chief engineer hauled down the colours and the British took
possession of her.
Junge and four dead crewmembers were buried; one African crewman was allowed to stay on "Kingani" as a
stroker and three German and eight Africans were prisoners of war. After a hole in Kingani’s hull had been
patched, she was taken into service as HMS Fifi. Spicer-Simson explained that Fifi meant "tweet-tweet" in French,
and was suggested by the wife of a Belgian officer who had a small caged bird.”

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_fo ... Tanganyika



THE WHOLE CREW OF THE KINGANI

The crew members of the German vessel Kingani comprised on their last mission
on 26th December 1915 of 17 men; 6 European-, and 11 Local German seamen.




THE SIX EUROPEAN GERMAN CREWMEMBERS

1. Leutnant zur See d. R. Ernst Junge, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

2. Vizesteuermann d. R. Ernst Georg Penning, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

3. Bootsmannsmaat (Unteroffizier) d. Sw. Ludwig Schwarz, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

4. Obermatrose d. R. / First-class sailor of the reserve, Fritsche, (wounded and captured on 26.12.1915)

5. Unteroffizier (Maschinist) / Sergeant (machinist), Schlosser, (captured on 26.12.1915)

6. Ober-Maschinisten Anwärter / First-class machinist-aspirant, Milhan , (captured on 26.12.1915)

Online source: Namensliste der gefallenen Kolonialhelden des 1. Weltkrieges von Dr. Justus Schottelius.
http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/2014/brem ... frika.html

Source: Deutsches Kolonialblatt, Issued 1916, Fifth list of causalities of the Imperial `Schutztruppe´ for GEA, page 234.

Image




THE ELEVEN LOCAL GERMAN CREWMEMBERS

Three crewmembers fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 and further eight Local German sailors were captured.
Unfortunately the names of the Local German crewmembers are not known.



_____________________________________________________________________________________________

No ``Holiday in Cambodia´´ (song by Dead Kennedys 1980), but a short ``Vacation in Congo´´, is the background
of my next question and related to the two main events on Lake Tanganyika in December 1915 / February 1916.

I can remember definitely that I read a few weeks before in the net about two German graves in Kalemie / Albertville,
the Congolese / Belgian harbour , but unfortunately I haven´t save this page. (`Es ist aber auch zum Mäusemelken´)

Has someone an idea where I can search?

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Chris Dale » 29 Feb 2016 00:03

Here's a 37mm shell case from the Kingani
Image

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30023701

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 02 Mar 2016 16:11

Thanks for this interesting photo. It demonstrates clear that `Kingani´ have had a 3,7-cm-Revolverkanone,
when the vessel was captured on 26th December 1915.
(And no additional 6-pdr-gun / 5,7-cm-SK, Schnellade Kanone. The Germans haven´t this calibre in Africa)


The British `Fifi´ ex `Kingani´ was equipped later with a more powerful gun, but this was achieved with
the reduction of the seaworthiness.


Image
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 02 Mar 2016 16:34

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The Deutsch Ost-Afrikanische Zeitung (German East-African Newspaper) from 4th January 1916, confirmed
the names of the six European crew members on the ``Kingani´´. Furthermore five Baharia (?) and six Boys.

Image

Source: DEUTSCH-OSTAFRIKANISCHE ZEITUNG,
`Vom Kriegsschauplatz in der Kolonie´, Seite 1, Jahrgang XVIII, Nr. Nummer 1, Morogoro, 4. Januar 1916.





The same newspaper confirmed also the fourteen Names of the European crew on the ``Hedwig v. Wissmann´´.

Image

Source: DEUTSCH-OSTAFRIKANISCHE ZEITUNG,
`Vom Kriegsschauplatz in der Kolonie´, Seite 1, Jahrgang XVIII, Nr. Nummer 13, Morogoro, 15. Februar 1916.


.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 17 Mar 2016 05:01

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`Mimi´ and `Toutou´ (`Netta´ not shown) against the `Kingani´

Image

Source: http://peterbaxterafrica.com/index.php/ ... anganyika/


”. . . Junge and four dead crew members were buried; one African crewman was allowed to stay on "Kingani" as a stroker and three
German and eight Africans were prisoners of war. [45] Foden. Mimi & Toutou Go Forth. p. 197.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_fo ... Tanganyika


“Farwell provides a graphic account of the carnage aboard the Kingani, indicating that the war had taken on a "Heart of Darkness" attribute,“

Source: http://www.oocities.org/cdferree/tangan ... angan.html


Here is explained, what the upper author means with (Joseph Conrad´s) "Heart of Darkness" attribute:
“ . . . . . With her bow badly damaged, Mimi returned to shore, and was beached. While Mimi fled the scene, Dudley had come
alongside the Kingani in the Toutou, taken off two survivors, put a prize crew aboard and ordered a petty officer to try and get
the Kingani back to shore. This was difficult, due to the Kingani listing after having a hole blown in the port side of the hull. What
made it even more difficult, was that there was blood and various body parts from the three Germans who had been killed in the
engagement – the Captain and two sailors - spread around the ship. The petty officer beached the ship, and then promptly fainted.

Eleven crew members of the Kingani – three Germans and eight Africans survived, and were assembled on shore after the Kingani
was beached. They had heard of the English plan to transport the boats overland, but thought that it would be impossible to achieve.
The German dead were given a military funeral, while the eleven who survived were marched away to a Belgian prison. Spicer-
Simson
took as booty the ring of the dead captain, while a couple of his crew members took blood from the captain, and stored it in
small bottles, along with pieces of the captain’s fingers as well. Spicer-Simson was promoted to substantive commander, while Dudley
was promoted to full lieutenant. Spicer-Simson had already made quite an impact on the local Africans, due to his tattoos and behaviour,
and his role in the battle turned him into a deity, with many Africans kneeling, clapping their hands or throwing themselves on the ground
when he went by. He was given the name “Bwana Chifunga-tumbo”- “Lord-Belly Cloth” . . . . .”

