Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Discussions on High Command, strategy and the Armed Forces (Wehrmacht) in general.
woodyab
Member
Posts: 51
Joined: 12 Dec 2008 08:49

Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by woodyab » 02 Oct 2017 05:28

Hello all. I have read that an HV-Platz was located at Gumrak railway station during the Stalingrad battle. Can anyone advise which unit the HVP was attached to?
Was the railway rolling stock being used as medical wards, German or Russian? And what was the station building used for? Also, does anyone know of any photographs showing the station at the time of the conflict?
Much appreciated for any help that you may give,
Thanks again,
Tony

jesk
Banned
Posts: 1973
Joined: 04 Aug 2017 08:19
Location: Belarus

Re: Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by jesk » 02 Oct 2017 07:28

There were many field hospitals, even at the company level.

http://nordrigel.livejournal.com/1704.html
Sanitary company (San.Kp.) consisted now of 2 heavy and one light platoons, and received significantly greater opportunities. In the future, the company could organize two mobile and one normal field hospital (HV-Platz) (which includes the field hospital itself and collection point for lightly wounded). In the future, such reorganization justified itself.

woodyab
Member
Posts: 51
Joined: 12 Dec 2008 08:49

Re: Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by woodyab » 02 Oct 2017 09:22

Jesk, thank you for your prompt reply. I understand that there were a few field hospitals in the Stalingrad area, but specifically, I wanted to know the name of the one at Gumrak and the higher formation it was attached to. My questions weren't very clear. I understand, that at the time the rolling stock at the station was used as medical accommodation. Would that rolling stock have been German or Russian? Was the station itself used as some sort of medical facility?
And finally. Are there any contemporaneous photographs of the railway station.?
thank you.
Tony

GregSingh
Member
Posts: 2756
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by GregSingh » 27 Dec 2017 06:04

Gumrak was on restored broad gauge line, so most likely Russian rolling stock was used. You can see one Soviet carriage there on the photo.

What date do you have in mind? Battle lasted for several months. Things changed.
According to 295. ID sources there was a hospital for that unit in Gumrak, but I couldn't confirm exactly when it was.
Once encirclement was in place, they could not run any trains, so perhaps rolling stock was used for other purposes?

That station building is rather small...
Gumrak1.jpg
Gumrak2.jpg
May2015 Gumrak.jpg
Source : Stalingrad Album
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
If we become increasingly humble about how little we know, we may be more eager to search.

Dann Falk
Member
Posts: 378
Joined: 02 Mar 2009 18:34
Location: California - USA

Re: Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by Dann Falk » 27 Dec 2017 19:26

Greetings all,

Any rail equipment within the Stalingrad pocket would have been Russian. The Germans were never able to get a direct rail line open, so all supplies had to be transshipped from German trains on the west side of the Don River to a few working Russian gauge trains running on the east side of the Don.

Very nice photos, did you notice the windows of the station had been bricked up? A small opening was left in the bricks, but they were very high up, so most likely the openings were there to let light into the building and not for fighting. The station building also survived the battle, so that would tell me it wasn’t used for combat. A hospital would be a good guess. Also the second photo, of the rail car, also shows what looks like piles clothing and web gear taken from wounded or kill soldiers. Once again this implies a nearby hospital.

Hope this helps

bam
Member
Posts: 171
Joined: 08 Sep 2005 22:10
Location: moseley-u.k.

Re: Re: HV-Platz Gumrak.

Post by bam » 05 Apr 2018 23:24

From Heinrich Gerlachs novel about Stalingrad:
"Padre Peters had remained in Gumrak...he crawled or stumbled over the train tracks to lines of railway carriages on sidings. These were home to the so-called" lightly wounded"...[there were frozen] bodies that had been heaped up to make a set of steps into the tall cattle truck... Not infrequently, one of the carriages took a direct hit, and each time, as if by some miracle, out of 20 to 30 occupants, some 6 to 10 came out alive...

I know its from a novel, but Gerlach was there as witness, was caught, & survived 7 years in captivity.

Return to “German Strategy & General German Military Discussion”