Source: https://graham64.wordpress.com/page/2/
(British comment in 2013) “ . . . . . This is the stuff of classic British Imperial heroism. . . . . “




“. . . . Angeführt wurde das Unternehmen von Geoffrey Basil Spicer-Simson, einem ebenso exzentrischen wie erfolglosen Marine-
offizier, dessen Selbsteinschätzung und militärischen Leistungen einander diametral gegenüberstanden. Foden nimmt an, dass seine
Vorgesetzten den unbeliebten Aufschneider schlicht loswerden wollten, als sie ihm den hoffnungslosen Auftrag übertrugen. . . . . “

Source: http://www.rezensionen.ch/african_queen/3596168376/
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________




FUNERAL OF GERMAN SAILORS IN ALBERTVILLE / BELGIAN CONGO IN 1915/16?


During the two naval battles on 26th December 1915 and 9th February 1916 on Lake Tanganyika five European and eight Local
German sailors
have been killed. The above listed British sources mentioned only the funeral of the `Kingani´-victims in December
1915. This sounds logic, because the `Hedwig v. Wissmann´ sank after the fight in February 1916, probably together with the dead.



Furthermore the sources mentioned, that five German crew members from the `Kingani´ have been buried:

1. Leutnant zur See d. R. Ernst Junge, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

2. Vizesteuermann d. R. Ernst Georg Penning, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

3. Bootsmannsmaat (Unteroffizier) d. Sw. Ludwig Schwarz, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

4. Unknown Local German sailor, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)

5. Unknown Local German sailor, († fell during the fight on 26.12.1915 on Kingani)



“ Burial of German Sailors with military honours at Lukuga / Albertville, December 1915 “

Image

Source: https://hetarchief.be/de/media/la-belgi ... RkAV9hFD4o



It was common practice at that time, to bury Europeans and Africans on different cemeteries. This happens also in
Albertville / Belgian Congo. Therefore I consider that also German victims of war have been buried on the European
cemetery. Below is the key from the city map in 1955 of Albertville (Kalemie) with the symbols: Cimetière Européens
and Cimetière Congolais. Unfortunately the Number 16 for Cimetière Européens is unintelligible on the whole map.



________________________________________________________________________________________________________
BY THE WAY:

This is really a wonderful homepage for someone who is interested for Lake Tanganyika: http://www.albertville.be/index.php

Les hydravions belges du Tanganyika http://www.albertville.be/escadrille-tanganyika-01.html

La guerre 14-18 au Congo Belge (1) http://www.albertville.be/la-guerre-14- ... lge-1.html

La guerre 14-18 au Congo Belge (2) http://www.albertville.be/la-guerre-14- ... lge-2.html

(Only on the attached Link are many, very rare old photos, ship drawings and maps; - really unique; - take your time!!!)
Accueil introduction / CONGO Lac Tanganyika http://marinebelge.be/bateauapropulsion.html
________________________________________________________________________________________________________




WHERE IS NOWADAYS THE FORMAL EUROPEAN CEMETERY IN KALEMIE / ALBERTVILLE?


This interesting webpage, as well with many rare photos, shows Belgian cemeteries and individual graves, but all in German East-Africa.

Tombes et cimetières belges de l’Est Africain: http://www.1914-1918.be/cimetieres_belg ... ricain.php



I try to prepare in the best possible way for a short leave in autumn of this year, searching these graves in Kalemie.

Has anyone further informations about the location of the cemetery in Kalemie?

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 18 Mar 2016 19:06

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________________________________________________________________________________________________________

BY THE WAY:

Regarding `remnants of the past´ of little known or little noticed events in remote areas of Western and Southern part of GEA,
I found on this webpage: La Grande Guerre: Reportages et Témoignages (upper one third) Reportage: La Guerre en Afrique
http://www.forum-auto.com/les-clubs/dis ... 67-350.htm


In the brief report about the events along the German East-Africa / Belgian Congo-Border River Ruzizi and the fights between the
German `Schutztruppe´ and the Belgian `Force Publique´ about Luvungi (nowadays: Karenzu / D.R. Congo), I found some photos
about the German Cemetery in Cibitoke (nowadays in Burundi) and the difficult terrain in the George of the Border River Ruzizi.




Image
Source: http://club.caradisiac.com/zygomard/zyg ... 58485.html



Image
Source: http://club.caradisiac.com/zygomard/zyg ... to_4558484



Image
Source: http://club.caradisiac.com/zygomard/zyg ... 58588.html




I think it´s worth to follow this event at a later time also on-site and with a separate topic . . . . . . .

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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Re: German survivors after naval battle on Lake Tanganyika in February 1916

Post by Tanzania » 20 May 2016 09:33

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Two further photos which match the headline. The first picture was well known. As far I can remember;
Leftmost (with raised arm) Spicer-Simson wears a kilt. If he led the attack of the flotilla, how he can wait
at the same time at the beach for the arrival of the ships? However the second photo I didn´t saw before.


Image

Source: https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/illu ... 01-014.JPG



Image

Source: https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/illu ... 01-015.JPG

.
“Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. . . . All History was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary” – G. ORWELL 1984

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